Bad Apple!! Канада


Bad Apple!! Канада

February 1st, 2000

[Editorial] Apple Canada: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
by Oliver Dueck

In December, I wrote an editorial about the current situation of Apple Canada. At that time, the story of Computer Buyer Warehouse Direct suing Apple Canada had just broke, which resulted in many discussions on the internet about the situation. After that editorial was published, I got a lot of feedback from fellow Canadians, giving me a broad view of what is going on.

Many were relatively content with their local Apple retailers. And what did these satisfied folks have in common? They lived in large cities like Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal. Additionally, the only reason they were satisfied was because their cities had one or two good dealers, with the other half dozen being incompetent bungling fools. Those that lived in less populated areas were generally not satisfied with their Apple dealer, if they even had one.

Some Apple dealers tried to justify their higher-than-MacWarehouse pricing, presumably because I had mentioned that my local dealer was charging 15% more than that ubiquitous catalog reseller. I want to make it clear that I don’t have a problem with an Apple dealer charging a few percent more than mail order; they are justified in doing so, because they can offer a level of service and support not possible with a mail order company. Unfortunately, some of these dealers charge premium prices and don’t offer an acceptable level of service.

Additionally, some resellers told me that we didn’t need additional mail order companies; one was more than enough. It is understandable that they would say that, because a mail order company only hurts them, but from the perspective of people who live in rural areas or whose one Apple dealer is practically worthless, additional mail order companies are definitely needed.

In my editorial, I had suggested that Future Shop should sell Apple hardware through their web site. Almost everyone I heard from told me their Future Shop horror stories (salesmen trying to sell them PCs, little or no Mac software, etc.). I realize that; my point was that with online sales, that wouldn’t matter as long as they could ship Macs out by mail. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like that will happen.

One other thing Canadians have to deal with that Americans don’t: French. I got reports from several readers claiming that getting a French product can sometimes be very difficult; for example, French keyboards for iMacs and G4s were substantially delayed. Whether you like it or not, Canada is a bilingual country and Apple has to get on the ball and offer both languages simultaneously — it is only logical.

But perhaps the most damning complaint against an Apple dealer came from a reader in Moncton. After this reader finally convinced his PC-using brother to get Macs for his business, the owner of the local Apple dealer told him he would be better off using DOS for his accounting needs. This person had walked into the store expecting to buy ten computers and a lot of related hardware, and he is told to stick with DOS? No wonder people don’t buy Macs in such areas!

Clearly, the biggest problem with Apple Canada is in distribution. There are certainly some excellent Apple dealers, but they are in the minority. These incompetent dealers are hurting Apple badly. Apple Canada has to get on the ball and straighten out its dealers, and make it easier for those of us in rural areas to purchase and service our computers. Until that happens, Apple will never experience the growth it deserves in this country.

Oliver is a computer science student a the University of New Brunswick, in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. He has been using Macs since 1986 when his father would bring home a Mac Plus on the weekends. He was one of the original writers for Webintosh, and before that was a contributor to the now-defunct MacSense CD magazine.

One bad Apple

Dave Webb

While we in Canada wait with bated breath for Apple to bestow upon us the privilege of owning an iPhone, developments south of here might tarnish the World’s Coolest Phone’s hitherto unblemished reputation.

Apple’s software update has “bricked” (as in, rendered about as useful as a) iPhones hacked to work on networks other than AT&T’s in the States. Phones with third-party software freeze. Oh, and there have been some feature upgrades, but they seem to be quite beside the point.


Apple claims it wasn’t its intention to disable hacked phones, and it warned users in advance that the upgrade would make the altered phones “permanently inoperable.” It takes a more credulous person than me to believe there’s anything accidental about it.

Yes, tampering with the phone’s software is a violation of the licence agreement. Yes, Apple is entitled to control the use of its intellectual property. But releasing an update to brick a $600 phone, shortly after slashing the price of the iPhone so early adopters had to suck up a $200 beating, after shamelessly torquing the hype engine in the first place, smacks of arrogance. Owning an iPhone isn’t a status symbol anymore, it’s an acknowledgment of indentiture to Apple.

And it makes me a lot less inclined to pick up one of those shiny new iMacs.

Am I overreacting?

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Dave Webb is a freelance editor and writer. A veteran journalist of more than 20 years’ experience (15 of them in technology), he has held senior editorial positions with a number of technology publications. He was honoured with an Andersen Consulting Award for Excellence in Business Journalism in 2000, and several Canadian Online Publishing Awards as part of the ComputerWorld Canada team.

Bad Apple!! Канада

February 1st, 2000

[Editorial] Apple Canada: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
by Oliver Dueck

In December, I wrote an editorial about the current situation of Apple Canada. At that time, the story of Computer Buyer Warehouse Direct suing Apple Canada had just broke, which resulted in many discussions on the internet about the situation. After that editorial was published, I got a lot of feedback from fellow Canadians, giving me a broad view of what is going on.

Many were relatively content with their local Apple retailers. And what did these satisfied folks have in common? They lived in large cities like Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal. Additionally, the only reason they were satisfied was because their cities had one or two good dealers, with the other half dozen being incompetent bungling fools. Those that lived in less populated areas were generally not satisfied with their Apple dealer, if they even had one.

Some Apple dealers tried to justify their higher-than-MacWarehouse pricing, presumably because I had mentioned that my local dealer was charging 15% more than that ubiquitous catalog reseller. I want to make it clear that I don’t have a problem with an Apple dealer charging a few percent more than mail order; they are justified in doing so, because they can offer a level of service and support not possible with a mail order company. Unfortunately, some of these dealers charge premium prices and don’t offer an acceptable level of service.

Additionally, some resellers told me that we didn’t need additional mail order companies; one was more than enough. It is understandable that they would say that, because a mail order company only hurts them, but from the perspective of people who live in rural areas or whose one Apple dealer is practically worthless, additional mail order companies are definitely needed.

In my editorial, I had suggested that Future Shop should sell Apple hardware through their web site. Almost everyone I heard from told me their Future Shop horror stories (salesmen trying to sell them PCs, little or no Mac software, etc.). I realize that; my point was that with online sales, that wouldn’t matter as long as they could ship Macs out by mail. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like that will happen.

One other thing Canadians have to deal with that Americans don’t: French. I got reports from several readers claiming that getting a French product can sometimes be very difficult; for example, French keyboards for iMacs and G4s were substantially delayed. Whether you like it or not, Canada is a bilingual country and Apple has to get on the ball and offer both languages simultaneously — it is only logical.

But perhaps the most damning complaint against an Apple dealer came from a reader in Moncton. After this reader finally convinced his PC-using brother to get Macs for his business, the owner of the local Apple dealer told him he would be better off using DOS for his accounting needs. This person had walked into the store expecting to buy ten computers and a lot of related hardware, and he is told to stick with DOS? No wonder people don’t buy Macs in such areas!


Clearly, the biggest problem with Apple Canada is in distribution. There are certainly some excellent Apple dealers, but they are in the minority. These incompetent dealers are hurting Apple badly. Apple Canada has to get on the ball and straighten out its dealers, and make it easier for those of us in rural areas to purchase and service our computers. Until that happens, Apple will never experience the growth it deserves in this country.

Oliver is a computer science student a the University of New Brunswick, in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. He has been using Macs since 1986 when his father would bring home a Mac Plus on the weekends. He was one of the original writers for Webintosh, and before that was a contributor to the now-defunct MacSense CD magazine.

Kanji: Bad Apple!!

Lyrics Haruka Arrange Masayoshi Minoshima (Alstroemeria Records, DFR) — arr. Bad Apple!! in Lotus Land Story Vocal nomico

流れてく 時の中ででも 気だるさが ほらグルグル廻って
私から 離れる心も 見えないわ そう知らない?

自分から 動くこともなく 時の隙間に 流され続けて
知らないわ 周りのことなど 私は私 それだけ

夢見てる? なにも見てない? 語るも無駄な 自分の言葉
悲しむなんて 疲れるだけよ 何も感じず 過ごせばいいの

戸惑う言葉 与えられても 自分の心 ただ上の空
もし私から 動くのならば すべて変えるのなら 黒にする

こんな自分に 未来はあるの? こんな世界に 私はいるの?
今切ないの? 今悲しいの? 自分の事も わからないまま

歩むことさえ 疲れるだけよ 人のことなど 知りもしないわ
こんな私も 変われるのなら もし変われるのなら 白になる

流れてく 時の中ででも 気だるさがほら グルグル廻って
私から 離れる心も 見えないわそう 知らない?

自分から 動くこともなく 時の隙間に 流され続けて
知らないわ 周りのことなど 私は私 それだけ

夢見てる? なにも見てない? 語るも無駄な 自分の言葉
悲しむなんて 疲れるだけよ 何も感じず 過ごせばいいの

戸惑う言葉 与えられても 自分の心 ただ上の空
もし私から 動くのならば すべて変えるのなら 黒にする

無駄な時間に 未来はあるの? こんな所に 私はいるの?
私のことを 言いたいならば ことばにするのなら 「ろくでなし」

こんな所に 私はいるの? こんな時間に 私はいるの?
こんな私も 変われるもなら もし変われるのなら 白になる


今夢見てる? なにも見てない? 語るも無駄な 自分の言葉
悲しむなんて 疲れるだけよ 何も感じず 過ごせばいいの

戸惑う言葉 与えられても 自分の心 ただ上の空
もし私から 動くのならば すべて変えるのなら 黒にする

動くのならば 動くのならば すべて壊すわ すべて壊すわ
悲しむならば 悲しむならば 私の心 白く変われる?

貴方の事も 私のことも 全ての事も まだ知らないの
重い目蓋を 開けたのならば すべて壊すのなら 黒になれ!!!

Bad Apple!! (видео)

Видеоклип на песню «Bad Apple!!» группы Alstroemeria Records был создан в 2009 году и с тех пор стал одним из наиболее известных произведений подобного рода среди Тохо-сообщества, а также прославился и за его пределами.

Содержание

История [ править ]

Композиция «Bad Apple!!» входит в саундтрек опубликованной в 1998 году игры «Lotus Land Story» в качестве темы 3-го уровня. Спустя 9 лет в 2007 году в альбоме «Lovelight» группы Alstroemeria Records была выпущена аранжировка этой мелодии с вокалом певицы Nomico. Один из пользователей сайта Nicov >[1] . 27 октября 2009 года на том же сайте пользователем あにら было опубликовано видео, реализующее данный замысел.

Клип выполнен в технике силуэтной 3D-анимации и демонстрирует различных персонажей Тохо. С момента публикации был выпущен целый ряд производных версий в разных техниках, пародий и переводов на разные языки. Сам ролик спустя год после публикации достиг 10 миллионов просмотров, что стало первым таким случаем на Nico Nico Douga.

Версия видео, созданная по принципу «stop motion» была продемонстрирована на канале CNN, где её ошибочно посчитали оригиналом клипа [2] .

Bad Apple

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Can Apple make an iPhone that isn’t bad for the environment?

Published: Oct 8, 2020 11:05 a.m. ET

Apple detailed its efforts to reduce its environmental impact during the company’s product preview event

JacobPassy

The culture of consumption is having a disastrous effect on the environment, environmentalists say, and the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has made the intersection of economics and climate change a cornerstone of their 2020 award.

The 2020 Nobel Prize for Economics Science was awarded to William Nordhaus and Paul Romer, two American economists whose work emphasizes the importance of sustainable economic growth and an economic system that takes climate change into account.

“At its heart, economics deals with the management of scarce resources,” the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. “Nature dictates the main constraints on economic growth and our knowledge determines how well we deal with these constraints.”

The interaction of environmental sustainability and technology is, perhaps, most evident in the production of smartphones, environmental activists say.

Apple executives have detailed steps the Cupertino, Calif.-based company is taking to improve its environmental footprint.

Apple AAPL, +0.03% announced last month that its newest iPhone models, the XS, the XS Max and the XR, will feature logic boards made out of recycled tin — a nod to the tech giant’s efforts toward improved sustainability and mining-free supply chain. That move will reduce the amount of tin mined for smartphones by 10,000 tons every year, the company said.

The company is also ramping up its smartphone recycling program. Consumers can send their iPhones to Apple. If in good condition, the company will resell them and pay back the consumer. Otherwise, Apple’s robot arm, named Daisy, will disassemble to recycle the parts for free.

The new efforts build on previous initiatives at Apple toward becoming more eco-friendly. Apple previously said it’s transitioning to 100% recycled tin solder for logic boards in the iPhone 6S.

Some experts, however, say much more needs to be done.


Consumers are churning through smartphones

There have been 7.1 billion smartphones manufactured since 2007, according to Greenpeace — enough to equip nearly every person in the world with a device. Yet newer devices like the iPhone XS continue to be produced as consumers seek out updated and improved models.

“It’s magnifying the problem very significantly,” said Alex Sebastian, co-founder of Orchard, a Canadian company that resells smartphones. “If you look at a computer, most people use it until it’s unusable. But people have gotten used to new updates to the phone every one to two years.”

It’s largely thanks to the pace at which companies like Apple and Samsung 005930, -0.37% release new smartphone models that consumers don’t hold on to a device for long. The average age of a smartphone traded in between April 2020 and June 2020 was 2.58 years, according to data collected by HYLA Mobile, a device trade-in company. Traded-in iPhones tended to be slightly older — partly because they are typically the most expensive on the market.

‘If you look at a computer, most people use it until it’s unusable. But people have gotten used to new updates to the phone every one to two years.’ Alex Sebastian, Orchard

Unfortunately, few people recycle their smartphones when they purchase replacements. A 2014 study from the United Nations University, the UN’s research arm, estimated that less than 16% of e-waste is recycled. That same study calculated that 3 million metric tons of e-waste was produced in 2014 alone. Much of that waste goes into landfills or is shipped to developing countries to be taken apart to reclaim the metals held within.

But when handled improperly, there’s a high likelihood that heavy metals such as cobalt or tungsten will leech into groundwater and cause adverse health effects. “There’s no way of getting rid of a heavy metal,” said Sue Williams, a documentary maker and director of “Death by Design,” a film that looks into the environmental impact of technology.

Heavy metals that are burned when smartphones are melted down, for instance, add to the atmospheric pollution that scientists say is contributing to climate change. The air pollution in China is also associated with adverse health consequences, as the Washington Post and others have reported.

Mining metal for smartphones can devastate ecosystems

But smartphones don’t just create pollution when they are discarded. The mining of the metals needed to create them can devastate ecosystems. The world’s largest producer of cobalt, which is used in the rechargeable lithium ion batteries found in smartphones and other electronics, is the Democratic Republic of the Congo, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Cobalt mining companies regularly flout the country’s laws meant to protect natural resources and citizens, according to research by the Center for Research on Multinational Corporations (known as SOMO), an independent, nonprofit research and network organization. Consequently, wastewater from cobalt mines has polluted drinking-water resources in the country, SOMO found.

Other issues beyond pollution persist in mining practices in developing countries. In the DRC, for instance, child labor is common, and proceeds from mining operations are used to fuel ongoing conflicts in the country, according to an investigation by the Washington Post. In March, Apple said it would temporarily cease buying cobalt mined by hand in Congo.

It’s an uphill battle for environmentalists. Despite the deeply concerning environmental ramifications, smartphones have become a necessary evil. Nearly one-third of people said they now interact with their smartphones more than with friends and family, according to a report last year from Bank of America.

Carbon emissions is another smartphone-related problem

Additionally, the vast majority (73%) of carbon dioxide associated with smart devices is emitted during manufacturing, according to Greenpeace. “It’s not possible to make an electronic device that’s environmentally friendly,” said Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit. “We’re very far away from that.”

‘It’s not possible to make an electronic device that’s environmentally friendly.’ Kyle Wiens, iFixit


Some believe Apple could be doing more to address its environmental impact. The choice to remove the headphone jack from the iPhone 7 likely added further to e-waste as older earbuds became obsolete without a new adapter, Wiens said.

The AirPods wireless earbuds are powered by a rechargeable battery — but Wiens said that battery cannot be replaced. Traditional headphones use wiring and magnets that are easily recyclable, he said. (Apple did not return a request for comment regarding this matter.)

There are ways to extend the life of your smartphone

Consumers can take steps to ensure their smartphone use is as environmentally sound as possible. Putting the phone on airplane mode whenever feasible will conserve energy and extend the battery’s life — as will making sure that the device does not overheat when charging.

Additionally, smartphones can outlive their original batteries. Consumers can take a device to the original retailer, get the battery replaced by an independent repair shop or even do it themselves. Old batteries can be disposed of at many hardware stores and electronics retailers such as Best Buy, Wiens added. (Consumers should check their warranty before going to an independent repair shop or making fixes themselves, however.)

“The best thing you can do with your phone is not to let it sit in a drawer or throw it out but to sell it immediately,” said Wiens. Not taking that action opens a door to the risk that the device will get too out-of-style to be refurbished, meaning it could become 100% e-waste.

For those who don’t want to exert the effort of researching prices and selling their used phone, Sebastian recommended contacting charities. Many charitable organizations will give previously owned smart devices to people in need if the device is still working, ensuring an extended life for it.

As for recycling, consumers are best off going through major retailers such as Best Buy BBY, -0.05% and Amazon AMZN, +0.13% or manufacturers such as Apple and LG 066570, +1.42% . They can also find a legitimate local recycler through the Consumer Technology Association.

A recent report from the Basel Action Network, a nongovernmental organization combatting the export of toxic waste from technology, found myriad companies running scams where they claim to recycle devices properly but instead ship them to developing countries where they are dismantled improperly.

Consumers who purchase new devices should also research their environmental footprint. United Laboratories, a global independent safety science company, recently established standards for “green electronics” that are more environmentally friendly. Thus far, Samsung is the only smartphone manufacturer to receive the new certification. (Samsung did not immediately return a request for comment.)

Why all might not be lost

While smartphones certainly have an adverse impact on the environment, there are silver linings to their adoption, according to a report from the Consumer Technology Association. For starters, smartphones represent only a fraction of the electronic waste that’s been produced historically.

Plus, they use fewer materials (as compared with items like cathode-ray televisions). And because smartphones can perform many functions, they have replaced the need to have separate devices such as an MP3 player and a digital camera, meaning fewer materials are being used overall.

Scientists are also researching ways to make the glass in smartphones more smash-resistant. And while there is room for improvement where recycling is concerned, consumer electronics have the fastest growing recycling rate of any product category in the United States, according to a report from the Environmental Protection Agency.

This story was updated on Oct. 8, 2020.

Bad Apple

Reviewing the latest accounts of British soldiers abusing Iraqis, I’m wondering what the «bad apple» metaphor is all about. How does it go «One bad apple reflects badly on the whole barrel»?

Reviewing the latest accounts of British soldiers abusing Iraqis, I’m wondering what the «bad apple» metaphor is all about. How does it go «One bad apple reflects badly on the whole barrel»?

No: the central idea is that a single bad apple will in time corrupt all the apples in the barrel.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)

Reviewing the latest accounts of British soldiers abusing Iraqis, I’m wondering what the «bad apple» metaphor is all about. How does it go «One bad apple reflects badly on the whole barrel»?

«One bad (rotten) apple spoils the barrel.»

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.

Matti Lamprhey wrote on 20 Jan 2005:

Reviewing the latest accounts of British soldiers abusing Iraqis, I’m . «One bad apple reflects badly on the whole barrel»?

«One bad (rotten) apple spoils the barrel.»

Or if you’re from Utah:
I can tell you’ve been hurt
by that look on your face, girl.
Some guy brought sad into your happy world.
You need love, but you’re afraid that if you give in, someone else will come along
and sock it to ya again.
One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl.
Oh, give it one more try before you give up on love. One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch girl.
Oh, I don’t care what they say,
I don’t care what you heard.
I could make you happy, baby,
satisfy you, too.
But how can I if you won’t give me a chance
to prove my love to you?
Won’t you just give me one chance?
I’ll give you my guarantee that you won’t be hurt again.

One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl.
Oh, give it one more try
before you give up on love.
One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl.
Oh, I don’t care what they say,
I don’t care what you heard now.
I’ve been noticing you, baby,
for a long, long time.
And I’m not ashamed to tell the world
that you really messed up my mind.
Girl, to me you’re like a dream come true.
I’d rather hurt myself than to ever hurt you.
One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl.
Oh, give it one more try
before you give up on love, girl.
One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl.
Oh, I don’t care what they say,
I don’t care what you heard now.
One bad apple don’t spoil the whole bunch, girl..

(Nobody’s going to believe me, but that closing ellipsis was there before I cut and pasted the whole lyric)..r

One Bad Apple

Wikipedia open wikipedia design.

«One Bad Apple»
Single by The Osmonds
from the album Osmonds
B-side «He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother»
Released November 14, 1970
Format 7″ vinyl
Recorded October 26, 1970
Genre Pop, R&B, bubblegum pop
Length 2 : 46
Label MGM
Songwriter(s) George Jackson
The Osmonds singles chronology
«I’ve Got Loving on My Mind»
(1970)
«One Bad Apple»
(1970)
«Double Lovin'»
(1971)

«One Bad Apple» was a No. 1 hit single released by The Osmonds on November 14, 1970. It debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 on January 2, 1971. It hit the top of the chart on February 13, 1971 and stayed there for five weeks. It also reached No. 6 on the R&B chart. [1] Billboard ranked it as the No. 4 song for 1971. [2] Both «One Bad Apple» and the Donny Osmond-credited single «Sweet and Innocent» are on the 1970 album Osmonds. It was certified Gold by the RIAA on February 4, 1971.

The song was written by George Jackson, who originally had the Jackson 5 in mind when he wrote it. [3] According to Donny Osmond, Michael Jackson later told him that the Jackson 5 almost recorded this song first, but chose to record «ABC» instead. [4]

«One Bad Apple» was also used as the theme to The Osmonds cartoon show on ABC-TV.

Contents

Other versions [ edit ]

  • 1984: Nolan Thomas included it on his only album, Yo Little Brother
  • 1974: The Credibility Gap recorded «You Can’t Judge a Book by Its Hair» and a German version (with totally unrelated lyrics), «Foreign Novelty Smash,» both of which borrow melodic themes from «One Bad Apple» and the Jackson 5’s «The Love You Save.» Both recordings appear on the album A Great Gift >Charts [ edit ]

Weekly charts [ edit ]

Chart (1970–71) Peak
position
Australia KMR [5] 35
Canada RPM Top Singles 1
New Zealand (Listener) [6] 17
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 [7] 1
U.S. Billboard R&B/Soul [8] 6
U.S. Billboard Adult Contemporary 37
U.S. Cash Box Top 100 [9] 1
Chart (1988) Peak
position
UK [10] 89

Year-end charts [ edit ]

Chart (1971) Rank
Canada [11] 20
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 [12] 4
U.S. R&B/Soul (Billboard) [13] 48
U.S. Cash Box [14] 9

Certifications [ edit ]

* sales figures based on certification alone
^ shipments figures based on certification alone

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Region Certification Certified units/sales
United States (RIAA) [15] Gold 1,000,000 ^