Benefits (Canada Child Benefit, GSTHST, т.д.) Канада

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Benefits (Canada Child Benefit, GST/HST, т.д.) Канада

Canada Child Tax Benefit — The Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) is a tax free monthly payment available to eligible Canadian families to help with the cost of raising children. The CCTB can incorporate the National Child Benefit (NCB), a monthly benefit for low income… … Wikipedia

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Канада Child Tax Benefit — Canada Child Tax Benefit

Канада Child Tax Benefit (ССТВ) был налог -бесплатно ежемесячный платеж имеющим на это право канадских семей , чтобы помочь с расходами на воспитание детей . ССТВ может включать Национальную пособие на ребенка (НЦБ), ежемесячное пособие для малообеспеченных семей с детьми, а также ребенка пособие по инвалидности (CDB), ежемесячное пособие для семей , осуществляющих уход за детьми с тяжелыми и длительными психическими или физическими недостатками .

ССТВА было принято в ответ на обязательство , принятое канадским парламент в ноябре 1989 года, чтобы искоренить детскую бедность в Канаде в 2000 году , однако, было установлено , что из — за сокращения в социальную помощь , влияние этой программы в снижении детской бедности ничтожна.

Эта программа была ликвидирована в 2020 году и заменен Canada Child Benefit (БКК), в безналоговой платеж в размере $ 533,00 за ребенка в возрасте до 6 и $ 450 за ребенка в возрасте от 6 до 17. Что уменьшается при различных скоростях по числу детей и количеству денег домохозяйство делает так , что домашние хозяйства в верхней части «среднего класса» и « с высоким уровнем дохода» не получают ничего.

Supercharge Your Canada Child Benefit by Making an RRSP Contribution

Posted by Enoch Omololu | Updated on Dec 28, 2020 | Investing Series | 6

**Updated for 2020!

Every New Year, you’re allowed to make contributions to your RRSP during the first 60 days and claim it as a deduction in your income tax return for the previous year. For example, in 2020, you can make RRSP contributions (up until March 1, 2020) using your contribution room from 2020 or previous years, and claim it as a deduction in your income tax return for the 2020 tax year.

This is why the first 2 months of every new year is referred to as the “RRSP Season.” People try to catch up with RRSP contributions they have neglected over the last year because they do not want to miss out on the juicy tax refunds that will come in the mail after they have filed their tax return.

And, of course, they also remember that they need to save for retirement!

For a bit of background, RRSP is an acronym for Registered Retirement Savings Plan. You can contribute up to 18% of your earned income per year, up to a maximum limit – $26,500 for the 2020 tax year ($26,230 for 2020).

RRSP contributions can be claimed as a deduction in your income tax return and will result in a tax refund. The amount of refund you receive is based on your marginal tax rate. Money invested in the RRSP grows tax-deferred until withdrawal in retirement, and unused contribution room can be carried forward to future years.

As if there are not enough reasons to make you want to save for retirement, there is an additional incentive (if you have kids) for why you should consider making that RRSP contribution before March 1!

Canada Child Benefit (CCB)

The Canada Child Benefit was introduced in the Federal Budget of 2020. The program was set up to replace the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB). Like the CCTB (and unlike the UCCB), Canada Child Benefit payments are non-taxable.

Eligibility for CCB payments is based on a family’s combined net income. For 2020, the maximum eligible annual benefits under the CCB are $6,639 per eligible child under age 6 and $5,602 per eligible child between 6 and 17 years. Families that have children with disabilities may receive an additional benefit of $2,832 per child for the disability tax credit.

The maximum benefit is received by a family with an annual net income less than $30,450. For net annual incomes between $30,450 and $65,976 and those above $65,976, there will be a clawback of the CCB based on the number of children as follows:

** Percentage of clawback on net income over $65,976

For example, a family with 2 children under the age of 6 and a family net income of $29,500 would qualify for the maximum annual benefit of $13,278 ($6,639 x 2).

If the same family had a net income of $60,000, there would be a clawback of 13.5% on the excess income over $30,450 i.e. ($60,976 – $30,450) x 13.5% = $4,121. Therefore, the family would receive a total CCB benefit of $9,157 (i.e. $13,278 – $4,121).

RRSP Contributions Are Considered A Deduction

RRSP contributions are treated in a way that highlights the difference between tax credits and tax deductions. While tax credits are calculated at the lowest tax rate (currently 15%), deductions will impact your income at your highest marginal tax rate.

Additionally, because tax deductions lower your net income on line 236 of your tax return, they impact your eligibility for income-tested benefits at both federal and provincial levels.

The main deductions that lower your net income on line 236 include:

  • RRSP contributions
  • Pension adjustments
  • Childcare expenses
  • Professional and Union dues
  • Employment expenses

Are you seeing where I’m going with this?

Because RRSP contributions are considered a tax deduction on your income tax return, they lower your taxable income and can increase the amount of CCB payments you are eligible for!

Canada Child Benefit and RRSP Contribution Scenarios

For the scenarios below, I used the government CCB calculator here.

Scenario 1
Family A with 3 kids all under 6 years of age and a family net income of $75,000. They make no RRSP contributions and can expect a total family CCB payment of $11,750 for the year. They can also expect to pay approximately $15,852 in taxes (Ontario).
Assumptions for scenario 1: no RRSP contribution made and no other pension plan contributions.

Scenario 2
Family B with 3 kids under 6 years of age and a family net income of $75,000. If they decide to contribute $13,500 which is their full RRSP contribution room for the year (i.e. 18% x $75,000), their family net income falls to $61,500. They can expect a family CCB payment of $13,215, and will pay approx. $11,814 in taxes (Ontario).
Assumptions for scenario 2: full RRSP contribution made and no other pension plan contributions.

Outcome
Because Family B made RRSP contributions for the previous year, their CCB payments increased by $1,465 for the year or $122/month. Additionally, they will save $1,401 in taxes and at a marginal tax rate of 29.65%, their RRSP contribution will also result in a tax refund of about $4,000.

The scenarios denoted above are somewhat simplistic. However, they clearly show that when it comes to income-tested benefits (such as CCB, GST/HST credit, etc.), there is extra money to be had if your taxable net income is as low as possible.

Closing Thoughts

Saving for retirement is always a good thing! With RRSP contributions, you lower your taxes, get a refund and grow your retirement pot. The new Canada Child Benefit program is especially beneficial to low- and middle-income families.

When you boost your RRSP contributions and increase the CCB you are eligible for, the extra funds received can also be used to build up a family RESP for your children’s future post-secondary education.

It is important to determine what works best for your family when it comes to making RRSP contributions efficiently. For some individuals just starting out in the workforce and currently in a low tax bracket, it may make more sense to carry forward their RRSP contributions until when they are in a higher tax bracket. For some in a higher tax bracket, contributing to a spousal RRSP as a means of income-splitting in retirement may be the savvy thing to do.

Canada Child Benefit: For Who, How and How Much?

The Canada Child Benefit (CCB) is a federal aid program put in place to meet the needs of parents with children under the age of 18. This is an important and valuable source of cash flow because payments are made regularly and are tax-free. How can you find out if you meet the eligibility requirements, and how can you apply?

In 2020, the CCB replaced the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB), National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS) and the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB). Since its launch, more than 23 billion dollars have been paid to more than 3.5 million families. Parents who received the UCCB or the CCTB had their file automatically transferred from the old program to the new one.

How much can you receive from the CCB?

Low-income households are eligible for a yearly maximum allocation of $6,496 for each child under the age of six and $5,481 for each child aged six to seventeen. On average, families benefiting from the CCB receive $6,800 per year in tax-free benefits.

In July 2020, the federal government announced an increase in benefits, a boost welcomed by many parents. As an example, in 2020, a single parent with two children and an income of $35,000 received approximately $11,000 in total benefits. With the new indexation, this same parent receives almost $600 in additional benefits. The benefits will be increased again in 2020.

How often do you receive payments?

The Canada Child Benefit is paid monthly by cheque or direct deposit for a period of 12 months from July to June. You can sign up here to receive an automatic notice via email of payments and credits, which will allow you to better plan your expenses.

The calculation of these payments is renewed each year according to your income tax return and any changes to your familial situation, so it’s important to stay disciplined. If you want to benefit from the CCB, you need to file your taxes on time, even if you have low or no income.

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How can you calculate your family benefits yourself?

To get an estimate of the CCB amounts you are entitled to, you can use the child and family benefits calculator.

By completing a short questionnaire, you will receive both a dollar amount and a relatively accurate overview of your current familial situation. You will be asked, among other things, the name and date of birth of each child under your care and your and your partner’s income. The result, however, does not consider provincial benefits or child disability benefits.

Are you expecting a child?

Firstly, congratulations! If you are the biological mother, you can submit an Automatic Benefits Application. You can register your child for your province on the birth registration form. At the same time, you can fill out applications for the Canada Child Benefit, the GST/HST credit and programs specific to each province and territory.

You can sign up for direct deposit before the birth of your child by visiting the Canada Revenue Agency website.

What happens in the event of a death?

In the event of a death, if the other parent is still the spouse, payments are usually transferred to this person according to their income. However, if the person responsible for the child is neither the mother nor the father, they must contact the Canada Revenue Agency to get a better overview suited to their new reality.

Learn more about the Canada Child Benefit

You can consult the information online on the Government of Canada website. There you will find a variety of information related to child benefits and other connected programs for which you could be eligible, such as the Child Disability Benefit, the Working Income Tax Benefit (if you are a low-income worker) or the Family Caregiver Benefit for Children (for critically ill or injured children).

Obviously, these sums are first allocated for children’s needs, especially for food, clothing and education. In this regard, as in many other cases, your financial advisor can help you optimize your budget and financial strategies.

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Your Canada Child Tax Benefit

    Simon Clark 3 years ago Views:

1 Your Canada Child Tax Benefit Including related provincial and territorial child benefits and credits For the period from July 2003 to June 2004 T4114(E) Rev. 03

2 The National Child Benefit (NCB) is a joint initiative of the federal, provincial, and territorial governments. This initiative is designed to:! help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty;! ensure that families will always be better off as a result of parents working; and! reduce overlap and duplication of government programs and services. For more information, visit the NCB Web site at Visually impaired persons can get our publications in braille, large print, or etext (computer diskette), or on audio cassette by visiting our Web site at or by calling weekdays from 8:15 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time). La version française de cette publication est intitulée Votre prestation fiscale canadienne pour enfants.

3 Table of contents Page Introduction. 4 What is the Canada Child Tax Benefit. 4 Can you get the CCTB. 5 When should you apply. 7 How do you apply. 7 What happens after you apply. 8 How do we calculate your benefit. 9 When do we pay your benefit? When do we recalculate your benefit? When should you contact us? Did the number of children in your care change? Are you moving? Has your marital status changed? Has a CCTB recipient died? Other changes Related provincial and territorial programs administered by the CCRA Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit BC Family Bonus New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit Northwest Territories Child Benefit Nova Scotia Child Benefit Nunavut Child Benefit Saskatchewan Child Benefit Yukon Child Benefit Tax office addresses Do you need more information?

4 Introduction T his pamphlet explains who is eligible for the Canada Child Tax Benefit, how you apply for it, when you get it, and how we calculate it for the period July 2003 June It also gives details about provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs administered by the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA). What is the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB)? T he CCTB is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help eligible families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. Included in the CCTB is the National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS), a monthly benefit for low-income families with children. The NCBS is the Government of Canada s contribution to the National Child Benefit (NCB), a joint initiative of federal, provincial, and territorial governments. As part of the NCB, certain provinces and territories also provide complementary benefits and services for children in low-income families, such as child benefits, earned income supplements, and supplementary health benefits, as well as child care, children-at-risk, and early childhood services. Under proposed changes, a new supplement, the Child Disability Benefit (CDB), will be included with CCTB payments beginning in March The CDB will be paid to families with children who have a severe and prolonged physical or mental impairment. See page 11 for details. 4

5 Can you get the CCTB? T o get the CCTB, all the following conditions must be met. 1) You must live with the child, and the child must be under the age of 18. 2) You must be the person who is primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child. This means you are responsible for such things as supervising the child s daily activities and needs, making sure the child s medical needs are met, and arranging for child care when necessary. If there is a female parent who lives with the child, we usually consider her to be this person. However, if the female parent does not live with the child, it could be the father, a grandparent, or a guardian. 3) You must be a resident of Canada. We consider you to be a resident of Canada when you establish sufficient residential ties in Canada. 4) You or your spouse or common-law partner (defined on page 6) must be: a Canadian citizen; a permanent resident (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act); a protected person (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act); or a temporary resident (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act) who has lived in Canada throughout the previous 18 months. See How do we calculate your benefit? on page 9 for information about other conditions that will determine the amount of your benefit. 5

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6 Children s Special Allowances We pay Children s Special Allowances for children under the age of 18 who are under the care of a government department, agency, or institution. You cannot receive the CCTB for a child for any month in which Children s Special Allowances are payable for that child. Spouse You have a spouse when you are legally married. You are separated if you have been living apart from your spouse for a period of 90 days or more because of a breakdown in your relationship and you have not reconciled. Common-law partner You have a common-law partner and are living common law if you live and have a relationship with a person of the same or opposite sex who is not your spouse, and any of the following applies. He or she:! is the natural or adoptive parent of your child; or! has been living and having a relationship with you for at least 12 continuous months (include any period that you were separated for less than 90 days because of a breakdown in the relationship); or! lived with you previously as your spouse or common-law partner. Under proposed changes, this last condition will no longer apply to 2001 and later years. You are separated if you have been living apart from your common-law partner for a period of 90 days or more because of a breakdown in your relationship and you have not reconciled. 6

7 When should you apply? Y ou should apply for the CCTB as soon as possible after:! your child is born;! a child starts to live with you; or! you become a resident of Canada. You should not delay applying because we make retroactive payments for up to 11 months from the month we receive your application. However, if circumstances beyond your control prevented you from sending us your application on time, you can ask for an extension by attaching a note to your application or writing to your tax office. You will find the tax office addresses on page 23. Note If you are eligible for the CCTB, you should apply even if you think you will not be entitled to receive it based on your current family net income. We recalculate your entitlement every July based on your family net income for the previous year. How do you apply? T o apply for the CCTB, complete Form RC66, Canada Child Tax Benefit Application. Depending on your immigration and residency status, you may also have to complete the schedule Status in Canada/Statement of Income. You need to attach proof of birth for your child to your application if we have not previously paid CCTB to anyone for this child, and your child was born outside Canada or your child is one year of age or older. 7

8 If you and your spouse or common-law partner were residents of Canada for any part of 2002, you must both file a 2002 return before we can calculate your benefit. To continue getting the CCTB, you both have to file a return every year you are residents of Canada, even if you have no income to report. If your spouse or common-law partner is a non-resident of Canada, you must complete Form CTB9, Canada Child Tax Benefit Statement of Income for each year he or she is a non-resident of Canada. Note In cases of separation or divorce, it is possible that both parents share more or less equally in the care and upbringing of a child. If each parent wants to apply for CCTB benefits for alternating six-month periods, attach a note to the application to clearly indicate the request. Both parents must sign the note and application. If you have questions, call What happens after you apply? Y ou can expect to hear from us before the end of the second month after we get your application. For example, if we get your application in August, you can expect to hear from us before the end of October. If your application is not complete, we will ask for the missing information. This will delay processing your application. After we process your application, we will send you a Canada Child Tax Benefit Notice. It will tell how much you will get, if any, and what information we used to calculate the amount. 8

9 We may review your situation at a later date to confirm that the information you gave us has not changed. Note Keep your Canada Child Tax Benefit Notice in case you need to refer to it when you contact us. You may also have to provide information from your notice to other federal, provincial, or territorial government departments. How do we calculate your benefit? T he CCTB combines a basic benefit, a National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS), and under proposed changes, a Child Disability Benefit supplement. For the period July 2003 to June 2004, we calculate your benefit based on:! the number of children you have, and their ages;! your province or territory of residence;! your family net income for 2002;! your or your spouse or common-law partner s claim for child care expenses for 2002; and! under proposed changes, your child s eligibility for the Child Disability Benefit. See page 11 for details. Family net income Family net income is your net income added to the net income of your spouse or common-law partner, if you have one. Family net income does not include your child s net income. Net income is the amount on line 236 of a person s return. 9

10 If you or your spouse or common-law partner were non-residents of Canada for part or all of the year, family net income includes your or your spouse or common-law partner s income for any part of the year you were not residents of Canada. Child and family benefits online calculator You can use our new online service to get an estimate of your child and family benefits by visiting our Web site at Basic benefit We calculate the basic benefit as described below:! $97.41 per month for each child under the age of 18 (if you live in Alberta, see the note below);! an additional $6.83 per month for your third and each additional child; and! an additional $19.33 per month for each child under the age of seven. This amount is reduced by 25% of any amount you or your spouse or common-law partner claimed for child care expenses for We reduce the basic benefit if your family net income is more than $33,487. For a family with one child, the reduction is 2.5% of the amount of family net income that is more than $33,487. For families with two or more children, the reduction is 5%. Note The Alberta provincial government has chosen to vary the amount of the basic benefit their residents get. The basic monthly benefit is:! $89.25 for children under 7;! $95.25 for children 7 to 11;! $ for children 12 to 15; and! $ for children 16 or

11 National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS) The NCBS amounts are:! $ per month for the first child;! $ per month for the second child; and! $98.00 per month for each additional child. The NCBS will be reduced by a percentage of family net income that is more than $21,529. For a family with one child, the reduction is 12.2% of the amount of family net income that is more than $21,529; for a family with two children, the reduction is 22.7%; and for families with three or more children, the reduction is 32.6%. Note If you are on social assistance, the NCBS may affect the amount of your social assistance payments. Many provinces and territories will consider the NCBS you get as income and will adjust your basic social assistance by this amount. Others may adjust their basic social assistance rates by using the maximum NCBS amount. Child Disability Benefit Under proposed changes, families with low or modest incomes with children who qualify for the disability amount are eligible to receive a Child Disability Benefit (CDB) supplement with their CCTB. A child qualifies for the disability amount when we have approved Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for that child. For families with children who qualify for the disability amount, the CDB is calculated automatically. Families will continue to be able to claim the disability amount and corresponding supplement on their return for qualifying children. For more information on the disability amount, visit our Web site at or see the T.I.P.S. (Tax Information Phone Service) and T.I.P.S. Online section on the back cover of this pamphlet. 11

12 The first CDB payments will be included with the March 2004 CCTB payments. Eligible families will receive a retroactive payment for the July 2003 to March 2004 period. The CDB will provide up to a maximum of $ per month to families with an eligible child with a qualifying disability based on family net income. For more information about the CDB, visit our Web site at or call When do we pay your benefit? W e generally pay your benefit on the 20th of each month. However, if your monthly entitlement is less than $10, we will make only one payment to cover the period July 2003 to June 2004, on July 18, If you haven t received your payment by the 20th of any month, please wait five working days before calling us. Direct deposit You can have your CCTB payments deposited directly into your account at a financial institution. To start direct deposit, complete the Direct deposit section on Form RC66, Canada Child Tax Benefit Application, or send us a completed Form T1-DD(1), Direct Deposit Request Individuals. To get Form T1-DD(1), visit our Web site at or call

13 When do we recalculate your benefit? W e will recalculate your benefit and send you a Canada Child Tax Benefit Notice showing our revised calculation:! every July based on the returns that you and your spouse or common-law partner filed for the previous year;! after each reassessment of either your or your spouse or common-law partner s return that affects the calculation of your benefit;! after a child for whom you receive the CCTB turns 18 (the last payment you will receive will be for the month of his or her birthday); and! after you tell us about changes to your situation that could affect your benefit (see the next section). When should you contact us? A fter you have applied for the CCTB, you should let us know as soon as possible of certain changes, as well as the date they happened or will happen. This section explains how you should tell us about these changes. Note For confidentiality reasons, we can only discuss a file with the person who receives the CCTB. However, we can speak with someone else if the CCTB recipient sends us written permission naming the person they would like us to deal with. 13

14 Did the number of children in your care change? If your child is born or a child starts to live with you, you will need to apply for the CCTB for that child. For details, see How do you apply? on page 7. If a child for whom you were receiving the benefit is no longer in your care, stops living with you, or dies, call to let us know. Are you moving? If you move, be sure to let us know. Otherwise, your payments may stop, whether you receive them by cheque or by direct deposit. To change your address, use our online service at or call Has your marital status changed? If your marital status changes, be sure to let us know, as this may affect the amount of CCTB to which you are entitled. Complete Form RC65, Marital Status Change, or tell us in a letter of your new status and the date of the change. If you are now married or living common law, also include your spouse or common-law partner s name, address, and social insurance number. You and your spouse or common-law partner must sign the form or letter. Send the form or letter to one of the tax offices listed on page 23. Has a CCTB recipient died? If a CCTB recipient dies, the next of kin or the estate should inform us in writing. Someone else may be eligible to get the benefits for the child. Send the letter to one of the tax offices listed on page

15 Other changes Call to tell us:! if your or your spouse or common-law partner s immigration or residency status changes; or! if any of the personal information, such as marital status or child information, shown on your Canada Child Tax Benefit Notice is incorrect. Direct deposit If you get your payments by direct deposit and your banking information changes, send us a completed Form T1-DD(1), Direct Deposit Request Individuals. To get Form T1-DD(1), visit our Web site at or call Related provincial and territorial programs administered by the CCRA T he CCRA administers the following provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs:! Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit;! BC Family Bonus;! New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit;! Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit;! Northwest Territories Child Benefit;! Nova Scotia Child Benefit;! Nunavut Child Benefit;! Saskatchewan Child Benefit; and! Yukon Child Benefit. 15

16 You do not need to apply separately for these benefits. We use the information from your CCTB application to determine your eligibility for these programs. If you are eligible, the amount of your payments will be calculated based on information from the tax returns you and your spouse or common-law partner file. If you use the direct deposit service for your CCTB payments, we will deposit payments from these programs into the same account. Note Earned income and working income used in the calculation of certain provincial and territorial benefits includes income from employment, self-employment, training allowances, scholarships, research grants, and disability payments received under the Canada Pension Plan and the Quebec Pension Plan. If you live in Quebec, we will automatically send all information needed for the Quebec family allowance to the Régie des rentes du Québec. We will send this information whether or not you are entitled to the CCTB. If you live in Ontario, we will automatically send the information needed for the Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families to the Ontario Ministry of Finance. Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit The Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit is a non-taxable amount paid to families with working income that have children under the age of

17 You may be entitled to receive whichever of the following three amounts is the least:! $500 ($41.66 per month) for each child under age 18;! $1,000 ($83.33 per month); or! 8% of your family s working income that is more than $6,500. The credit is reduced by 4% of the amount of family net income that is more than $25,000. Payments are made in July 2003 and January This program is fully funded by the Province of Alberta. Payments are issued separately from the CCTB. For more information, call BC Family Bonus The BC Family Bonus program includes the basic Family Bonus and the BC Earned Income Benefit. This program provides non-taxable amounts paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Basic Family Bonus For families with net income below $20,500, the basic Family Bonus provides the following amounts:! $1.58 per month for the first child;! $17.75 per month for the second child; and! $23.83 per month for each additional child. 17

18 Families whose net income is $20,500 or more may also be entitled to a basic Family Bonus amount depending on their net income and the number of children they have. BC Earned Income Benefit Families whose earned income is more than $3,750 may also be entitled to the following:! up to $50.41 per month for the first child;! up to $33.75 per month for the second child; and! up to $27.50 per month for each additional child. Families whose net income is more than $20,921 may get part of the earned income benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of British Columbia. For more information, call New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit The New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit (NBCTB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under the age of 18. The New Brunswick Working Income Supplement (NBWIS) is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with earned income who have children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the NBCTB, you may be entitled to a basic benefit of $20.83 per month for each child. The amount of the basic benefit is reduced if your family net income is more than $20,

19 The NBWIS is an additional benefit of up to $20.83 per month. It is phased in once family earned income is more than $3,750 and reaches the maximum benefit when family earned income is $10,000. Families with net income between $20,921 and $25,921 may get part of the supplement. This program is fully funded by the Province of New Brunswick. For more information, call Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit The Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit (NLCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low-income families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. The Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement (MBNS) is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families who have children under the age of one. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the NLCB, you may be entitled to a benefit of:! $18 per month for the first child;! $26 per month for the second child;! $28 per month for the third child; and! $30 per month for each additional child. Families with net income between $17,397 and $22,397 may get part of the benefit. Under the MBNS, you may be entitled to a benefit of $45 per month for each child under the age of one if your family net income is under $22,

20 This program is fully funded by the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. For more information, call Northwest Territories Child Benefit The Northwest Territories Child Benefit (NWTCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under the age of 18. The Territorial Worker s Supplement, part of the NWTCB program, is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with working income who have children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the NWTCB, you may be entitled to a basic benefit of $27.50 per month for each child. Families who have earned income of more than $3,750 may also get the Territorial Worker s Supplement of up to $22.91 per month for one child, and up to $29.16 per month for two or more children. Families with net incomes above $20,921 may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Northwest Territories. For more information, call Nova Scotia Child Benefit The Nova Scotia Child Benefit (NSCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. 20

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21 Under the NSCB, you may be entitled to a benefit of:! $37.08 per month for the first child;! $53.75 per month for the second child; and! $60.00 per month for each additional child. Families with net income between $16,000 and $20,921 may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of Nova Scotia. For more information, call Nunavut Child Benefit The Nunavut Child Benefit (NUCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under the age of 18. The Territorial Worker s Supplement, part of the NUCB program, is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with working income who have children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the NUCB, you may be entitled to a basic benefit of $27.50 per month for each child. Families who have earned income of more than $3,750 may also get the Territorial Worker s Supplement of up to $22.91 per month for one child, and up to $29.16 per month for two or more children. Families with net income above $20,921 may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by Nunavut. For more information, call

22 Government of Saskatchewan Saskatchewan Child Benefit The Saskatchewan Child Benefit (SCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help lower-income families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the SCB, you may be entitled to a benefit of $42 per year for the first child, $255 per year for the second child, and $330 per year for each additional child. Families with net income above $15,921 may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of Saskatchewan. For families living on a reserve, benefits are funded by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. For more information, call Yukon Child Benefit The Yukon Child Benefit (YCB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the YCB, you may be entitled to a benefit of $25 per month for each child. Families with net income above $16,700 may get part of the benefit. This program is funded by the Yukon with a contribution from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada on behalf of Status Indian children. For more information, call

23 Tax office addresses I f you need to send us a letter, use one of the addresses shown below: St. John s Tax Centre PO Box 12071, Stn A St. John s NL A1B 3Z1 Summerside Tax Centre Pope Road Summerside PE C1N 5Z7 Jonquière Tax Centre PO Box 1900, Stn LCD Jonquière QC G7S 5J1 Shawinigan-Sud Tax Centre PO Box 3000, Stn Main Shawinigan-Sud QC G9N 7S6 Sudbury Tax Services Office PO Box 20000, Stn A Sudbury ON P3A 5C1 Winnipeg Tax Centre PO Box 14000, Stn Main Winnipeg MB R3C 3M2 Surrey Tax Centre 9755 King George Highway Surrey BC V3T 5E1 23

The Canada Child Benefit (CCB) Explained

Last Updated: May 24, 2020

Let’s face it, having kids is an expensive proposition. Because of this, the federal government provides eligible families with a monthly tax-free payment, to help shoulder the costs.

Aptly titled the Canada Child Benefit, or CCB, the funds can be used in any number of ways, at the parent’s discretion.

For our government, it’s considered money well spent. After all, they have a vested interest in the success of an entire generation of young Canadians.

So whether the extra money is spent on groceries, to cover the cost of soccer registration, or placed into long-term savings, their goal is simple: To help Canadian families manage the high costs of raising kids.

How Does the CCB Work?

In a way, the CCB is the product of two previous government benefits, namely the longstanding Canada Child Tax Benefit, or CCTB, and the separate Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), which was originally introduced in 2006.

The CCB replaced both the CCTB and UCCB in 2020.

Unlike the UCCB, that paid a fixed amount each month to Canadian parents of all income levels, the CCB is income-tested. This means that it’s designed to provide a larger benefit to lower income Canadians.

Conversely, as a family’s income grows, the monthly CCB payment decreases, until it is no longer available to parents at the highest income levels.

For the lowest income families, the maximum benefit is currently $6400 per child under the age of 6, and $5400 for children between the age of 6 and 17.

The government reports that on average, CCB-eligible families receive approximately $6800 per year in benefits.

Updates to the CCB for 2020-19

Beginning in July 2020, the CCB benefit will be indexed to inflation, meaning that annual benefits will grow in line with the increase to the cost of living.

Here’s an example. For 2020-19, the government has set indexation at 1.5%, and is projecting an increase of 2.0% for 2020-20.

Using these numbers, a family currently receiving an annual benefit of $6400 can expect an increase to $6496 for 2020-19, and $6,626 for 2020-2020, should remain in line with current projections.

Is The CCB Taxable?

Another way that the CCB benefit differs from the UCCB is its tax-free status. The UCCB was considered taxable income, reported by the parent. For married or common-law couples, the lower income earning spouse reported any UCCB income received. CCB income is non-taxable.

Additional CCB Benefits

Some families may qualify for additional benefits included with the CCB, namely the child disability benefit as well as a number of provincial and territorial benefits.

Important Canada Child Benefit Dates

When factoring the CCB benefit into your family’s budget, there are some key dates to keep in mind.

For starters, the monthly CCB payment resets every July and is based on a family’s net income from the previous year.

The annual benefit is divided into twelve equal payments, beginning in July and continuing through to the following June.

It’s also important to note that CCB payments are made on the 20th of every month.

CCB Eligibility

To be eligible for the CCB, there are a number of conditions you must meet.

For starters, you need to live with the child, and the child must be under 18 years of age. You must be the child’s primary caregiver, as well as a resident of Canada.

Finally, providing you are the parent, spouse, or common-law partner, you must be a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for the previous 18 months.

You need to file a tax return each year if you want this benefit. Even if you don’t have any income to report, you should still file a tax return so that you can continue receiving the Canada Child Benefit. If you fail to file, CCB payments will cease.

How To Register Your Newborn For The CCB

Providing you are the birth mother, and you haven’t already completed an application, CRA makes it easy for new parents to apply for the CCB.

It’s called the Automated Benefits Application. Here’s how it works.

At the time you register the birth of your newborn with your province, you can consent to have your birth registration information shared securely with the Canada Revenue Agency.

There will be a section in the birth registration that allows for this.

You will need to provide your Social Insurance Number when submitting the application, but once it’s sent, the CCB application process is complete.

If you don’t provide your consent, it means that you will need to apply for the CCB separately.

Other Ways To Apply For The CCB

If you did not use the Automated Benefits Application, there are two other ways you can apply to receive the CCB.

My Account

Using the “My Account” service through CRA’s website, you can choose an option to “Apply for Child Benefits”. From there, you will need to confirm your marital status, contact information, as well as your citizenship. You will also enter your child’s personal information.

Once you’ve submitted your application, CRA will allow you to return anytime to check the status of your application.

Form RC66

If you haven’t either of the above options, you can apply by filling out CRA Form RC66.

A link to this form can be found here.

You will be required to provide supporting documentation in the following circumstances:

If you share custody of a child, need to provide proof of birth, if you are applying for a period of time which began more than 11 months ago, or lastly, if you or your spouse or common-law partner are a new, or returning resident, or citizen of Canada.

The Canada Child Benefit Calculator

On their website, the CRA allows families to see what their CCB benefits might look like, using this interactive calculator.

Simply input the birthdates of your children, as well as some basic income information for you and your spouse, and the calculator will figure out the rest. It’s a great tool, and only takes a few minutes to use.

Ways To Use Your CCB Benefit

As a parent, how you allot your CCB payments is up to you. But if you are looking to place the funds into long-term savings for your child, there are options. I’ve highlighted a few here:

Contribute To Your Child’s RESP

One of the most effective ways to save for your child’s education is through a Registered Education Savings Plan, or RESP. Through the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG), the government provides a 20% match on annual RESP contributions, to a maximum of $500 per child.

If you’re not already maximizing your contributions, consider topping them up with monies from the CCB. Another huge benefit of an RESP is that it offers tax-sheltered growth for the duration of the plan, until the funds are withdrawn.

Contribute to an RDSP

If your child has a prolonged physical or mental disability and qualifies for the Disability Tax Credit, they may be eligible to open an Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP).

Similar to other registered savings plans, the RDSP offers tax-sheltered growth, and the contributions are eligible to be matched by the government through the Canada Disability Savings Grant as well as Canada Disability Savings Bonds.

Investing For Your Child

Funds that originate from a CCB payment can be invested in the child’s name, without the income being attributed back to the parent.

This provides an opportunity to shelter additional investment income, outside of an RESP or RDSP account.

Because presumably, your child will have little to no employment income to declare, their basic personal amount ($11,635) should eliminate any potential tax owing on investment income earned.

Summary

If you qualify for the Canada Child Benefit and are not currently receiving it, you may be missing out on a valuable source of income that can provide a much needed boost to your family’s financial well being.

A good idea is to start with the previously mentioned CCB calculator, which will help to determine your potential benefit. From there, simply select your preferred application method and you’ll be well on your way.

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About Tom Drake

Tom Drake is the owner and head writer of the award-winning MapleMoney. With a career as a Financial Analyst and over a decade writing about personal finance, Tom has the knowledge to help you get control of your money and make it work for you.

Write Your Comments

Comments

Hi i am 29 migrated to Canada on 5th Oct 2015 .I submitted child benefit form recently and i got a mail from CRA (I am not sure if it is related to CCB) stating that below
Goods and services tax/Harmonized sales tax creditGST/HSTC notice

WE cannot calculate the amount you may be entitled to recieve all periods because we do not have all the necessary info.If you provide the info we ask for in the detailsed exp seciton we iwll process and let you know if you are entitle

I have no clue if it is related to CCB or no what do i do next and how do i ensure that they are processing my CCB?

I sent in everything they asked gor for 6 years . Better get this progono Lawyer Tax services because they are taking still from me … Is ut mu fault mu daughter was Kidnapped … This is a joke ….

My phone needs repair sorry
Slowly Now
I sent everything they asked of me for 6 years My daughter turns 6 in sept. …
One representitative says one thing another says another thing i sent for 6 years doctors letters My own letters court orders because My daughter was Kidnapped from me for papers My ex wanted papers into The country … She is with me i Pay rent for her she is on My benefits i sent them everything they asked for that i can send after The Kidnapping of My daughter shame on The Ontario canada Revenue agency . For these things .. Unexpected… i have to pay forever for what ? You say I must pay when she was gone you took it all already the 3rd year it’s paid the lump sum to this day i get letters saying I owe money but for what . tell My and my daughters doctor years to make letters and other people shame on them . That IT had come to taking away money from her for what . Her and my misfortune ?? Wow how low can the government go . This is for herrrrrr not me .
Geez I don’t understand I sent in everything they then ask for the different specific dates here’s something weird I have a letter stating from my doctor n court order she was with me from when she got back to April 2015 where I gave him a second chance they told me to have me Doctor write those dates now they ask for Sec. To match but I have dec to April .. Haloooo march is before April . Are they that evil .

Yes they are and they lie too

I had an issue with CRA and my daughter, they wanted proof I was really a single mom. After fighting for months and sending everything in they still wanted more. I ended up going to a local MP and made them a representative on my behalf. They had it sorted in 48 hours. Maybe try your local MP?

Going thru the same thing but as a single father. 6 months into this whole deal and I’ve submitted everything above and beyond the expectations. From police officer signed letters to daycare to sport coaches to all medical and dental bills, school address. And many more. The funny thing is I’m only Looking to claim 50% ( in reality it’s almost full time but wanted to make it easy and not cause a war with ex) but retroactive since my separation 8 years ago. Keep in mind CCB told me to do this. I’m exactly 6 months in and I’m still calling daily just to show them I’m not giving up. Every call answered by them is a different answer to what’s going on. Anyways I’m pretty sure I’m going to be shut down again. Any suggestions or case familiarities that would give a suggestion at this point would be appreciated

I was meaning to say they said dec2012 she was with me to april 2015 where i gave Him a second chance to try to be a father ( worse choice ever )joint was dated April 2nd 2015 and sent court order doctors letter everything, everything they asked for and they Said dec 2012 to march 2015 after . what do they want our soul or into our / My home ?? Seriouslyyyy . What else do they want Now they say Dec 2012 TO march 2015 but march is before april … I don’t want to again ask My doctor The 6th time please make a letter please this way they don’t believe and after give me a different date again for The 3rd time …are they crazy . Hello she was Kidnapped from me and brought back i have documrnts i sent a million times I your computerss Now what do they want to suck us dry because they can . no a probono Lawyer, Their services .

Will we recieve back pay from jan to june 2020 or are the current new payments all we are getting starting july? I’ver heard different things and my account only shows the current amount being deposited july 20 and nothing else.

my child is 19 and in school is she still eligable for benefits

Rosemarie Godina says

How many families who make above the threshold for the child care tax credits will no longer receive the funding? In the GTA, $203K is not a lot of money when you are supporting a family. And how do we know that child tax benefits even go to children to improve their quality of life? How will this be measured?

Can anyone tell me if you can get the cctb in a lump sum? Just curious if that’s a possibility.

maybe you shoukd get off your ass and get a job lady.

I have been working since I was 15, what the hell is YOUR excuse.

We have all been working since we were kids; paper routes, cafes, transitioning into college or full time jobs. These jobs do not even begin to compete with everyday living costs; rent, groceries, bills etc. Did you know that Canadians in BC are putting 90% of their earned money to putting a roof over their head?! This is ludicrous, and the government has done nothing to help fix this issue for over 8 years. Minimum wage has gone from $7.15 in 1998 to $10.45 in 2020, while housing has dramatically increased by 500%!! Even so called good paying jobs at $45,000K per year are a poor mans salary now.

When is income tax due in order to recieve child tax for May 2020

Maybe you should walk a mile in someone else’s shoes before believing you are better than anyone else. We all have stories, some are horrific.

Lucy your comment I’d derogatory and judgemental. I do agree that there are many people who could work and chose not to, costing taxpayers a significant amount of money. However Lucy there are situations that the person may have just left a relationship where the spouse earned the money. Someone could be waiting to be approved for disability for either physical and or mental health. Someone could have just lost their loved one who was they was the financial provider. Could be a teen leaving an abusive home and or lost both parents and FACS may not be able to house them. I could give you plenty more examples Lucy but hopefully you’re starting to get my point regarding your derogatory judgements of others. Want social reform start demanding that your federal and provincial officials start investing more into community services by hiring more people for starters, to ensure that the lengthy wait lists that discourage others from accessing supports is reduced significantly. Inest in better wages for people to encourage more people to seek employment as people are not eager to work to still not make ends meet. Also happy people are more productive and more likely to stay with a job and be significantly more reliable. These are just some starting points that you could address to help expand the number of people employeed and also to help those with social deficiencies achieve a healthier lifestyle. Degrading people without looking at the larger picture and contributing factors will not changethings for the better but rather keep those people down.

that is such an ignorant thing to say. people that work get this , its based on family size and income. the lowest income getting the highest and the more you make it goes down . alot of people have worked since they were 15 wtf does that have to do with anything?

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what if the kids didnt get his cctb since birth and his five years now and his going to file Can he still get backpay from 1-4 years?

I’m wondering the same thing…anyone have an answer?

Yes, you will get back pay for all those years.

Brigitta pelcz says

Why is this taken off my welfare check how can i survive on 456 dollas plus 400 child rax. Horrible. How is this helping children.

Hello im filing my taxes late, but the question is, do i have to fill out another CCTB form and send it off with my taxes as well, as of 2020 to receive CCTB through out the rest of the year, which my child has been under my care and collecting it since the day he was born?

Hello, I fell behind in registering my son for CCTB and Universal Ben. He is now 6 years of age. I’ve recently applied for the new CCB. Would I also receive a retro-active amount for the 6 years? Is that possible?

Gary Norton says

My income is less then half of last year can I get my child tax benefits changed to relate to income I have now?

Could some one help me I had Gotton married last year my husband has no income I am the only one working And they stop my child benifit right after I told them that I was married Why ? I was como on law before but I was raising. My kid alone with I still do and they ask me for paper I give them and they is always something missing why? Plus on top of that I have to pay back money even though iam the only one. Supporting the family that not right iam running out of money pl help

They changed the rules in 2011 to punish parents that are single, divorced or gay. I haven’t got CTB in 7 years and had to pay around $2000/yr. My spouse works but I haven’t been working since a work place accident on the farm. We can thank Steven Harper for this. There are many low income families being audited and refused CTB. When you talk to the CRA they tell you a different thing every time. When you “prove” you have kids,a spouse and a home they’ll say you missed something. They suggested I have a clergy member or priest verify my claim. It’s frustrating and putting me in debt. I’ve filed a complaint with the ombudsman but their office has no authority. The Canadian government should be ashamed. The system is very descriminating to the people that need it the most.

I am interested in this. I have a 1 year old son, the father and I are not together as a couple but we live in the same house (one lives up, one lives down). We share the mortgage as we own the house together but I pay for the child, he does not. We have a mutual agreement, no custody papers, we are good friends. We live together to save money, its too expensive to live separately with a baby. CRA is asking for proof that I am a single parent. I do my taxes single as does the father. We are not together, other than owning a home together that we both share in separate suites. It sounds ridiculous in writing but it works well for us. Can I still get my child benefits in full or will CRA consider us a couple, even though we are not? Thanks for advice!

MARIEL LARIOSA says

Hi I need some facts on this situation. I am married with two sons, the oldest is with us here in Edmonton. we landed here as PR. I also applied for CCTB last August. How would I know that the government received already my application? How long can we can get his benefits?
Now, my youngest is only 7 months old not living with us, he is in our country of origin (Philippines). He is included and declared with the documents we processed for the immigration. he is done with the medical exam, passport, and included my list of dependents. The only thing he do not have immigrant visa, we did not apply for him because we do not know when we can get him (settled here and have jobs). I would like to know if he can still avail the CCBT even if he is in the Philippines and of course he has no SIN. Is he qualified for CCBT? and be offset when he arrives here in Edmonton, Alberta? Please I need information regarding our situation. Thank you very much.

Glenda fox says

I have been on my own since I was 12 yrs old. Couch surfing, homeless.. I’m now an adult with 2 children but only 1 is in my care and oldest is under her dad. Someone told me I can get backpay for all those years no one was collecting for me. I was wondering if it is true and how I would go about getting backpay?

My ex is receiving half of my baby bonus now and the government is making me pay back half of what I received over the past year. He has my son 30% of the time and I have him 70%. He pays child support, why should he have his support payed for by the government while taking away money I need for my 6 year old!? Please help!

If the baby bonus goes by income and I get 530 now, when i have another baby do i also get another 530 or does it go down from the first baby bonus? Does it count as income? Please reply if you can

Concerned mom says

I have been receiving the Child tax benefit for 11 years – but I did not receive the payment for October 2020. I just got married to a Non-Canadian & reported it to CRA, he makes zero $ in Canada. Why didn’t I get the $$ no notice no phone call or letter: (( I rely on that money, it really helps

Hi I have a question? It is ok to collect or to recieve the cctb even the children is out in the country? Like I know someone who is CANADIAN citizen but married to an armed officer in India so she has been staying in India since then. The thing is that she only give birth the baby here in Canada and after 3 months or so she take her child to India and keep living there.. And she continue recieving the cctb since then, is this ok? Or no? and if not what is the penelaty for it ? She have 2 children who are canadian by birth but living with her and her husband in india. Just asking.

Пособия на детей в Канаде. Полезная информация для новых иммигрантов.

Средства для выплаты пособия на детей в Канаде формируются на двух уровнях – федеральном и провинциальном. При этом, для упрощения бюрократического процесса, все выплаты и программы координируются налоговой службой Канады( Canadian Revenue Agency). Т.е. подачей всего одного заявления (application) семья может оформиться на все существующие программы. И, как следствие, все причитающиеся выплаты будут перечисляться одним платежом раз в месяц.
Для заинтересованных только в скачивании и заполнении необходимых форм без вдавания в подробности, рекомендую сразу перейти ко второй части.

Часть 1.

Немного теории.
Средства для выплаты пособия на детей в Канаде формируются на двух уровнях – федеральном и провинциальном. При этом, для упрощения бюрократического процесса, все выплаты и программы координируются налоговой службой Канады( Canadian Revenue Agency). Т.е. подачей всего одного заявления (application) семья может оформиться на все существующие программы. И, как следствие, все причитающиеся выплаты будут перечисляться одним платежом раз в месяц.
К федеральным программам относятся следующие:

1) Canada child tax benefit (CCTB) –освобожденные от налогообложения ежемесячные выплаты на детей до 18 лет, рассчитываемые в зависимости от дохода семьи, количества детей и провинции проживания.
2) Universal child care benefit (UCCB) – включаемые в налогооблагаемый доход 100 долларов в месяц на каждого ребенка до 6 лет вне зависимости от дохода семьи.
Под CCTB обычно имеют ввиду один платеж в месяц, но следует иметь ввиду, что CCTB может состоять из совокупности нескольких программ:
– Basic CCTB – собственно основная часть пособия
— National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS) – дополнительная часть пособия, ориентированная на семьи с низким доходом
— Child disability benefit (CDB) –дополнительные выплаты на содержание детей-инвалидов.

Как я уже сказал выше, CCTB напрямую зависит от количества детей, их возраста, провинции проживания и чистого дохода семьи (family net income) за прошлый год. Если максимально упростить определение, то family net income – это совокупный доход каждого из супругов за вычетом всех предусмотренных налоговым законодательством вычетов, используемых для подсчета. Эти вычеты могут быть как несколько сотен, так и несколько десятков тысяч в зависимости от каждого конкретного случая. Список этих вычетов можно посмотреть здесь .

Для получения CCTB требуется соответствовать следующим требованиям:
1) Ребенок должен быть в возрасте до 18 лет и физически проживать с родителем-заявителем.
2) Заявитель должен быть непосредственно ответственным за непосредственную заботу о ребенке (обычно под этим определением предполагается мать ребенка).
3) Завитель должен иметь легальный иммиграционный статус и попадать под категорию канадского налогового резидента (иммигранты со статусом PR становятся налоговыми резидентами со дня «залендивания»).

Процесс рассчета пособия учитывает ряд факторов, включая провинцию проживания (многие провинции, включая Альберту, имеют свои собственные программы, дополняющие федеральные), количество и возраст детей, период рассчета ежегодного пособия ( с 1 июля по 30 июня) , для которого требуется указать доход обоих супругов за 2 предыдущих года, соответственно и т.п. В связи с этим, налоговая служба рекомендует пользоваться очень полезным калькулятором .

Например для гипотетической семьи резидентов Альберы с 2-мя детьми до 7 лет и доходом 25 тыс (20 на мужа и 5 на жену) ежемесячное пособие будет составлять $616.42 .
Эта сумма будет состоять из следующих программ: CCTB- $204.66, NCBS-$301.35 и Альбертийская провинциальная программа (AFET) – $110.41.
Кроме того, как уже отмечено выше, существует дополнительная выплата UCCB — $100 в месяц на ребенка. Эти 100 долларов являются налогооблагаемыми деньгами, поэтому рекомендуется при заполнении налоговой декларации включать их в доход супруга с меньшим доходом. На это пособие подавать отдельное заявление не требуется.

Часть 2.

Оформление заявления на пособия для детей для новых иммигрантов.
При “залендивании”со статусом Permanent Resident на таможне обычно дают полный пакет необходимых заявлений, в том числе и на пособия для детей. Обязательно поинтересуйтесь этим вопросом при оформлении документов в аэропорту по прибытию. В любом случае, все необходимые формы можно скачать в интернете. Для подачи на пособие Вам понадобятся:

1) Social Insurance Number. Не откладывайте с его получением, тем более, что самой карточки ждать не надо. Сам номер вам дадут практически сразу при оформлении в одном из центров Service Canada.
2) Форма RC 66 . Это собственно само заявление на пособие . К нему нужно будет приложить двухсторонние копии Confirmation of Permanent Residence на каждого ребенка (белые бумажки, на которых иммиграционный офицер в аэропорту ставит свою подпись после окончания процедуры «залендивания», так называемые простыни).
3) Если вы планируете получать пособие прямо на банковский счет (очень рекомендую), а не чеком по почте, то надо заполнить форму T1-DD . Для этого, соответственно, нужно иметь счет в канадском банке.
4) Форма. Эта форма требуется для подтверждения вашего иммиграционного статуса, дохода за текущий год до периода становления налоговым резидентом Канады, и дохода за два предыдущих года. Никаких других подтверждений дохода предоставлять не нужно. Чтобы посчитать кросс курс вашей национальной валюты и канадского доллара используются таблицы, любезно предоставленные Центральным банком Канады. Вам будут нужны среднегодовые (annual averages) курсы для годовых доходов и среднемесячные (monthly averages) для подсчета дохода за текущий год.

Все эти документы надо будет выслать в офис налоговой службы соответственной провинции проживания. Для Альберты это будет Winnipeg Tax Centre, PO Box 14005 Stn Main, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 0E3

Сразу же рекомендуется заполнить и выслать форму на возврат GST налога т.н. GST credit (об этом более подробно позже, т.к. этот платеж к детским пособиям не относится, но все новоприбывшие иммигранты имеют право на его получение. Деньги небольшие, но полезные:)

Чтобы продолжать получать детские пособия и GST credit требуется подача ежегодной налоговой декларации (при подаче декларации так же можно списать ряд расходов на содержание детей, но об этом в следующих статьях).

После подачи первой декларации (которая обязательно должна быть в бумажном варианте), последуюшие декларации можно будет подавать электронно. Так же можно будет открыть свой account на сайте канадской налоговой службы (что намного упростит подачу деклараций, изменений к ним, заявлений на детские и другие пособия и т.п.).

Вопросы по заполнению форм можно задавать прямо здесь. Всем удачи.

Backgrounder: Strengthening the Canada Child Benefit

The Government’s plan to strengthen the middle class and grow the economy is working. Since November 2015, the Canadian economy has created nearly 600,000 jobs and the unemployment rate is near its lowest point in 40 years.

Canada has had the fastest-growing economy among Group of Seven (G7) countries. Canadians are feeling more optimistic about their future and the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) is a key part of this. The International Monetary Fund has specifically cited the CCB as having contributed to the revitalization of the Canadian economy following a downturn in 2015.

Through Budget 2020, the Government is taking the next step to help grow the economy in a way that strengthens the middle class—starting with those working hard to join it.

Building on a Stronger Canada Child Benefit

Introduced in 2020, the CCB is a key initiative of the Government to strengthen the middle class and help those working hard to join it by putting more money in the pockets of those who need it most. Through the CCB, nine out of 10 families now receive more than they did under the previous benefit system.

Whether the extra money is used for things such as after-school care, tutoring or a new pair of winter boots, the CCB helps parents with the high costs of raising their kids.

The CCB Provides Greater Support for Single Mothers

Myriam is a single mother of two children aged 5 and 8. Her net income was $35,000 in 2020. Myriam’s family will have received $11,125 in tax-free CCB payments in the 2020–18 benefit year, $3,535 more than she would have received under the old system of child benefits.

Last year, single mothers earning less than $60,000 a year received about $9,000 in tax-free benefit payments on average to help make things like healthy food, summer programs and winter clothes more affordable.

New in Budget 2020

The Government is taking action to help ensure that everyone who qualifies for support receives it. The Government recognizes that Indigenous communities—and in particular remote and northern Indigenous communities—face distinct barriers to accessing federal benefits such as the CCB. To close this gap, the Government will expand outreach efforts to all on-reserve, remote and northern Indigenous communities, and pilot outreach activities for urban Indigenous communities—so that Indigenous Peoples are better able to access the full range of federal programs, including the CCB.

  • simple—families receive a single payment every month
  • tax-free—families do not have to pay back part of the amount received when they file their tax returns
  • targeted to those who need it most—low- and middle-income families get higher payments, and those with the highest incomes receive less than under the previous system of child benefits
  • generous—on average, families benefitting from the CCB receive about $6,800 in CCB payments annually.

The CCB provides greater support to those who need it most: low- and middle-income families. About 65 per cent of families receiving the maximum CCB amounts are single parents, of whom 90 per cent are single mothers.

About 65 per cent of families receiving the maximum CCB amounts are single parents, of whom 90 per cent are single mothers.

In the 2020–17 benefit year, over 3.3 million families received more than $23 billion in CCB payments, and the nine out of 10 families who are better off as a result of the CCB received on average almost $2,300 more in benefits, tax-free. The CCB has helped lift about 300,000 children out of poverty, and it is estimated that child poverty will have been reduced by 40 per cent at the end of 2020 from what it was in 2013.

The CCB is a major plank of the Government’s plan to give Canadians the tools, skills and resources they need to be successful. The CCB has helped millions of families pay down debt, save for post-secondary education and buy daily necessities for their kids. This has led to increased consumer confidence and household spending, which is now helping Canada lead the G7 in economic growth, and significantly improving the Government’s fiscal outlook. With this added flexibility, the Government is now able to reinvest directly into the middle class, and those working hard to join it.

In its 2020 Fall Economic Statement, the Government proposed to strengthen the CCB by increasing the benefits annually to keep pace with the rising cost of living as of July 2020. In the fall of 2020, the Government committed to index the CCB to inflation starting July 2020, but a growing economy and improved fiscal track means the Government can deliver on this commitment two years sooner.

Indexing the CCB sooner will ensure that it will continue to play a vital role in supporting Canadian families and reducing child poverty.

Effects of Indexation Beginning in the 2020–19 Benefit Year

CCB amounts and phase-out thresholds ($) Current Benefit Year 2020–19 2020–20 (projected)
Maximum amount per child under 6 6,400 6,496 6,626
Maximum amount per child aged 6 through 17 5,400 5,481 5,591
First income threshold 30,000 30,450 31,059
Second income threshold 65,000 65,975 67,295
Note: Indexation: 1.5% for 2020 and 2.0% (projected) for 2020.
Source: Department of Finance Canada.

As an example of the benefit of this proposed change, for the 2020–20 benefit year, for a single parent with $35,000 of income and two children (one under the age of 6 and one aged 6 to 17), the accelerated indexation of the CCB will contribute $560 towards the costs of raising his or her children.

Indexing the CCB for the 2020–19 benefit year will provide an additional $5.6 billion in support to Canadian families over the 2020–19 to 2022–23 period.

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If you have children under the age of 18, you may be able to get the Canada child benefit (CCB).

In July 2020, the CCB replaced the Canada child tax benefit, the national child benefit supplement, and the universal child care benefit.

Who can get the CCB?

To get the CCB, you or your spouse or common-law partner must be one of the following:

Your child must be under 18 and live with you. And you must be the primarily responsible parent.

You and your spouse or common-law partner, if you have one, also have to file your last year’s income tax.

And you and your spouse or common-law partner must continue to file your income tax returns as long as you get the CCB. You must do this even if you don’t earn any income. If you don’t file your income tax, you won’t get the CCB.

The CCB is paid on the 20 th day of each month. You can get it by mail or by direct deposit into your bank account.

Temporary residents

If you’re a temporary resident who’s lived in Canada for the last 18 months, you may be eligible for the CCB.

To get it, you must have a valid temporary resident permit. But you can’t get the CCB if your temporary resident permit says either of the following things:

  • “Does not confer status”
  • “Does not confer temporary resident status”

If your permit does not say these things, you can apply for the CCB once you’ve been in Canada for a full 18 months.

Children who are in care

You can’t get the CCB for children who are being cared for by a government department, agency, or institution, like a children’s aid society.

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