Child Benefits (Ontario) Канада


Supercharge Your Canada Child Benefit by Making an RRSP Contribution

Posted by Enoch Omololu | Updated on Dec 28, 2020 | Investing Series | 6

**Updated for 2020!

Every New Year, you’re allowed to make contributions to your RRSP during the first 60 days and claim it as a deduction in your income tax return for the previous year. For example, in 2020, you can make RRSP contributions (up until March 1, 2020) using your contribution room from 2020 or previous years, and claim it as a deduction in your income tax return for the 2020 tax year.

This is why the first 2 months of every new year is referred to as the “RRSP Season.” People try to catch up with RRSP contributions they have neglected over the last year because they do not want to miss out on the juicy tax refunds that will come in the mail after they have filed their tax return.

And, of course, they also remember that they need to save for retirement!

For a bit of background, RRSP is an acronym for Registered Retirement Savings Plan. You can contribute up to 18% of your earned income per year, up to a maximum limit – $26,500 for the 2020 tax year ($26,230 for 2020).

RRSP contributions can be claimed as a deduction in your income tax return and will result in a tax refund. The amount of refund you receive is based on your marginal tax rate. Money invested in the RRSP grows tax-deferred until withdrawal in retirement, and unused contribution room can be carried forward to future years.

As if there are not enough reasons to make you want to save for retirement, there is an additional incentive (if you have kids) for why you should consider making that RRSP contribution before March 1!

Canada Child Benefit (CCB)

The Canada Child Benefit was introduced in the Federal Budget of 2020. The program was set up to replace the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB). Like the CCTB (and unlike the UCCB), Canada Child Benefit payments are non-taxable.

Eligibility for CCB payments is based on a family’s combined net income. For 2020, the maximum eligible annual benefits under the CCB are $6,639 per eligible child under age 6 and $5,602 per eligible child between 6 and 17 years. Families that have children with disabilities may receive an additional benefit of $2,832 per child for the disability tax credit.

The maximum benefit is received by a family with an annual net income less than $30,450. For net annual incomes between $30,450 and $65,976 and those above $65,976, there will be a clawback of the CCB based on the number of children as follows:

** Percentage of clawback on net income over $65,976

For example, a family with 2 children under the age of 6 and a family net income of $29,500 would qualify for the maximum annual benefit of $13,278 ($6,639 x 2).

If the same family had a net income of $60,000, there would be a clawback of 13.5% on the excess income over $30,450 i.e. ($60,976 – $30,450) x 13.5% = $4,121. Therefore, the family would receive a total CCB benefit of $9,157 (i.e. $13,278 – $4,121).

RRSP Contributions Are Considered A Deduction

RRSP contributions are treated in a way that highlights the difference between tax credits and tax deductions. While tax credits are calculated at the lowest tax rate (currently 15%), deductions will impact your income at your highest marginal tax rate.

Additionally, because tax deductions lower your net income on line 236 of your tax return, they impact your eligibility for income-tested benefits at both federal and provincial levels.

The main deductions that lower your net income on line 236 include:

  • RRSP contributions
  • Pension adjustments
  • Childcare expenses
  • Professional and Union dues
  • Employment expenses


Are you seeing where I’m going with this?

Because RRSP contributions are considered a tax deduction on your income tax return, they lower your taxable income and can increase the amount of CCB payments you are eligible for!

Canada Child Benefit and RRSP Contribution Scenarios

For the scenarios below, I used the government CCB calculator here.

Scenario 1
Family A with 3 kids all under 6 years of age and a family net income of $75,000. They make no RRSP contributions and can expect a total family CCB payment of $11,750 for the year. They can also expect to pay approximately $15,852 in taxes (Ontario).
Assumptions for scenario 1: no RRSP contribution made and no other pension plan contributions.

Scenario 2
Family B with 3 kids under 6 years of age and a family net income of $75,000. If they decide to contribute $13,500 which is their full RRSP contribution room for the year (i.e. 18% x $75,000), their family net income falls to $61,500. They can expect a family CCB payment of $13,215, and will pay approx. $11,814 in taxes (Ontario).
Assumptions for scenario 2: full RRSP contribution made and no other pension plan contributions.

Outcome
Because Family B made RRSP contributions for the previous year, their CCB payments increased by $1,465 for the year or $122/month. Additionally, they will save $1,401 in taxes and at a marginal tax rate of 29.65%, their RRSP contribution will also result in a tax refund of about $4,000.

The scenarios denoted above are somewhat simplistic. However, they clearly show that when it comes to income-tested benefits (such as CCB, GST/HST credit, etc.), there is extra money to be had if your taxable net income is as low as possible.

Closing Thoughts

Saving for retirement is always a good thing! With RRSP contributions, you lower your taxes, get a refund and grow your retirement pot. The new Canada Child Benefit program is especially beneficial to low- and middle-income families.

When you boost your RRSP contributions and increase the CCB you are eligible for, the extra funds received can also be used to build up a family RESP for your children’s future post-secondary education.

It is important to determine what works best for your family when it comes to making RRSP contributions efficiently. For some individuals just starting out in the workforce and currently in a low tax bracket, it may make more sense to carry forward their RRSP contributions until when they are in a higher tax bracket. For some in a higher tax bracket, contributing to a spousal RRSP as a means of income-splitting in retirement may be the savvy thing to do.

Canada Child Benefits

1 Canada Child Benefits Including related federal, provincial and territorial programs For the period from July 2011 to June 2012 T4114(E) Rev. 11

2 Is this booklet for you? T his booklet explains who is eligible for the Canada Child Tax Benefit and the Universal Child Care Benefit, how you apply for them, when you get them, and how we calculate them for the benefit year July 2011 to June This booklet also provides details about related provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). If you have a visual impairment, you can get our publications in braille, large print, etext (CD), or MP3 by going to /alternate or by calling You can also get your personalized correspondence in these formats by calling This booklet contains proposed changes to law that were current at the time of publication. For any updates to this information, go to /benefits. La version française de cette publication est intitulée Prestations canadiennes pour enfants.

3 What s new? Shared custody Beginning in July 2011, each eligible parent in a shared custody situation will get half of the child benefit and credit payments for that child every month that they qualify. For more information, see Do you share custody of a child? on page 8. Reporting Universal Child Care Benefit payments on your income tax and benefit return For 2010 and later years, if you were a single parent at the end of the year, you can choose who will report the Universal Child Care Benefit payments you received. For more information, see How do you report your UCCB on your income tax and benefit return? on page 17. Lump-sum advance payments If your monthly entitlement is less than $10, we will make one lump-sum payment on July 20, 2011, to cover the entire benefit year from July 2011 to June Under proposed changes, this amount has been increased to $20. For more information, see When do we pay your benefit? on page 13. Marital status changes Under proposed changes, beginning in July 2011, if there is a change to your marital status, we will recalculate your benefit based on your new marital status starting with the month following the month of the change. For more information, see Has your marital status changed? on page 24.

4 Table of Contents Page Definitions. 5 Canada Child Tax Benefit. 6 Are you eligible. 6 Should you apply. 7 Do you share custody of a child. 8 How do you apply. 9 What happens after you apply? How do we calculate your benefit? When do we pay your benefit? When do we recalculate your benefit? What happens if you were overpaid? National Child Benefit Child Disability Benefit Related programs administered by the CRA Universal Child Care Benefit Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit BC Family Bonus New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit Northwest Territories Child Benefit Nova Scotia Child Benefit Nunavut Child Benefit Ontario Child Benefit Yukon Child Benefit Related program not administered by the CRA Child assistance payments When should you contact us? Has the number of children in your care changed? Has your marital status changed? Has a benefit recipient died? Are you moving? Other changes Service standards Tax centre addresses For more information

5 Definitions Adjusted family net income The adjusted family net income is your family net income (defined below) minus any Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) and registered disability savings plan (RDSP) income received plus any UCCB and RDSP amounts repaid. Common-law partner This applies to a person who is not your spouse (defined on the next page), with whom you are living in a conjugal relationship, and to whom at least one of the following situations applies. He or she: a) has been living with you in a conjugal relationship for at least 12 continuous months; b) is the parent of your child by birth or adoption; or c) has custody and control of your child (or had custody and control immediately before the child turned 19 years of age) and your child is wholly dependent on that person for support. In addition, an individual immediately becomes your common-law partner if you previously lived together in a conjugal relationship for at least 12 continuous months and you have resumed living together in such a relationship. Under proposed changes, this condition will no longer exist. The effect of this proposed change is that a person (other than a person described in b) or c) above) will be your common-law partner only after your current relationship with that person has lasted at least 12 continuous months. This proposed change will apply to 2001 and later years. Reference to 12 continuous months in this definition includes any period that you were separated for less than 90 days because of a breakdown in the relationship. Family net income Your family net income is your net income (line 236 of your income tax and benefit return) added to the net income of your spouse or common-law partner, if you have one. Family net income does not include your child s net income. If you or your spouse or common-law partner were non-residents of Canada for part or all of the year, family net income includes your or your spouse s or common-law partner s world income for any part of the year either of you were not residents of Canada. 5

6 Primarily responsible Primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of a child means that you are responsible for such things as supervising the child s daily activities and needs, making sure the child s medical needs are met, and arranging for child care when necessary. If there is a female parent who lives with the child, we usually consider her to be this person. Note You may not be considered primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of a child if the child is legally, physically or financially maintained by a child welfare agency. For more information, follow the Children’s Special Allowances (CSA) link at /cctb and select CSA fact sheet, or call Separated You are separated when you start living separate and apart from your spouse or common-law partner because of a breakdown in the relationship for a period of at least 90 days and you have not reconciled. Note Once you have been separated for 90 days (because of a breakdown in the relationship), the effective day of your separated status is the date you started living separate and apart. Spouse This applies only to a person to whom you are legally married. Canada Child Tax Benefit T he Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help eligible families with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. The CCTB may include the National Child Benefit Supplement and the Child Disability Benefit (see pages 14 and 15). Are you eligible? To get the CCTB, all of the following conditions must be met: 1. You must live with the child, and the child must be under 18 years of age. 2. You must be the person primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child (defined on the previous page). Note If a child does not live with you all the time, see Do you share custody of a child? on page 8. 6


7 3. You must be a resident of Canada for tax purposes. We consider you to be a resident of Canada when you establish sufficient residential ties in Canada. For more information, see Interpretation Bulletin IT-221, Determination of an Individual s Residence Status. 4. You or your spouse or common-law partner (defined on pages 5 and 6) must be: a Canadian citizen; a permanent resident (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act); a protected person (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act); or a temporary resident (as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act) who has lived in Canada throughout the previous 18 months, and who has a valid permit in the 19th month other than one that states does not confer status or does not confer temporary resident status. If this is your situation, do not apply before the 19th month. Note We pay Children s Special Allowances for children under 18 years of age who are being maintained by a government department, agency, or institution. You cannot get the CCTB for a child for any month in which Children s Special Allowances are payable for that child. Should you apply? The person who is primarily responsible (defined on the previous page) for the care and upbringing of the child should apply for the CCTB. For CCTB purposes, when both a male and a female parent live in the same home as the child, the female parent is usually considered to be primarily responsible for the child and should apply. However, if the male parent is primarily responsible, he can apply. He must attach to Form RC66, Canada Child Benefits Application, a signed note from the female parent that states he is primarily responsible for all of the children in the household. You should apply even if: Your child only lives with you part of the time (see Do you share custody of a child? on the next page). Your child is living with you for a temporary period of time, for example over the summer holidays (see the notes below). Your current adjusted family net income is too high. We recalculate your entitlement every July based on your adjusted family net income for the previous year. Notes A temporary change in care must be for more than 14 days and has to include the first day of any month and the last day of the previous month. 7

8 A temporary shared custody situation must be for more than 4 weeks and has to include the first day of any month and the last day of the previous month. When should you apply? You should apply for the CCTB as soon as possible after: your child is born; a child starts to live with you; or you or your spouse or common-law partner meet the eligibility conditions under Are you eligible? on page 6. You should not delay applying. Your application is considered late if it includes a period that started more than 11 months ago. If your application is late, you may not get payments for the entire period requested. If your application is late, in order to get payments, you must attach clear photocopies (including both sides of all pages) of the following documents for the entire period: proof of citizenship status (for example, a Canadian birth certificate) or immigration status in Canada for you and your spouse or common-law partner, if you have one; proof that you resided in Canada, such as a lease agreement, rent receipts, utility bills or bank statements; proof of birth for each child; and proof that you were the person who is primarily responsible (defined on page 6) for the care and upbringing of the child(ren). For more information, see How do you apply? on the next page. Do you share custody of a child? A child may live with two different individuals on a more or less equal basis. For example: the child lives with one parent four days a week and the other parent three days a week; the child lives with one parent one week and the other parent the following week; or any other regular cycle of alternation. In these cases, both individuals may be considered primarily responsible for the child s care and upbringing when the child lives with them. If this is the case, each individual will get 50% of the payment he or she would have received if the child lived with him or her all of the time. 8

9 If you have already notified us of your shared custody situation, you do not have to contact us. The changes to your payments will be automatic and reflected on your July 2011 notices of determination. Your eligibility for child benefits and credits will continue unless we are advised of a change in your situation. If you have just entered into a shared custody situation and you already get the CCTB for your child(ren), send us a letter explaining the shared custody situation and we will recalculate your CCTB payments accordingly. If you have just entered into a shared custody situation and you do not get the CCTB for your child(ren), you have to apply for the CCTB (see How do you apply? below). For more information, follow the Shared custody link at /cctb or call How do you apply? You can apply for the CCTB by using the Apply for child benefits online service on My Account at /myaccount or by sending us a completed Form RC66, Canada Child Benefits Application. If you are the mother of a newborn and you live in a province or a territory that offers the Automated Benefits Application (ABA) service, you may use that service to apply for all your child benefits. For more information see Automated Benefits Application on the next page. You must also complete and attach to your application Schedule RC66SCH, Status in Canada/Statement of Income, if you or your spouse or common-law partner: became a new resident or returned as a resident of Canada in the last two years; became a Canadian citizen in the last 12 months; or are, as defined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, a permanent resident, protected person (refugee), or temporary resident who has lived in Canada for the previous 18 months. If you and your spouse or common-law partner were residents of Canada for any part of 2010 you must both file a 2010 income tax and benefit return before we can calculate your benefit. To continue getting the CCTB, you both have to file your own income tax and benefit returns for every year that you are residents of Canada, even if you have no income to report. If your spouse or common-law partner is a non-resident of Canada during any part of the year, you will have to complete Form CTB9, Canada Child Tax Benefit Statement of Income, for each year or part of a year that he or she is a non-resident of Canada. 9

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10 You need to attach proof of birth for the child to your application if we have not previously paid benefits to anyone for this child and either of the following applies: the child was born outside Canada; or the child was born in Canada and is one year of age or older. Send your completed Form RC66, along with any other required documents, to your tax centre (see page 27). Once we receive your application, we may ask you to provide supporting documents to prove that you are primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child, such as, but not limited to, the following: a signed statement from a nursery or school authority confirming the child’s home address and guardian on record; a signed statement from a person in a position of authority (such as a doctor, lawyer or social worker); a registration form or a receipt from an activity or club the child was enrolled in for the period you indicated; or a court order, decree or separation agreement. You do not have to provide these documents with your application. However, if you choose to do so, we may contact you only if we need more information or when the review is complete. Social insurance number (SIN) You need a SIN to apply for the CCTB. For more information or to get an application for a SIN, visit the Service Canada Web site at or call To find the address of the Service Canada centre nearest you, call If Service Canada will not give you a SIN you can still apply for the CCTB if you meet all of the conditions listed under Are you eligible? on page 6. Attach a note to your Form RC66, Canada Child Benefits Application, explaining why you cannot get a SIN and include a photocopy of one of the following: Visitor record Passport from your country of emigration Temporary resident permit or extension to a temporary resident permit Minister s permit or extension to a Minister s permit Automated Benefits Application The Automated Benefits Application (ABA) service is a quick, easy and secure way to apply for all your child benefits. 10

11 If you are the mother of a newborn and you live in a province or territory that offers the ABA service, all you need to do is: complete and sign your child s birth registration form issued by your province or territory; give your consent to the vital statistics office to share your information with us; and provide your SIN. To determine if your province or territory is offering the ABA service or to get more information, go to /aba. If you choose to use this service to apply for your child benefits, do not re-apply using our online service or Form RC66. Re-applying may result in a delay in getting your payments. Note If you already get CCTB payments for your other children by direct deposit, we will automatically deposit the payments for your new child into the same account. Otherwise, we will send your payments to you by cheque. For more information, see Direct deposit on page 28. What happens after you apply? If your application is not complete, we will ask for the missing information. This will delay the processing of your application. After we process your application, we will send you a CCTB notice. It will tell you how much you will get and what information we used to calculate the amount. To find out how long it will take to process your application, see Service standards on page 26. We may review your situation at a later date to confirm that the information you gave us has not changed. Note Keep your CCTB notice in case you need to refer to it when you contact us. You may also have to provide information from your notice to other federal, provincial or territorial government departments. How do we calculate your benefit? The CCTB consists of a basic benefit (see the next page), a National Child Benefit Supplement (see page 13), and a Child Disability Benefit (see page 13). For the benefit year July 2011 to June 2012, we calculate your benefit based on: the number of qualified children you have and their ages; your province or territory of residence; your adjusted family net income (defined on page 5) for the base year 2010; and your child s eligibility for the disability tax credit. 11

12 To continue getting the CCTB, you and your spouse or common-law partner each have to file separate income tax and benefit returns every year. Base year and benefit year The base year is the year of the income tax and benefit return from which information is taken to calculate the CCTB entitlement for the benefit year. The base year is the calendar year just before the start of the benefit year. The benefit year is the 12-month period during which the CCTB payments are paid. The benefit year runs from July 1 of the year following the base year to June 30 of the next year. For example, CCTB payments calculated based on the 2010 income tax and benefit return will start being issued in July 2011, which is the beginning of the benefit year. For more information, see When do we pay your benefit? on the next page. The following chart illustrates the link between the base year and the benefit year. Base Year (tax return) Benefit Year (payments) 2010 July 2011 June July 2010 June July 2009 June 2010 Example Lucy has just received her July 2011 CCTB payment. The amount was reduced considerably compared to the amount she received in June. There have not been any changes to the number of eligible children she has. Her June and July payments were calculated using two different base years (the 2009 base year and the 2010 base year respectively). Since Lucy s adjusted family net income was higher in 2010 than it was in 2009, her July 2011 payment was lower than her June 2011 payment. Child and family benefits online calculator You can use our online calculator to get an estimate of your child benefits by going to /benefits-calculator. Basic benefit We calculate the basic benefit as follows: $ per month for each child under 18 years of age (if you live in Alberta, see the note on the next page); and an additional $7.91 per month for your third and each additional child. We reduce the basic benefit if your adjusted family net income is more than $41,544. For a family with one child, the reduction is 2% of the amount of adjusted family net income that is more than $41,

13 For families with two or more children, the reduction is 4% of the amount of adjusted family net income that is more than $41,544. Note The Alberta government has chosen to vary the CCTB amounts based on the age of each child. For Alberta residents, the basic monthly benefit is: $ for each child under 7; $ for each child 7 to 11; $ for each child 12 to 15; and $ for each child 16 or 17. National Child Benefit Supplement The National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS) amounts are: $ per month for the first child; $ per month for the second child; and $ per month for each additional child. The NCBS will be reduced as follows: For a family with one child, the reduction is 12.2% of the amount of the adjusted family net income that is more than $24,183. For a family with two children, the reduction is 23% of the amount of the adjusted family net income that is more than $24,183. For families with three or more children, the reduction is 33.3% of the amount of the adjusted family net income that is more than $24,183. Note If you are on social assistance, the NCBS may reduce the amount of your social assistance payments. Many provinces and territories will consider the NCBS you get as income and will adjust your basic social assistance by this amount. Others may adjust their basic social assistance rates by using the maximum NCBS amount. Child Disability Benefit The Child Disability Benefit (CDB), which is based on the adjusted family net income, provides up to a maximum of $ per month for each child eligible for the disability tax credit. The CDB starts being reduced when the adjusted family net income is more than $41,544. For more information, see page 15. When do we pay your benefit? You are entitled to receive the CCTB in the month following the month you become an eligible individual. For more information, see Are you eligible? on page 6. 13

14 We generally pay your benefit on the 20th of each month. However, if your monthly entitlement is less than $10, we will make one lump-sum payment on July 20, 2011, to cover the entire benefit year from July 2011 to June Under proposed changes, the monthly amount has been increased to $20. If your payment has not arrived by the 20th of any month, wait five working days before calling us at When do we recalculate your benefit? We will recalculate your benefit and send you a CCTB notice showing our revised calculation: at the beginning of every benefit year (every July) based on the income tax and benefit returns that you and your spouse or common-law partner filed for the previous year; after any reassessment of either your or your spouse s or common-law partner s income tax and benefit return that affects the calculation of your benefit; when a child for whom you receive the CCTB turns 18 years of age (the last payment you will get will be for the month of your child s birthday); or after you tell us about changes to your situation that could affect your benefit (see When should you contact us? on page 23). What happens if you were overpaid? If a recalculation shows that you were overpaid CCTB, we will send you a notice to tell you of the balance owing. We may keep all or a part of future CCTB payments, income tax refunds, or goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credits until the balance owing is repaid. This may also apply to the other federal, provincial and territorial programs that we administer. National Child Benefit The National Child Benefit (NCB) is a joint initiative of the federal, provincial and territorial governments. This initiative is designed to: help prevent and reduce the depth of child poverty; ensure that families will always be better off as a result of parents working; and reduce overlap and duplication of government programs and services. 14

15 The National Child Benefit Supplement (NCBS) is included in the CCTB and paid monthly to low-income families with children under 18 years of age. The NCBS is the Government of Canada s contribution to the NCB. As part of the NCB, certain provinces and territories also provide complementary benefits and services for children in low-income families, such as child benefits, earned income supplements, and supplementary health benefits, as well as child care, children-at-risk, and early childhood services. For more information, visit the NCB Web site at Child Disability Benefit The Child Disability Benefit (CDB) is a monthly benefit included in the CCTB to provide financial assistance to qualified families caring for children who have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions. Families with children under 18 years of age who qualify for the disability tax credit (DTC) are eligible to receive a CDB. A child qualifies for the DTC when we have approved Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for that child. For more information on the DTC, go to /disability. For more information on the CDB, go to /benefits or call Note If you have already applied for the CCTB for a child who is eligible for the DTC, the CDB will be calculated automatically for the current and the two previous CCTB benefit years. Beyond these benefit years, you have to send a written request to your tax centre. Related programs administered by the CRA T he CRA administers the Universal Child Care Benefit and the following provincial and territorial child benefit and credit programs: Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit BC Family Bonus New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit Northwest Territories Child Benefit Nova Scotia Child Benefit Nunavut Child Benefit Ontario Child Benefit Yukon Child Benefit 15

16 You do not need to apply separately for these benefits. We use the information from your Canada Child Benefits application to determine your eligibility for these programs. If you are eligible, the amount of your payments will be calculated based on information from the income tax and benefit returns that you and your spouse or common-law partner file. If you share the custody of a child, you will get 50% of the provincial or territorial payment that you would have received if the child lived with you all of the time. If you use our direct deposit service for your CCTB payments, we will deposit your provincial and territorial payments into the same account. Note The earned income and working income used to calculate certain provincial and territorial benefits includes income from employment, self-employment, training allowances, scholarships (if taxable), research grants, and disability payments received under the Canada Pension Plan and the Quebec Pension Plan. Universal Child Care Benefit The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is a taxable benefit paid monthly to help eligible families provide child care for their children under six years of age. The UCCB provides families with a $100 monthly payment (up to $1,200 annually) for each qualified child. You do not have to file an income tax and benefit return to receive the UCCB. Are you eligible? If you are eligible for the CCTB for a child under six years of age, you are also eligible for the UCCB for that child. For more information, see Are you eligible? on page 6. Do you need to apply? You do not need to apply for the UCCB if either of the following situations applies to you. The benefit will be sent to you automatically if: you already receive the CCTB for your children under six years of age; or you are eligible for the CCTB for your children under six years of age and have applied for it, but you do not get it (perhaps because your family income is too high). 16

17 If neither one of these situations applies to you, you will need to apply by using the Apply for child benefits online service on My Account at /myaccount or by sending us a completed Form RC66, Canada Child Benefits Application, as soon as possible after: your child is born; a child under six years of age starts to live with you; or you or your spouse or common-law partner has a child under six years of age, and one of you becomes eligible. When do we pay your benefit? We generally pay your benefit on the 20th of each month. The UCCB is paid separately from the CCTB. If your payment has not arrived by the 20th of any month, wait 10 working days before calling us at How do you report your UCCB on your income tax and benefit return? The UCCB is taxable and must be reported as income if you have to file an income tax and benefit return. Every year, we will send you a RC62, Statement of Universal Child Care Benefit, information slip in February. If you had a spouse or common-law partner on December 31 of a year, whichever one of you had the lower net income must report the UCCB for that year. Enter on line 117 the amount shown in box 10 of the RC62 slip. If you were a single parent on December 31 of a year, you can choose one of the following options: Include all UCCB amounts you received in that year in the income of the dependant that you are claiming as an eligible dependant (line 305 of Schedule 1). If there is no claim for an eligible dependant, you can choose to include all UCCB amounts in the income of a child for whom you received the UCCB. If you choose this option, enter on line 185, located below and to the left of line 117, the amount shown in box 10 of the RC62 slip. Do not enter the amount on line 117. Report all UCCB amounts you received in that year in your own income. If you choose this option, enter on line 117 the amount shown in box 10 of the RC62 slip. Do not enter the amount on line 185. If you have a UCCB repayment, this amount will be included on the RC62 slip. For more information, see lines 117 and 213 in the General Income Tax and Benefit Guide. Income tax cannot be withheld from UCCB payments. You may wish to increase the amount of tax withheld from your other sources of income to take into account this additional income. 17

18 Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit This credit is a non-taxable amount paid to families with working income that have children under 18 years of age. You may be entitled to receive: $702 ($58.50 per month) for the first child; $639 ($53.25 per month) for the second child; $383 ($31.91 per month) for the third child; and $128 ($10.66 per month) for the fourth child. The maximum you can get is the lesser of $1,852 and 8% of your family s working income that is more than $2,760. The credit is reduced by 4% of the amount of the adjusted family net income that is more than $34,280. Payments are made separately from CCTB in July 2011 and January This program is fully funded by the Province of Alberta. For more information, call BC Family Bonus This program includes the basic family bonus and the BC Earned Income Benefit. It provides non-taxable amounts paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Basic Family Bonus The basic family bonus is calculated based on the number of children you have and your adjusted family net income. 18

19 BC Earned Income Benefit Families whose working income is more than $10,000 and whose adjusted family net income is $21,480 or less, may also be entitled to the following: $5.91 per month for the first child; $5.00 per month for the second child; and $10.00 per month for each additional child. Families whose working income is between $3,750 and $10,000 or whose adjusted family net income is more than $21,480 may get part of the earned income benefit. Use our child and family benefits calculator at /benefits-calculator to determine the amount of your benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of British Columbia. New Brunswick Child Tax Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under 18 years of age. The New Brunswick Working Income Supplement (NBWIS) is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with earned income who have children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a basic benefit of $20.83 per month for each child. The amount of the basic benefit is reduced if your adjusted family net income is more than $20,000. The NBWIS is an additional benefit of up to $20.83 per month for each family. It is phased in once family earned income is more than $3,750. The maximum benefit is reached when family earned income is $10,000. If your adjusted family net income is between $20,921 and $25,921, you may get part of the supplement. This program is fully funded by the Province of New Brunswick. 19

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20 Newfoundland and Labrador Child Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low-income families with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. The Mother Baby Nutrition Supplement (MBNS) is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families who have children under one year of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a benefit of: $28.66 per month for the first child; $30.41 per month for the second child; $32.66 per month for the third child; and $35.00 per month for each additional child. If your adjusted family net income is above $17,397, you may get part of the benefit. Under the MBNS, you may be entitled to a benefit of $60 per month for each child under one year of age depending on your adjusted family net income. This program is fully funded by the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Northwest Territories Child Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under 18 years of age. The Territorial Worker s Supplement, part of this program is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with working income who have children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a basic benefit of $27.50 per month for each child. Families who have earned income of more than $3,750 may also get the Territorial Worker s Supplement of up to: $22.91 per month for one child; and $29.16 per month for two or more children. 20

21 If your adjusted family net income is above $20,921, you may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Northwest Territories. Nova Scotia Child Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a benefit of: $45.24 per month for the first child; $65.57 per month for the second child; and $73.20 per month for each additional child. If your adjusted family net income is between $18,000 and $23,000, you may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of Nova Scotia. Nunavut Child Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to qualifying families with children under 18 years of age. The Territorial Worker s Supplement part of this program is an additional benefit paid to qualifying families with working income who have children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a basic benefit of $27.50 per month for each child. Families who have earned income of more than $3,750 may also get the Territorial Worker s Supplement of up to: $22.91 per month for one child; and $29.16 per month for two or more children. If your adjusted family net income is above $20,921, you may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by Nunavut. 21

22 Ontario Child Benefit The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) is a non-taxable amount paid to help low- to moderate-income families provide for their children. OCB payments are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. Under the OCB, you may be eligible to receive up to $91.66 per month for each child under 18 years of age. If your adjusted family net income is above $20,000, you may get part of the benefit. This program is fully funded by the Province of Ontario. For more information, go to the Ministry of Children and Youth Services Web site at or call For teletypewriter service (TTY), call For specific payment information, call or for TTY, call Ontario Child Care Supplement for Working Families If you live in Ontario, we will automatically send the information needed for the Ontario Child Care Supplement (OCCS) for Working Families to the Ontario Ministry of Revenue. The Ministry will send out applications to qualifying families, which they must complete and return. The OCCS, which is being phased out, is integrated into the OCB. OCCS payments are reduced dollar-for-dollar by the amount of a family s OCB payments. Families with children born after June 30, 2009, will not be eligible for OCCS payments. Families who have children born before July 1, 2009, and whose OCCS entitlement exceeds their OCB payment will continue to receive the difference through OCCS payments. For more information, visit the Ontario Ministry of Revenue Web site at Yukon Child Benefit This benefit is a non-taxable amount paid monthly to help low- and modest-income families with the cost of raising children under 18 years of age. Benefits are combined with the CCTB into a single monthly payment. You may be entitled to a benefit of $57.50 per month for each child. If your adjusted family net income is above $30,000, you may get part of the benefit. This program is funded by the Yukon with a contribution from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada on behalf of Indian children. 22

23 Related program not administered by the CRA Child assistance payments If you live in Quebec, you must file your application for child assistance payments and make any changes to your family situation directly with the Régie des rentes du Québec. However, you do not have to file an application for a child born in Quebec because the Régie is automatically notified by the Registrar of Civil Status. For more information, visit the Régie Web site at When should you contact us? Y ou should tell us immediately about certain changes, as well as the date they happened or will happen. In this section we identify those changes and how you should tell us about them. Our service standards are outlined on page 26. Note For confidentiality reasons, we can only discuss a file with a benefit recipient, unless they give us permission to speak to someone else. To give someone else permission, you can use the Authorize my representative online service on My Account at /myaccount or send us a completed Form T1013, Authorizing or Cancelling a Representative. Has the number of children in your care changed? When your child is born or when a child starts to live with you, you will need to apply to get the CCTB for that child. For more information, see How do you apply? on page 9. If a child for whom you were getting benefits is no longer in your care, no longer lives with you on a full-time basis, stops living with you, or has died, call or send a letter to your tax centre (see page 27). 23

24 Has your marital status changed? If your marital status changes, be sure to let us know as soon as possible, as this may affect the amount of CCTB to which you are entitled. We define common-law partner, separated, and spouse on pages 5 and 6. To change your marital status, use our online service, My Account, at /myaccount, send us a completed Form RC65, Marital Status Change, or notify us in a letter of your new marital status and the date of the change. If you are now married or living common-law, also include your spouse s or common-law partner s name, address, and social insurance number. You and your spouse or common-law partner must both sign the form or letter. Notes If you have become separated Do not tell us of your separation until you have been separated for more than 90 consecutive days. If you have a new spouse or common-law partner All the children will be moved to the female parent’s account. However, if the male parent is primarily responsible, see Should you apply? on page 7. If your spouse or common-law partner is a person of the same sex, one of you will get the CCTB for all the children. Only one CCTB payment is allowed per family each month. If both you and your new spouse or common-law partner were getting separate payments, only one payment will be made based on your new adjusted family net income. If you continue to get separate payments, one of you will have to repay the amounts you got after your marital status changed. Send the form or letter to your tax centre (see page 27). When we get notification of your change in marital status, we will recalculate your CCTB taking into consideration your new marital status and your new adjusted family net income. Under proposed changes, beginning in July 2011, your CCTB will be adjusted starting with the month following the month that your marital status changed. Example 1 Lucy was single and received the CCTB for her two children based on her income only. In September 2011, Lucy married Peter. Peter s net income in 2010 was $100,000. Lucy notified us of her new marital status by using My Account. We will base the CCTB payments on Lucy s new adjusted net income and her CCTB payments will change starting with the October 2011 payment. 24

25 Example 2 After 10 years of marriage, Mary and Mark separated on October 5, In January 2012, after Mary had been separated for 90 consecutive days, she notified us of her separation by submitting Form RC65. Mark s income was very high in We will base her CCTB payments on her income alone from November until the end of the current benefit year (June 2012), and Mary will get higher CCTB payments. Has a benefit recipient died? If a benefit recipient has died, the next of kin or the estate should inform us as soon as possible. Someone else may be eligible to receive the benefits for the child. Call , or send a letter to your tax centre (see page 27). Are you moving? If you move, be sure to let us know immediately. Otherwise, your payments may stop, whether you get them by cheque or direct deposit. To change your address, you can use our online service, My Account, at /myaccount, call , or send a letter to your tax centre (see page 27). If you are writing, make sure to sign your letter and include your social insurance number, your new address, and the date of your move. Other changes Call to tell us: if your or your spouse s or common-law partner s immigration or residency status changes; or if any of the personal information, such as your name, marital status, or the spousal or child information shown on your CCTB notice or your UCCB notice, is not correct. 25

26 Service standards T he Canada Revenue Agency is committed to providing you with service that is fair, accurate, timely, courteous, and confidential. Our service standards apply to processing applications and marital status change forms, responding to correspondence, reviewing programs, and responding to telephone enquiries. Benefit applications and marital status changes Timeliness Our goal is to issue a payment, notice, or explanation to you within 80 calendar days. Accuracy Our goal is to accurately process the appropriate payment and notice, and if necessary, a letter requesting additional information. Correspondence Timeliness Our goal is to respond to written enquiries and telephone referrals from the call centres within 80 calendar days. Accuracy Our goal is to respond to written enquiries and telephone referrals from the call centres with the correct information and process new recipient information, including issuing a payment, notice, or letter, accurately. Review Timeliness Our goal is to inform you of the result of our review within 45 days after we receive the information requested. Telephone enquiries Our courteous and knowledgeable agents will be pleased to respond to your questions in the official language of your choice. Our goal is to respond to telephone enquiries within two minutes. You may have difficulty reaching us during peak periods. 26


27 I Tax centre addresses f you need to send us a letter or a form, you should send it to the tax centre that serves your area. Use the chart below to identify your tax centre: If your tax services office is located in: British Columbia, Regina, or Yukon Alberta, London, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Saskatoon, Thunder Bay, or Windsor Barrie, Sudbury (the area of Sudbury/Nickel Belt only), Toronto Centre, Toronto East, Toronto North, or Toronto West Laval, Montréal, Nunavut, Ottawa, Rouyn-Noranda, Sherbrooke, or Sudbury (other than the Sudbury/Nickel Belt area) Chicoutimi, Montérégie-Rive-Sud, Outaouais, Québec, Rimouski, or Trois-Rivières Kingston, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Peterborough, or St. Catharines Belleville, Hamilton, Kitchener/Waterloo, or Prince Edward Island Send your correspondence to the following address: Surrey Tax Centre 9755 King George Boulevard Surrey BC V3T 5E1 Winnipeg Tax Centre PO Box 14005, Station Main Winnipeg MB R3C 0E3 Sudbury Tax Centre PO Box 20000, Station A Sudbury ON P3A 5C1 Shawinigan-Sud Tax Centre PO Box 3000, Station Main Shawinigan-sud QC G9N 7S6 Jonquière Tax Centre PO 1900, Station LCD Jonquière QC G7S 5J1 St. John s Tax Centre PO Box 12071, Station A St. John’s NL A1B 3Z1 Summerside Tax Centre Pope Road Summerside PE C1N 5Z7 27

28 For more information What if you need help? If you need help after reading this publication, go to /benefits or call Forms and publications To get our forms or publications, go to /forms or call My Account My Account is a secure, convenient, and time-saving way to access and manage your tax and benefit information online, seven days a week. If you are not registered with My Account but need information right away, use Quick Access to get fast, easy, and secure access to some of your information. For more information, go to /myaccount or see Pamphlet RC4059, My Account for individuals. My Payment My Payment is a payment option that allows individuals and businesses to make payments online, using the Canada Revenue Agency s Web site, from an account at a participating Canadian financial institution. For more information on this self-service option, go to /mypayment. Direct deposit Join the millions that are already enjoying the benefits of direct deposit security, convenience, and reliability. You can have your payments deposited directly into your account at a financial institution in Canada. To get this service or change your banking information, use My Account at /myaccount, or send us a completed Form T1-DD(1), Direct Deposit Request Individuals. Note Your direct deposit request will stay in effect until you change the information or cancel the service. If we cannot deposit a payment into your account, we will mail a cheque to you at the address we have on file. Tax Information Phone Service (TIPS) For personal and general tax information by telephone, use our automated service, TIPS, by calling

29 Teletypewriter (TTY) users TTY users can call for bilingual assistance during regular business hours. Our service complaint process If you are not satisfied with the service that you have received, please contact the CRA employee with whom you have been dealing (or call the telephone number that you have been given). If you are not pleased with the way your concerns are addressed, you can ask to discuss the matter with the employee s supervisor. If the matter is not settled, you can then file a service complaint by completing Form RC193, Service-Related Complaint. If you are still not satisfied, you can file a complaint with the taxpayers ombudsman. For more information, go to /complaints or see Booklet RC4420, Information on CRA Service Complaints. Your opinion counts If you have any comments or suggestions that could help us improve our publications, we would like to hear from you. Please send your comments to: Taxpayer Services Directorate Canada Revenue Agency 750 Heron Road Ottawa ON K1A 0L5 29

Пособия и льготы на ребёнка и семью в Канаде

7 февраля 2020, 04:31

Пособия и льготы на ребёнка и семью в Канаде включают:

  • Canada child benefit;
  • Goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit;
  • Смежные провинциальные и территориальные программы;
  • Налоговый вычет работающим родителям;
  • Другие федеральные программы.

Цель этих пособий – оказать материальную помощь лицам и семьям. Выплатами руководит Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Вы имеете право на пособие и хотите подать заявку? Выберите ссылку ниже, чтобы получить больше информации о пособии, кредите или программе.

Узнайте, имеете ли вы право на пособие или кредит
Женаты или в гражданском браке, есть дети младше 18 лет Одиноки, есть дети младше 18 лет Женаты или в гражданском браке, нет детей Single and 19 or older with no children
Пособие Canada child benefit Да Да Нет No
Кредит Goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit Да Да Да Yes
Пособия по провинциальным и территориальным программам Да Да Да Yes

Canada child benefit

Canada child benefit (CCB) – это ежемесячное безналоговое пособие для семей, которое помогает им с затратами на содержание детей младше 18 лет. В CCB может входить пособие на детей-инвалидов и другие смежные провинциальные и территориальные программы. Canada Revenue Agency использует информацию о вашем подоходном налоге и вычете по пособиям, чтобы рассчитать, сколько составит ваше пособие CCB. Чтобы получить CCB, вам нужно подавать налоговые декларации каждый год, даже если у вас не было прибыли в том или ином году. Если у вас есть супруг или партнёр по общему праву, то они также должны ежегодно декларировать свои доходы. Пособие выплачивают в течение 12 месяцев, с июля одного года до июня следующего. Размер пособия будет пересчитываться в июле каждого года на основании информации о вашем подоходном налоге и возмещении с пособий за предыдущий год.

Кредит Goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) credit

Кредит GST/HST – это безналоговые ежеквартальные выплаты, которые помогают лицам и семьям с низким доходом компенсировать часть или весь налог GST или HST, который они платят. Больше не нужно подавать заявку на получение кредита GST/HST. Canada Revenue Agency автоматически закрепит за вами право на него, когда вы декларируете ваши доходы и пособия с 2014 налогового года и позже. Если вы новый житель Канады и хотите подать заявку на кредит GST/HST, то заполните Form RC151, GST/HST Credit Application for Indiv >Пособие на ребёнка-инвалида Это безналоговое пособие для семей, которые ухаживают за несовершеннолетним ребёнком с правом на налоговую льготу по инвалидности. Налоговый вычет работающим родителям Это налоговая льгота для работающих лиц и семей с низким доходом, которые уже находятся в составе рабочей силы. Цель этого налога – это также стимулировать канадцев выйти на рынок труда. Специальные пособия на детей Эта программа предусматривает выплаты федеральным и территориальным органам и учреждениям, которые заботятся о детях (например, обществам помощи детям). Ждёте ребёнка? Если вы биологическая мать новорождённого, то можете использовать Automated Benefits Application на форме регистрации рождения, когда вы регистрируете вашего новорождённого ребёнка в вашей провинции. Это позволит вам подать заявки на получение помощи для вашего ребёнка по Canada child benefit, GST/HST credit и подобным провинциальным и территориальным программам. Как получить пособие на ребёнка за предыдущие годы? Если вы соответствуете требованиям и воспитываете ребёнка возрастом до 18 лет по состоянию на июль 2020 года, то вы всё ещё можете подать заявку на получение таких пособий:

Последние регулярные платежи по этим пособиям за предыдущие годы были выданы в июне 2020 года. Что делать после подачи заявки? Вам не нужно подавать заявку на эти пособия и кредиты каждый год. Но вы ежегодно должны:

  • Декларировать ваш доход и налоговый вычет
    • Чтобы получать пособия и кредиты, на которые вы имеете право, вам нужно каждый год вовремя декларировать ваш доход и налоговый вычет, даже если у вас не было прибыли в течение определённого года. Если у вас есть супруг или партнёр по общему праву, ему тоже нужно подавать такие декларации.
  • Обновлять ваши личные данные
    • Чтобы убедиться, что вы получаете правильную сумму пособия или кредита, вам нужно обновлять ваши личные данные в CRA.
  • Иметь подтверждающие документы
    • Возможно, в будущем вы получите письмо от CRA с просьбой подтвердить ваши личные данные в качестве части процесса проверки.


Как узнать, сколько составит пособие? Чтобы узнать сумму пособия или кредита, воспользуйтесь специальным калькулятором пособий на ребёнка и семью от CRA.

Child Benefits (Ontario) Канада

Сообщение alexxis » 12 сен 2010, 04:06

pluto писал(а): Вы должны указать весь ваш доход за прошлый год, разделив его до Канады и после..
Вот вам сайт http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/menu-eng.html
Там выберите провинцию в которой вы проживаете..
Вот ссылка про Онтарио.
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/E/pub/tg/5000-g/5000g-09e.pdf

там вроде бы всё подробно описано.
если чего то не ясно тогда почитаем вместе..

Конечно если вы имели большой доход, то пособие на детей будет маленькое..насколько маленькое это опять же зависит от вашего дохода.

Спасибо за предложение прочитать вместе:)

После углубленного изучения пришел к следующим выводам:

1.General Income Tax Guide не содержит информации по поводу того, что делать с доходом до переезда в Канаду.
2. Однако в нем есть ссылка на Pamphlet T4055, в котором говорится, что под доходом имеется ввиду тот World Income, который имел место для той части года, когда заявитель являлся резидентом Канады, т.е. после лендинга. Соответствеено, в Делкарации (T1 General) доход до Канады не должен упоминаться.
3. Эта декларация (в которой должен упоминаться только доход за последние месяцы года после переезда в Канаду — если он будет, конечно) должна подаваться до апреля 2011.
4. Однако сразу по приезду можно послать Application for Child Benefit (RC66). Согласно этому документу, если заявитель стал резидентом Канады в течение последних двух лет, к нему надо приложить форму RC66SCH (Status in Canada / Statement of Income). Вот как раз в этой форме надо будет написать свой доход до Канады за год приезда (2010) и еще за два года назад (2009, 2008).
5. Насколько я понял, цифры доходов в RC66SCH никак не влияют на количества налога для опаты за 2010 (в апреле 2011). И вообще, ни на что они не влияют, кроме как на вычисление размера детского пособия. Которое, конечно же, потом будет пересчитано на основе канадского дохода за 2011, но это будет уже через полтора года.
6. Форма RC66SCH никакими подтверждающими документами не сопровождается, т.е. размер дохоов за предыдущие два года проверяться не будет, в надежде на честность заявителя.
7. Как это ни плачевно, начинать жизнь в Канаде с обмана не хочется, так что напишу что было, осознавая, что детское пособие будет или ноль или минимум, если такой имеет место быть.
8. Какой бы ни был мой доход в 2010 до Канады, платить налог за него в Канаде я не буду.

Канада Child Tax Benefit — Canada Child Tax Benefit

Канада Child Tax Benefit (ССТВ) был налог -бесплатно ежемесячный платеж имеющим на это право канадских семей , чтобы помочь с расходами на воспитание детей . ССТВ может включать Национальную пособие на ребенка (НЦБ), ежемесячное пособие для малообеспеченных семей с детьми, а также ребенка пособие по инвалидности (CDB), ежемесячное пособие для семей , осуществляющих уход за детьми с тяжелыми и длительными психическими или физическими недостатками .

ССТВА было принято в ответ на обязательство , принятое канадским парламент в ноябре 1989 года, чтобы искоренить детскую бедность в Канаде в 2000 году , однако, было установлено , что из — за сокращения в социальную помощь , влияние этой программы в снижении детской бедности ничтожна.

Эта программа была ликвидирована в 2020 году и заменен Canada Child Benefit (БКК), в безналоговой платеж в размере $ 533,00 за ребенка в возрасте до 6 и $ 450 за ребенка в возрасте от 6 до 17. Что уменьшается при различных скоростях по числу детей и количеству денег домохозяйство делает так , что домашние хозяйства в верхней части «среднего класса» и « с высоким уровнем дохода» не получают ничего.

CHILD TAX BENEFIT IN CANADA

CHILD TAX BENEFIT IN CANADA

Canadians frequently call their social security system as the “national security system”. This program was designed to help all social strata (especially minors, elderly and the unemployed people). In Canada, benefits were introduced in January 1993. They are paid to families with low or middle income, with one or more minor children. The benefit amount depends on the family’s annual income.

National Child Benefit program combines two elements: the federal monthly allowance for each child from a family with low income, as well as additional provincial benefits and payments. Such benefits may include medical insurance, free public transport, budgetary subsidy or provision of work in Canada. Families, whose annual income is less than twenty thousand dollars, are eligible to apply for the state assistance. The assistance amount depend on the number of children in the family. Larger families have the opportunity to get indexed financial assistance, even if the income is over twenty thousand dollars.


Ontario Ensuring Vulnerable Families Keep Full Canada Child Benefit

Archived News Release

Ontario Ensuring Vulnerable Families Keep Full Canada Child Benefit

Province Helping to Fight Child Poverty

As part of its commitment to combat child poverty, Ontario will ensure that families receiving social assistance fully benefit from the proposed new federal Canada Child Benefit (CCB), without any provincial ‘clawback’.

As a result, almost 260,000 children in families who receive social assistance will benefit from the full amount of their CCB payment.

The CCB is expected to take effect July 1, 2020. Ontario has taken the necessary steps to ensure that the full amount of the CCB benefit will be paid directly to families and will not affect the amount of, or eligibility for:

  • Ontario Works benefits
  • Ontario Disability Support Program benefits
  • Child care subsidies under the Child Care and Early Years Act
  • Healthy Smiles Ontario, the province’s dental program for low-income youth
  • Rent-geared-to-income subsidies
  • Portable housing benefits.

The provincial changes, which include regulatory changes, have already been made so that they will apply to the very first CCB payment to families. The maximum annual benefit will be $6,400 per child under the age of six and $5,400 per child aged six to 17. The vast majority of families receiving social assistance in Ontario will receive these maximum amounts.

Combatting child poverty is part of the government’s economic plan to build Ontario up and deliver on its number-one priority to grow the economy and create jobs. The four-part plan includes investing in talent and skills, including helping more people get and create the jobs of the future by expanding access to high-quality college and university education. The plan is making the largest investment in public infrastructure in Ontario’s history and investing in a low-carbon economy driven by innovative, high-growth, export-oriented businesses. The plan is also helping working Ontarians achieve a more secure retirement.

Quick Facts

  • The proposed Canada Child Benefit would replace the Canada Child Tax Benefit, including the National Child Benefit Supplement, and the Universal Child Care Benefit.

Additional Resources

Quotes

“I am proud that Ontario has taken action to make these important changes, and that we are working with the federal government to fight child poverty. Putting the full amount of the Canada Child Benefit in the hands of families instead of clawing it back to subsidize existing provincial programs is a crucial way to help the most vulnerable children and families in our province.”

Dr. Helena Jaczek

Minister of Community and Social Services


“Ontario’s decisive action to prevent clawbacks on the new Canada Child Benefit will ensure that the most vulnerable families in our province receive a much needed income security boost. This is a great example of how different levels of government can work together to fight poverty and drive tangible results that will be good for our communities.”

Vice President, Communications & Public Affairs, United Way Toronto & York Region

Backgrounder: Strengthening the Canada Child Benefit

The Government’s plan to strengthen the middle class and grow the economy is working. Since November 2015, the Canadian economy has created nearly 600,000 jobs and the unemployment rate is near its lowest point in 40 years.

Canada has had the fastest-growing economy among Group of Seven (G7) countries. Canadians are feeling more optimistic about their future and the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) is a key part of this. The International Monetary Fund has specifically cited the CCB as having contributed to the revitalization of the Canadian economy following a downturn in 2015.

Through Budget 2020, the Government is taking the next step to help grow the economy in a way that strengthens the middle class—starting with those working hard to join it.

Building on a Stronger Canada Child Benefit

Introduced in 2020, the CCB is a key initiative of the Government to strengthen the middle class and help those working hard to join it by putting more money in the pockets of those who need it most. Through the CCB, nine out of 10 families now receive more than they did under the previous benefit system.

Whether the extra money is used for things such as after-school care, tutoring or a new pair of winter boots, the CCB helps parents with the high costs of raising their kids.

The CCB Provides Greater Support for Single Mothers

Myriam is a single mother of two children aged 5 and 8. Her net income was $35,000 in 2020. Myriam’s family will have received $11,125 in tax-free CCB payments in the 2020–18 benefit year, $3,535 more than she would have received under the old system of child benefits.

Last year, single mothers earning less than $60,000 a year received about $9,000 in tax-free benefit payments on average to help make things like healthy food, summer programs and winter clothes more affordable.

New in Budget 2020

The Government is taking action to help ensure that everyone who qualifies for support receives it. The Government recognizes that Indigenous communities—and in particular remote and northern Indigenous communities—face distinct barriers to accessing federal benefits such as the CCB. To close this gap, the Government will expand outreach efforts to all on-reserve, remote and northern Indigenous communities, and pilot outreach activities for urban Indigenous communities—so that Indigenous Peoples are better able to access the full range of federal programs, including the CCB.

  • simple—families receive a single payment every month
  • tax-free—families do not have to pay back part of the amount received when they file their tax returns
  • targeted to those who need it most—low- and middle-income families get higher payments, and those with the highest incomes receive less than under the previous system of child benefits
  • generous—on average, families benefitting from the CCB receive about $6,800 in CCB payments annually.

The CCB provides greater support to those who need it most: low- and middle-income families. About 65 per cent of families receiving the maximum CCB amounts are single parents, of whom 90 per cent are single mothers.

About 65 per cent of families receiving the maximum CCB amounts are single parents, of whom 90 per cent are single mothers.

In the 2020–17 benefit year, over 3.3 million families received more than $23 billion in CCB payments, and the nine out of 10 families who are better off as a result of the CCB received on average almost $2,300 more in benefits, tax-free. The CCB has helped lift about 300,000 children out of poverty, and it is estimated that child poverty will have been reduced by 40 per cent at the end of 2020 from what it was in 2013.

The CCB is a major plank of the Government’s plan to give Canadians the tools, skills and resources they need to be successful. The CCB has helped millions of families pay down debt, save for post-secondary education and buy daily necessities for their kids. This has led to increased consumer confidence and household spending, which is now helping Canada lead the G7 in economic growth, and significantly improving the Government’s fiscal outlook. With this added flexibility, the Government is now able to reinvest directly into the middle class, and those working hard to join it.


In its 2020 Fall Economic Statement, the Government proposed to strengthen the CCB by increasing the benefits annually to keep pace with the rising cost of living as of July 2020. In the fall of 2020, the Government committed to index the CCB to inflation starting July 2020, but a growing economy and improved fiscal track means the Government can deliver on this commitment two years sooner.

Indexing the CCB sooner will ensure that it will continue to play a vital role in supporting Canadian families and reducing child poverty.

Effects of Indexation Beginning in the 2020–19 Benefit Year

CCB amounts and phase-out thresholds ($) Current Benefit Year 2020–19 2020–20 (projected)
Maximum amount per child under 6 6,400 6,496 6,626
Maximum amount per child aged 6 through 17 5,400 5,481 5,591
First income threshold 30,000 30,450 31,059
Second income threshold 65,000 65,975 67,295
Note: Indexation: 1.5% for 2020 and 2.0% (projected) for 2020.
Source: Department of Finance Canada.

As an example of the benefit of this proposed change, for the 2020–20 benefit year, for a single parent with $35,000 of income and two children (one under the age of 6 and one aged 6 to 17), the accelerated indexation of the CCB will contribute $560 towards the costs of raising his or her children.

Indexing the CCB for the 2020–19 benefit year will provide an additional $5.6 billion in support to Canadian families over the 2020–19 to 2022–23 period.

New Canada Child Benefit program payments start today

Social Sharing

Tax-free payments will be higher for lower-income families

Starting today, most Canadian families with children under 18 can expect to see a bigger child benefit payment, as money starts flowing in one of the most ambitious social policies to be implemented in Canada in decades.

The new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) is expected to push tens of thousands of Canadian children above the poverty line, and could help stimulate an economy that could use a jolt in the arm.

«This is an initiative that’s going to help Canadian families in a significant measure,» Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told the CBC’s Rosemary Barton in an interview Wednesday, and noted it is a «more generous and tax free» system than its predecessor, he said later at a press conference.

But it’s pricey: the benefit is expected to cost $22.4 billion over five years. It also won’t be indexed to inflation until 2020.

Still, the vast majority of Canadian families will see a boost to their bottom line.

«At the end of the day, based on the models we have looked at and based on what the government has said, about 90 per cent of families that have kids under the age of 18 will actually have more money than they did under the old system,» says Jamie Golombek, managing director of tax and estate planning for CIBC Wealth Strategies Group.

Take from the rich, give to the poor

The poorest of those families will see the biggest boost while the wealthiest will see their child benefit payment disappear altogether.

Under the old system, families could receive both the Canada Child Tax Benefit (CCTB) and the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB). The CCTB was tied to income but the UCCB was, as its name implies, universal.

The UCCB provided $160 per child per month for children under six and $60 per month for children aged six to 17. That money was paid out to families regardless of income level.

The new program combines the CCTB and UCCB into one payment that is entirely income tested. The new payment is also tax-free.

Under the new CCB, families with children under the age of six will receive as much as $6,400 per child per year. Families with kids between six and 17 will receive a maximum of $5,400 annually under the new plan.


Families with net income below $30,000 per year will receive the maximum and families earning more than $200,000 per year will see their payments eliminated.

The extra money and the fact that it’s tax-free could have a stimulative effect on the economy, at least initially.

«It’s theirs to spend,» said Stephen Poloz, governor of the Bank of Canada, earlier this week at a news conference in Ottawa.

«Of course when they spend it, it has secondary effects.»

Feeling more ‘human’

Ava Williams is a Toronto social worker with a net income of about $30,000, who lives in community housing. As a single mother of four children between the ages of six and 17, she says the new program will boost her annual federal benefit payment by about $6,000 per year, which doesn’t include the added benefit of the new payment being tax free.

«It will make us feel a little bit more human,» says Williams.

«I know for myself, I feel a little bit dehumanized . Because there’s this whole stigma that you’re lazy, you just want the money, but it has nothing to do with that. I work a full-time job, 40 hours a week and I still live in poverty.»

Williams says the extra money will mean she’ll be able to afford more things for her kids in school, such as the snack program and school trips.

«For me, I know it’s going to help me buy better groceries, maybe even move to a better environment for my children,» she says.

Reduce child poverty

The Liberal government says the new program will push nearly 300,000 Canadian children out of poverty.

«The poverty rate for children in Canada will fall from about 11.2 per cent to 6.7 per cent,» says Jean-Yves Duclos, the federal minister of Families, Children and Social Development, which is responsible for the program.

«Forty per cent of all children currently living in poverty will be lifted out of poverty, which will lead to the lowest poverty rate among children ever in Canada. It will also lead to the most significant fall in child poverty ever in our country,» he says.

«So it’s a huge impact, a transformation in the lives of families of almost six million children in Canada.»

Targeted vs. universal

The new program completely overhauls the system that was in place under the previous Conservative government.

«There is a real philosophical difference here. The previous [Conservative] program . believed that there should be some component of assistance for families that was universal. So just because you made a lot of money personally you shouldn’t be penalized, you shouldn’t be losing out and not getting any government benefits.» says Golombek.

«Whereas this new government, the Trudeau government, has said we are going to do this purely on income testing. Wealthier families can carry more of the load . they don’t need additional government handouts» he says.

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation — which supported the Conservative government’s UCCB — says its default view on broad-based entitlement programs is that the government should cut taxes and put more money back in people’s pockets.

At the same time, federal director Aaron Wudrick says his group is not necessarily against the new CCB as a means-tested payment.

«Our concern with the new CCB is that it is expensive: we’d have preferred if the new government simply had reallocated the cost of the old UCCB, rather than added to it,» says Wudrick.

«So in short, we are OK with the program in principle, but think the government should be scaling it back a touch so long as we are running a deficit.»

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