Community Identified Stream Канада


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Community Identified Stream Канада

The Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP)

The Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) is the first step in a two-step application process for a permanent resident visa to Canada. It is used to recruit and select immigrants who intend to settle in Nova Scotia.

The NSNP allows the Government of Nova Scotia to nominate applicants who can meet the province’s labour market and economic needs. The processing time for eligible applications can be completed within two months . Nominated applicants, along with their spouse and dependents, may become permanent residents following approval by the Canadian government.

Processing times for provincial nominee applications processed by visa offices outside Canada can be found here.

NSNP like all other Canadian PNP programs are subject to frequent changes — for up to date information on all rules, information and application forms visit NSNP web site .

Skilled Worker
For skilled workers who have a full-time job offer from a Nova Scotia employer.

The skilled worker must have a full-time, permanent job offer from a Nova Scotia employer before submitting an application to the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) . Provincial priorities may change as skill shortages are met by permanent residents or Canadian citizens.

Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers

The Office of Immigration differentiates between skilled workers, semi-skilled and low-skilled workers.

Skilled workers are defined as indiv >NOC skill level O, A or B . Priority will be awarded to these higher skilled occupations.

Semi-skilled workers have occupations that fall under the NOC skill level C occupations . The Office of Immigration may cons >6 months of work with the Nova Scotia employer supporting the application .

Low-skilled workers have occupations that fall under the NOC skill level D . The Office of Immigration may cons >the principal applicant has worked for at least 6 months with the Nova Scotia employer supporting the application, there are indicators of success in the application, and there is a strong employer support.

The Office of Immigration reserves the right to consider only certain types of jobs and occupations for nomination. This decision will depend on the current economic situation of the Nova Scotia labour market needs.

For skilled, semi-skilled and low-skilled workers, priority will be given to workers whose employers:
— have made a genuine effort to recruit qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents
— can demonstrate that they will provide additional supports to assist newcomers with their settlement needs.

Positions in all skill level occupations need to receive prevailing wages for their industry or sector as per the Government of Canada Web site www.workingincanada.gc.ca

International Graduate
For international graduates who have a full-time job offer from a Nova Scotia employer and have been working for the employer for at least three months .

The International Graduate stream helps Nova Scotia employers hire and retain international graduates.

The international graduate must have a full-time, permanent job offer, preferably related to their field of study from a Nova Scotia employer and be working for that employer for at least three consecutive months before submitting an application to the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP). Provincial priorities may change as skill shortages are met by permanent residents or Canadian citizens.

To be eligible to apply to the International Graduate stream, the graduate must have graduated within the last three years from a program of at least one academic year of full-time study in Canada and have received a certificate, diploma, or degree from a provincially-recognized institution in Canada. Applicants still in study are not eligible to this stream.

Community Identified
For individuals who have significant employment prospects, have a strong connection to a particular Nova Scotia community and have received a Letter of Identification from an Office of Immigration mandated organization.

The Community >who have strong connections to a Nova Scotia community , wish to live there permanently have excellent employment prospects, and can contribute to the labour market and economy of that specific community.

The applicant must have received a Letter of Identification from an organization mandated by the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration before submitting an application to the Nova Scotia Nominee Program. The list of organizations is found in Appendix 3 of the NSNP Community Identified Application Guide posted here.

The Community Identified candidate cannot be eligible for any other NSNP streams in order to apply to this category.

Family Business Worker
For workers who have received a full-time job offer from a Nova Scotia business owned by a close relative.

The Family Business Worker stream assists employers in hiring workers who are close relatives and have the work experience and required skills for positions employers may have been unable to fill with a permanent resident or Canadian citizen .

The family business worker must have a full-time, permanent job offer from a Nova Scotia employer who is a close relative and who owns an established business in Nova Scotia before submitting an application to the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP).

The worker or the spouse must be related to the family business owner or spouse of the business owner in one of the following ways. The worker is the business owner’s*:

  • Son or daughter
  • Brother or sister
  • Niece or nephew (children of brothers or sisters)
  • Uncle or aunt (parent’s brothers or sisters)
  • Grandchild

(* or a step or half-relative of the same degree)

Occupations

The Office of Immigration differentiates between skilled workers, semi-skilled and low-skilled workers as per the National Occupation Classification (NOC).

Skilled workersare defined as indiv >Priority will be awarded to these higher skilled occupations.

Semi-skilled workershave occupations that fall under the NOC skill level C occupations. The Office of Immigration may cons >six (6) months of work with the Nova Scotia employer supporting the application .

Low-skilled workershave occupations that fall under the NOC skill level D. The Office of Immigration may cons >the principal applicant has worked for at least six (6) months with the Nova Scotia employer supporting the application, there are indicators of success in the application, and there is a strong employer support.

The Office of Immigration reserves the right to consider only certain types of jobs and occupations for nomination. This decision will depend on the current economic situation of the Nova Scotia labour market needs.

For skilled, semi-skilled and low-skilled workers, priority will be given to workers whose employers:
— have made a genuine effort to recruit qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents
— can demonstrate that they will provide additional supports to assist newcomers with their settlement needs.

Positions in all skill level occupations need to receive prevailing wages for their industry or sector as per the Government of Canada Web site www.workingincanada.gc.ca

Criteria for Family Employer

  • You have been lived in Nova Scotia for a minimum of two years,
  • You own at least 33.3% of your business which has been in operation under current
    management for a minimum of two years,
  • Your business is financially viable and is able to meet the commitments of the position,
  • You are financially self-supporting, and have not received social assistance or
    employment assistance from the Government of Nova Scotia or of Canada within the
    last two years,
  • You are making a full time permanent job offer to your close family member or your
    spouse’s, or conjugal or common-law partner’s close family member for a job located in
    Nova Scotia in your business which meets certain criteria,
  • You or your spouse, or conjugal or common-law partner, may support the application of
    a Worker who is a family member once every two years.

When Not To Apply

The NSNP will not consider as the Worker:

  • A parent, grandparent, spouse, common-law or conjugal partner of a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident under this category. These individuals are encouraged to apply under the Government of Canada Family Class which exists for this purpose,
  • International students who are currently studying.

The following list provides some examples of the types of jobs and occupations that are not considered
appropriate for the NSNP.

  • Occupations that are seasonal, part-time, casual, or contractual,
  • Occupations that consist primarily of training, internship, and fellowship work placements,
  • Child minding or elder care services for the employer,
  • Live-in-caregiver positions — These positions should be processed under federal Citizenship and Immigration Canada guidelines,
  • Jobs that are not based in Nova Scotia.

How to apply
Application forms

Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominee
For individuals who are non-dependent adult children of Nova Scotia nominees who wish to enter the labour market and contribute to the economy of the province.

The Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominee streamis aimed at selecting individuals who are the non-dependent children of immigrants who were nominated under the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) . The principal applicant must plan to live in Nova Scotia permanently, have strong employment prospects and be able to contribute to the labour market and economy of Nova Scotia.

Employability of the applicant will be determined based on the current labour market needs of Nova Scotia. Nominee’s non-dependent children must have a minimum of one year of full-time work experience in the last five years in their field of studies and/or have the intention and ability to enter the Nova Scotia labour market.

The principal applicant can be in studies outside Canada and be eligible to apply to the Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominee stream if they have already have completed at least one year of post-secondary education and have received a degree, diploma or certificate issued by an accredited institution. The principal applicant is eligible to submit an application while pursuing an additional post-secondary degree, diploma or certificate.

Parent

Parents / nominees need to meet all the following criteria in order for their non-dependent child to be eligible to apply under the Non-Dependent Child of Nova Scotia Nominee stream.

  1. You are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada
  2. You have been nominated under the Nova Scotia Nominee Program
  3. You are the parent of a child who was named in your original application to the Nova Scotia Nominee Program on the IMM 0008 Generic – Application for Permanent Residence in Canada form or on the IMM 5406 – Additional Family Information form.
  4. You have established a family residence in Nova Scotia within six (6) months of obtaining permanent resident status in Canada, and you have remained a resident of this province .
  5. For newly arrived immigrants, you have been a resident of Nova Scotia for at least three (3) consecutive months immediately before this application is submitted and are still residing in Nova Scotia at the time of the submission of the Nova Scotia Nominee Program application for the non-dependent child.
  6. You remain a resident of Nova Scotia throughout the application process and are still a resident of this province when your child arrives in Nova Scotia with permanent resident status.

Please note that as a nominee, if you have left Nova Scotia to live in another Canadian province, you are not considered a resident of Nova Scotia, and therefore your non-dependent child is not eligible to apply under this stream. The minimum three months residency period applies to nominees who have just obtained their permanent residence in Canada and have established a residence in Nova Scotia.

How to apply
Application forms

Agri-Food Sector
For immigrants who plan to establish a business in Nova Scotia in the agriculture sector for primary and/or value added production.

The Agri-Food Sector pilot is aimed at immigrants interested in agri-food production and/or value added production . The pilot gives the opportunity to strengthen rural communities by creating jobs and growing the economy by bringing agricultural skills to Nova Scotia. The Agri-Food Sector pilot is a joint venture between the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration and the Nova Scotia Department of Agriculture.

The first step to applying to the Agri-Food Sector pilot is for you, the applicant, to come to Nova Scotia for a minimum of one five (5) working days exploratory visit to research farming opportunities . During this visit, you will meet with representatives of the Department of Agriculture who will inform and guide you in the Nova Scotia agri-food sector. You will also have an interview with a nominee officer from the Office of Immigration who will provide you with information about the application process.

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Some of the eligibility criteria:

  • The applicant needs to have a minimum of three years experience in the past five years in farm ownership , farm management or practical farming experience with skills relevant to Nova Scotia farming conditions.
  • You, the applicant, must plan to establish a farm, purchase a farm or become partner in an existing farm business. If investing in an existing farm business, you must control at least 33.33% and take an active part in the operation of the business .
  • You will be required to demonstrate that you have a minimum personal net worth of $150,000 (after relocation in Nova Scotia – before the farm is purchased). You will also be required to make a minimum investment of $100,000 in a new or existing farming operation in capital assets (land, machinery) or working capital .
  • You will submit a detailed agri-business plan with your application form. A template can be found here (pdf).

A qualifying farming business must demonstrate a minimum annual revenue of $10,000 CAD . Hobby farms are not eligible.

How to apply
Application forms

How to Apply for the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program

Call us Toll-Free: 1-866-449-5904


You may have an opportunity to fast track your Canadian permanent residence by applying for the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program (NSPNP).

Learn more below, and fill out our free immigration assessment form and we’ll get back to you within 24 hours to discuss your eligibility and options.

or call us Toll-Free: 1-866-449-5904

Do You Want To Work and Live in Nova Scotia?

Nova Scotia may be the second smallest Province in Canada but its natural resources are enormous and there is a growing demand for more highly skilled workers. The Province is a participant in the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) under which the provincial government of Nova Scotia can nominate foreign workers that qualify for the program.

Successful applicants will receive a Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Certificate, which will speed-up the Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa application process. Under the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), you may qualify under one of six streams.

Six Nova Scotia PNP Streams for Fast Track Canada Immigration

If you are interested in settling in Nova Scotia AND you meet the criteria of one of the SIX streams below you may be able to enter Canada in less time.

  1. Skilled Worker
  2. Family Business Worker
  3. Community-identified
  4. International Graduate
  5. Non-dependent Children of Nominees
  6. Agri-food sector stream

1) Skilled Worker

Requirements for the Skilled Worker Stream

A full-time permanent job offer from a NS employer;

The employer must have been unable to fill the position with a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident; and

The employer is offering the prevailing wages and working conditions for the industry.

Basic literacy in English; and

  • Minimum NS Grade 12 education.
  • 2) Family Business Worker

    Requirements for the Family Business Worker Stream

    Must have a permanent NS job offer from an employer who is a close relative and who owns a business in NS; and

    Must have skills, work experience, and licensing for the job.

    3) Community- >

    Requirements for the Community- >Have a strong established connection to a NS community;

    Have a letter of identification from an organization that is mandated by the NS Office of Immigration; and

  • Be employable and be able to contribute to the economy and the labour market of NS.
  • 4) International Graduate

    Requirements for the International Graduate Stream

    Have received a diploma, certificate or degree from a recognized Canadian post-secondary education w/in the past two years;

    Have a full-time and permanent job offer in the field of study from a NS employer;

    Have legal status in Canada; and

    Meet the minimum qualification requirements for the position and the minimum age, education and language ability.

    5) Non-dependent Children of Nominees

    Requirements for the Non-dependent Children of Nominees

    Be the non-dependent child of Canadian citizens or PRs in NS who immigrated through the NS PNP; and

  • Have a minimum of one year of full time work experience in their field of studies or demonstrate that they have employment prospects in NS.
  • 6) Agri-food Sector Stream

    Requirements for the Agri-food Sector Stream

    Have experience in farm ownership, practical farming, or farm management for a period of at least three years;

    Make a minimum equity investment in a new/existing farming operation;

    Have sufficient financial supports;

    Submit a detailed agri-business plan showing sufficient experience and knowledge of his/her chosen field of business; and

  • Meet the minimum qualifications requirements for the position and the minimum age, education and language ability.
  • Why Hire Us to Help with Your Nova Scotia PNP Application?

    While the procedures for applying for an Nova Scotia PNP may seem uncomplicated, some applicants apply without seeking any help from an immigration lawyer, thinking that they can “do it themselves”.

    For Nova Scotia PNPs, there is a higher risk of refusal in cases where the application is not properly prepared. The standards are very high.

    The documentation and processes involved in successfully obtaining a PNP are complex and usually require legal expertise.

    We have helped hundreds of individuals and their families successfully immigrate to Canada through the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program. Our experienced immigration lawyers will be able to assess your case and recommend a course of action to best serve your needs.

    The first step towards your Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program application is getting an assessment of your case. Fill out our free immigration assessment form and we will get back to you within 24 hours to discuss your eligibility and options.

    Nova Scotia Immigration Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)

    The Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program is an immigration program operated on behalf of the Government of the province by the Ministry of Employment and Immigration in conjunction with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to speed up the processing of an application for permanent residence.


    If you are unsure whether you qualify for immigration to Canada under the Provincial Nominee Program, book a consultation with one of our qualified immigration consultants.

    Index

    Land Mass: 55,000 km2

    Capital City: Halifax

    Major City/Attractions: Halifax, Sydney

    Industry: Fishery, Mining

    GDP Per Capita: $39,025

    Official Language: English

    General

    Nova Scotia is located in Canada’s southeastern coast. It is the most populous province in Atlantic Canada. Its capital, Halifax, is the major economic centre of the region. It is the second-smallest province in Canada. Its population makes it the fourth-least-populous province of the country, though second-most-densely populated. Nova Scotia is located on the east coast west of New Brunswick and south of Newfoundland.

    Industry

    Fishing and mining dominate Nova Scotia’s economy. The province also has a large aerospace and defence manufacturing industry. Also Nova Scotia has the 4th largest film industry in Canada. Nova Scotia boasts a strong tourism economy with over 200,000 cruise ship passengers flow through the port of Halifax each year.

    Climate

    Nova Scotia lies in the mid-temperate zone and, although the province is almost surrounded by water, the climate is closer to continental rather than maritime. Nova Scotia’s cold winters and warm summers are influenzed by the ocean. The province is surrounded by four major bodies of water, the Gulf of Saint Lawrence to the north, the Bay of Fundy to the west, the Gulf of Maine to the southwest, and Atlantic Ocean to the east.

    • Spring from 2° to 9° C
    • Summer from 16° to 24° C
    • Fall about 18° C
    • Winter about -3° C

    About the Nova Scotia Provincial Nominee Program

    This Program is designed to support the province’s economic growth by attracting foreign workers. Individuals nominated by the Province of Nova Scotia, together with their spouse and dependent children, are eligible to apply for a permanent resident visa as a Provincial Nominee. Immigroup helps applicants wishing to live and work in the province under the following Provincial Nominee Programs:

    Skilled Worker

    Applicants with a permanent, full-time employment offer with an employer in Nova Scotia with the required education, work experience, and other criteria can apply for the Skilled Worker program. They must also meet the minimum criteria for age, education, work experience, and language ability requirements for the federal skilled worker stream.

    Family Support

    Applicants have a guaranteed, permanent job offer in Nova Scotia from an employer who is a close relative and who owns an established business. A qualifying relationship must exist between the business owner and the applicant. Applicants must have legal status in the country of your residence

    Community Identified Stream

    Applicants cannot qualify for any other category of provincial nomination. Applicant must possess a Letter of Identification from a community organization and have the intention to live in Nova Scotia.

    Nova Scotia Nominee Program

    September 1, 2007 by wpengine

    The recently-signed Agreement for Canada-Nova Scotia Co-operation on Immigration removes the cap on the Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP) as a means to address labour market needs and declining population trends.

    So far in 2007, over 300 individuals have been nominated by Nova Scotia for Canadian Permanent Residency, and this number is expected to go beyond the 400 mark by December. Thanks to the new immigration agreement, which removed the existing the cap of 400 nominees per year, it can. Since 2002, the NSNP has been matching skilled immigrants with Nova Scotian employers and fast-tracking their Canadian immigration applications. The success of the program stimulated its recent expansion.

    To qualify for the Nova Scotia Nominee Program, applicants must have the intention to settle permanently in Nova Scotia, have sufficient settlement supports to do so, and have legal status in their country of residence. They must also meet the requirements of one of the five streams in the NSNP (Skilled Worker, Family Business Worker, Community Identified, Economic, International Graduate) including the minimum criteria for education, work experience, age, and language ability.

    Skilled Worker Stream – An employer-driven stream, applicants must have a full-time permanent job offer from a Nova Scotia employer and have the training and accreditation necessary for the position. Only certain occupations qualify under this stream, as the NSNP seeks to recruit workers with skills in demand by Nova Scotia businesses.

    Family Business Worker Stream – Nova Scotia employers can hire close relatives from abroad to fill permanent full-time positions in their family-owned businesses. The nominee must have the necessary qualifications for the job and must have a close family relationship (child, grandchild, sibling, aunt or uncle, niece or nephew) with the business owner or his/her spouse, common-law, or conjugal partner.

    Community Identified Stream – Applicants must have strong established connections to a mandated Nova Scotia community organization. A community-driven stream, the applicant must have a Letter of Identification from the nominating organization and have the intention and the ability to contribute to the labour force of that community. To apply under this stream, an individual cannot be eligible for any other NSNP stream.

    Economic Stream – Currently the Nova Scotia government is not accepting any new applications under this stream. It will soon be redesigned to nominate experienced business managers and entrepreneurs for immigration to Nova Scotia. Canadavisa.com will report on the changes when they are announced by the provincial government.

    International Graduate Stream – Eligible international graduates have graduated from a recognized Nova Scotia post-secondary institution within the past two years. Their certificate, diploma, or degree must be for a program of at least one academic year. The applicant must have been working in his/her field of study for a Nova Scotia employer for at least three months on a Temporary Work Permit and have a permanent full-time job offer from that employer.

    About wpengine

    This is the «wpengine» admin user that our staff uses to gain access to your admin area to provide support and troubleshooting. It can only be accessed by a button in our secure log that auto generates a password and dumps that password after the staff member has logged in. We have taken extreme measures to ensure that our own user is not going to be misused to harm any of our clients sites.

    Канада: миграционная программа Global Talent Stream

    Всем привет. Решился рассказать про эту миграционную программу, когда понял, что по-русски о ней найти что-то сложно. Настолько сложно, что одного пикабушника в комментариях я даже не смог убедить в том, что она правда существует 🙂

    Итак, Global Talent Stream (GTS) — пилотная программа в рамках Temporary Work Permit, позволяющая удалённо получить временное разрешение на работу на два года по упрощённой схеме. Здесь идёт более простой список документов, не требуется сдача экзамена по английскому, подтверждение дипломов, да и в принципе не нужно набирать баллы, как это делается в том же Federal Skilled Worker. Как бонус, большинство заявлений по программе рассматривается всего за две недели, но лично мне тут сильно не повезло.

    После одного года работы в стране можно подаваться на ПВЖ по программе Canadian Experience Class, что опять же будет полегче, чем Federal Skilled Worker. Чувствуете? Эта программа выглядит как прямой аналог европейской Blue Card, только с некоторыми отличиями.

    Требования к кандидатам

    0) Вы должны найти работодателя, который готов получить нужные документы и взять вас на работу;

    1) оклад на вашей должности в Канаде должен быть выше определённого значения, установленного программой (как правило это 80’000 CAD в год);

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    2) у вас должно быть «продвинутое» знание области работы;

    3) вы должны иметь:

    3.1) «продвинутое» профильное образование и/или;

    3.2) пять и более лет опыта работы по специальности.

    Главным образом всё упирается в пункт #0, с которым (как и в случае с Blue Card) больше всего везёт программистам: есть кадровые агентства, которые ведут как раз такие вакансии и затаскивают на работу иностранцев.

    Работодатель должен быть готов к геморрою, и тут есть два варианта:

    1) для большинства специальностей работодатель должен убедить партнёра GTS в том, что такой сотрудник им действительно необходим и что в Канаде его найти сложно;

    2) если ваша специальность находится в особом списке в рамках этой программы (увы, там почти одно IT под разным соусом), работодатель может выдохнуть, с партнёрами можно не заморачиваться.

    Но в любом случае ему придётся получить положительное заключение LMIA (Labour Market Impact Assesment) — оценки воздействия на трудовой рынок, которую выдаёт Отдел занятости и социальной политики. Эта оценка должна подтвердить, что ваш найм действительно необходим и что канадская экономика и рынок труда из-за вас не пострадают. Ну и кроме того работодатель предоставляет свою финансовую отчётность, чтобы доказать, что он действительно в состоянии выплачивать нарисованную в договоре зарплату.

    Список необходимых документов от кандидата

    Предположим, что всё получилось и своего работодателя вы нашли. Тогда для подачи заявления от вас потребуется (не считая дактилоскопии и прохождения медицинского осмотра):

    1) письма-подтверждения факта работы от предыдущих работодателей;

    4) трудовая книжка;

    6) договор с вашим канадским работодателем;

    7) заполненная форма с информацией о семье;

    8) заявление на разрешение на работу;

    9) «доказательство того, что вы на эту работу подходите».

    В качестве последнего обычно выступают переводы ваших дипломов и штука, которую можно было бы назвать «Cover Letter».

    27 лет, не женат, программист с официальным стажем в 5 лет и магистратурой по теоретической информатике. У меня вписаться в этот волшебный срок в две недели не получилось, не получилось даже получить Work Permit с первого раза 🙂


    27 декабря я получил оффер от компании, у которой LMIA уже был на руках, так что в тот же день я подписал договор и побежал отправлять на перевод гору документов. После отправки заявления я прошёл у себя в городе осмотр (анализы крови, флюрография и опросник) и съездил в Москву сдать отпечатки пальцев. IRCC (Министерство гражданства и иммиграции Канады) молчали месяц, а потом запросили какой-то необычный список дополнительных документов:

    2) выписка из пенсионного фонда;

    3) трудовая книжка;

    4) данные по финансовой отчётности канадской фирмы-нанимателя за два года и данные об их организационной структуре.

    Этот запрос очень сильно удивил и меня, и канадского HR’а, но мы решили, что в московском визовом офисе просто не слышали про GTS. Мы молча отправили все требуемые документы, и неделю спустя получили отказ с двумя причинами: «вы не смогли доказать, что сможете адекватно выполнять эту работу» и «вы не смогли доказать, что этот оффер настоящий».

    На следующий день мы подали заявление повторно через юриста в визовый офис в Эдмонтоне, предоставив только обязательные документы. Заявление застряло на «security background check» на 3 месяца, и буквально на прошлой неделе IRCC написали, что пора отправлять им свой паспорт (я пишу этот пост, ожидая курьера, который мне его вернёт).

    Надеюсь, что этот пост кому-нибудь пригодится.

    Краткий обзор программы — вряд ли это можно назвать рекламой этого юриста, потому что без канадского работодателя он соискателю из РФ никак не поможет;

    Canada’s Project Naming: > By Jessica Murphy BBC News, Toronto

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    A photo identifying effort by Canada’s national archives that started in the country’s remote north is helping name indigenous Canadians in archival images — and bringing the country a step closer to reconciliation by correcting historical wrongs.

    Janet Brewster did not expect to see a baby photo of her mother in a press release.

    But there she was, Ms Brewster was sure of it, her mother Betty’s chubby arms resting on her older sister’s back, eyes looking directly at the camera.

    «It was the eyes, eyebrows and hair that really struck me and I thought ‘Oh my gosh, that has to be my mom,’ because it looked so much like my youngest son,» she says.

    Ms Brewster emailed the image to her mother, now 69, who confirmed it was indeed her as a child, along with Ms Brewster’s aunt Bella, their two brothers and a third, still unnamed, boy.

    The image of the siblings, a snapshot taken when the family was living in a remote Hudson’s Bay Company trading post and spent many of their days together, was being used by Library and Archives Canada to promote Project Naming, an initiative to help communities identify indigenous Canadians captured in photos in the archive’s extensive collection.

    That coincidence eventually led Betty Brewster to identifying a handful of other previously anonymous Inuit people in digitised images at the national archives, and other images of her and Bella, now 78.

    «It started with that first photograph,» Ms Brewster says.

    Project Naming was first launched as a small one-off project with the goal of identifying Inuit people from the territory of Nunavut who had been photographed by Canadian government bureaucrats and employees working in the far north from the late 1800s to the mid-20th century.

    The images rarely made their way back to the remote communities, but eventually ended up in the national archives, a repository responsible for collecting all significant government records in need of preservation.

    As was convention at the time, many of the white people in the images were named for the record. The indigenous subjects were not.

    «Most photos were described as being native, native-type, half-breed, Eskimo, or simply ignored in the photographs,» says Beth Greenhorn, who has been heading the project for the archives since 2003.

    «Terminology has changed and, because we are dealing with historical records that were created decades ago, I find it a bit painful to go through.»

    Updating the official record and terminology is one part of the project.

    The other is helping youth connect with their community elders to better understand their past.

    Ms Brewster says most of her family now knows the names of the children in the old images. Like family photos do, the images spurred a conversation about what their lives were like and where they were living.

    Among the stories they shared with their family were Betty Brewster’s time as an interpreter-translator for the Nunavut land claims agreement that led to the creation of Canada’s newest territory.

    «When you talk about reconciliation and about moving forward as a country and as indigenous people, Inuit people living in this country, naming people in those historic photographs is so important,» Ms Brewster says.

    «When you acknowledge people have names, it lends more credence to their life experience.»

    The project was inspired by Murray Angus, who oversaw a college programme for Inuit youth that brought them to the Canadian capital of Ottawa to study Inuit history, land claims, culture and language.

    In the early days of the project, the pictures were transferred onto CDs and brought north by the students to be shared at community gatherings and to visits to elders for identification.

    The project now uses social media outreach on Twitter and Facebook, where people can share the photos and offer clues.

    Ms Greenhorn says it gives her «goosebumps» when she sees someone recognise a family member or even a photograph of their much younger selves in the images.

    «It is this very elemental human reaction that it just drives the project forward,» she says.

    Images, now posted weekly, showcase the austere beauty of Canada’s Arctic regions and its people, and glimpses into the past lives of ndigenous Canadians across what was a largely rural nation.

    They also portray some of the darker parts of Canada’s relationship with its indigenous people, including photos of children in the residential school system, which removed them from their homes and aimed to eliminate their culture.

    The project is now entering its 15th year and has been expanded to include anonymous photographs from First Nations, Metis and Inuit people across Canada and all its northern territories.

    Since the project’s launch in 2002, about 10,000 images have been digitised. More than 2,500 people, places, and activities they are participating in have been identified.

    Ms Greenhorn admits the number does not seem high but believes that each person named counts.

    «Some of these portraits are so beautiful and they represent a life that was lived, someone that’s contributed to their community that had a family and to not have a name for them is sad,» she says.

    «So when you do make a connection, when you get a name and add it to the record it’s exciting and you think OK — there’s one more done.»

    Body found in stream >The body of a woman found in a stream just outside Winnipeg this week has been identified as a 17-year-old girl who had gone missing on previous occasions.

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    The body found in a stream just outside Winnipeg this week has been identified as a 17-year-old girl who had gone missing on previous occasions.

    Cherisse Houle’s body was found on Wednesday by construction workers levelling trenches near the riverbank in the Rural Municipality of Rosser, about 16 kilometres west of Winnipeg. She was discovered at about 3 p.m., according to the RCMP.

    An autopsy was conducted on Thursday in Winnipeg. However, the cause of death remains undetermined, according to the RCMP, which has been investigating the site where Houle’s body was located.

    Houle, from Winnipeg, was one of four aboriginal teens and women who were the subject of a news release issued in late May by the Winnipeg Police Service and Child Find Manitoba. The missing people were highlighted as part of National Missing Children’s Day.

    Not long after that, Houle returned home but then went missing once again. She was last reported missing to the police on June 26.

    Sources told CBC News that Houle was a chronic runaway and a known sex trade worker who was in the care of the provincial Child and Family Services agency.

    Bernadette Smith, whose sister, Claudette Osborne, has been missing since last July, said Manitoba needs a specific police task force for missing and murdered women. The province has earmarked $2.4 million for programs to combat sexual exploitation, but Smith is lobbying for a dedicated task force like that in Edmonton.

    That city’s Project KARE has a mandate to fully investigate all cases involving missing or murdered high-risk persons like sex trade workers.

    «This [Houle] case, unfortunately, is going to push us even further to talk to the mayor of our city and the police because it is their duty to protect the citizens of our city. Women are going missing and there’s not enough being done,» Smith said.

    Anyone with information regarding Houle’s whereabouts on or after June 26 is asked to contact the Headingley RCMP detachment at 1-204-888-0358 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

    The Global Talent Stream: Canada’s commitment to skilled workers

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    Since being introduced in June 2020, nearly 40,000 people have moved to Canada under the Global Talent Stream, Canada’s answer to an economy in need of highly-skilled workers. Of these newcomers to Canada, nearly 24,000 are highly skilled workers in occupations such as computer programming, information system analysis and software engineering.

    So, what’s the Global Talent Stream all about?

    The GTS, part of Canada’s Global Skills Strategy, is an immigration program that allows Canadian employers to expedite the hiring of foreign workers to fill specialized occupations when Canadians aren’t available for specific roles.

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) aims to process Global Talent Stream work permit applications in only two weeks, making the program the fastest immigration pathway for workers seeking a new life in Canada.

    Consequently, it’s easy to see why more than 1,100 Canadian employers have used the Global Talent Stream between June 2020 and June 2020. These employers have committed to creating more than 48,000 jobs and more than 12,500 pa >$113 million in skills development and training.

    GTS for Employers
    GTS for Foreign Workers

    What is the Global Talent Stream?

    GTS applications are processed under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP), a collection of work permit streams that brings newcomers to Canada on temporary work permits to fill specific labour needs. GTS is the wing of the TFWP for highly-skilled workers in specialized occupations, prioritizing those with experience in engineering and tech-related fields.

    The Global Talent Stream was introduced in June, 2020 as a two-year pilot program. The program is jointly managed by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). Since being introduced, thousands of skilled foreign workers have successfully moved to Canada through the GTS, with many more workers expected to arrive in the years to come.

    In the 2020 Federal Budget the government announced the program would become a permanent fixture in Canadian immigration, giving “local businesses expedited and predictable access to top global talent.”

    Why does Canada need GTS?

    Canadians recognize the importance of immigration to the economy. With the highest job vacancy rate in decades, immigration is necessary in Canada to ensure the country has enough workers to fill its many open positions. GTS is one of the many ways in which Canada welcomes foreign workers to contribute economically.

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    The Global Talent Stream also helps Canada to remain competitive in the global market, especially with regards to Canada’s southern neighbour, the United States. In recent years, the United States has implemented increasingly restrictive immigration policies for their H-1B visa program which, similar to the GTS, has allowed skilled workers to work temporarily in the US.

    Under the Trump Administration, H-1B visa applicants have encountered the suspension of premium processing and an increase in the number of Requests for Evidence (RFEs) and visa denials . With Canada’s increasingly relaxed immigration requirements and high rate of job openings, many skilled workers are choosing Canada over the United States in a phenomenon that’s been deemed Canada’s brain gain . Another difference between the GTS and the H-1B is that spouses and partners of GTS applicants bound for Canada may obtain an open work permit, allowing them to work in Canada for any employer and to switch jobs if they wish to do so; spouses and partners of H-1B workers bound for the US may experience difficulty in securing the right to work in that country under proposed changes .

    The GTS is an excellent option for Canadian employers who need to fill specialized positions quickly and for foreign nationals with highly-skilled work experience, especially in engineering and tech-related fields. In the next two sections, we’ll look over the eligibility requirements and application procedure for Canadian employers and for foreign workers .

    How does the GTS work? — Employers

    All TFWP immigration streams use Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIAs) to determine if a Canadian employer can hire a foreign worker. An LMIA is a document that assesses whether or not an available position can be filled by a Canadian worker. A positive LMIA indicates that there is no Canadian talent available to fill a position, thereby enabling the employer to hire someone from outside of the country.

    Normally, an LMIA application takes months to prepare, submit, and process. With the GTS, many steps to the LMIA application are removed and the processing time is much faster. This allows Canadian employers to remain competitive in the global market, quickly bringing in talent to fill labour market needs.

    In order to be eligible for the Global Talent Stream, a Canadian employer must fit one of two categories:

    Category A – Designated Partner Referral:

    To be eligible through this category, the Canadian employer must be referred by one of the GTS designated partner organizations, and be hiring unique and specialized talent. To find a referral, interested employers can consult the list of designated partners below and contact those most relevant to their industry.

    This list was most recently updated in July, 2020:

    Designated Partners — Global Talent Stream
    Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
    BC Tech Association
    Burlington Economic Development Corporation
    Business Development Bank of Canada
    Canadian Economic Development for Quebec Regions
    Cape Breton Partnership
    City of Hamilton’s Economic Development Office
    Communitech Corporation
    Council of Canadian Innovators
    Economic Development Winnipeg
    Edmonton Economic Development
    Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
    Genesis (Newfoundland)
    Global Affairs Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service
    Government of Alberta, Alberta Labour
    Government of British Columbia, Ministry of Jobs, Trade and Technology
    Government of Manitoba, Manitoba Education and Training
    Government of Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Business Inc.
    Government of Ontario, Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration – Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program
    Government of Ontario, Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation, and Trade – Ontario Investment Office
    Government of Prince Edward Island, Island Investment Development Inc.
    Government of Saskatchewan, Ministry of the Economy
    Halifax Partnership
    ICT Association of Manitoba (ICTAM)
    Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada — Accelerated Growth Service
    Invest Ottawa
    Invest in Canada
    Launch Academy
    London Economic Development Corporation
    MaRS Discovery District
    National Research Council — Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP)
    Privy Council Office, Special Projects Team
    Regional Municipality of York
    Vancouver Economic Commission
    Venn Innovation
    Waterloo Region Economic Development Corporation
    WindsorEssex Economic Development Corporation
    As of July, 2020

    To be considered unique and specialized talent, the employee being hired must be paid a minimum of CAD $80,000 per year (or higher if the occupation’s annual prevailing wage is above this level), plus demonstrate advanced knowledge of the industry through either an advanced degree in a specialized area or at least five years of experience in a specialized position.

    Category B – In-Demand Occupation:

    To be eligible through this category, the Canadian employer must be hiring to fill a position on the Global Talent Occupations List, a list of high-skilled, in-demand occupations. In addition, the position must pay a salary equal to or above the prevailing wage for the position.

    This list was most recently updated in July, 2020:

    Global Talent Occupations List
    NOC Code Occupation Minimum Wage Requirement (annual) Minimum Wage Requirement (hourly)
    0213 Computer and information systems managers Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers) Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    Sub-set of 2161* Mathematicians and statisticians (Positions for actuaries or related occupations are excluded from this subset) Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2171 Information systems analysts and consultants Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2172 Database analysts and data administrators Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2173 Software engineers and designers Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2174 Computer programmers and interactive media developers Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2175 Web designers and developers Prevailing wage Prevailing wage
    2281 Computer network technicians $82,000 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    $39.42 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    2283 Information systems testing technicians $80,000 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    $38.46 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    Sub-set of 5131 Producer, technical, creative and artistic director and project manager – Visual effects and video game (The position requires 3+ years of experience in the visual effects, video game and/or animation industries) $78,000 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    $37.50 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    Sub-set of 5241 Digital media designers (The position requires 3+ years of job experience in at least one of the following digital media design skills: 3D modeling, compositing, paint and roto, layout and match move, digital environment and Matte painting, texture, lighting shading, character effects, effects and simulations, design and scenario, rigging, user interface or user experience, responsive design (for gaming), virtual reality, augmented reality, digital media animation, levels editing for digital media design, software editing for digital media design, pipeline software development or applications relevant for digital media design) $80,000 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    $38.46 or higher prevailing wage
    (Please note Quebec has unique wage requirements)
    Last updated July, 2020

    Once an employer has confirmed their eligibility for one of the two streams, they can begin their GTS application. The application form is available on the GTS website and can be submitted online, by mail, or by fax. The application requires information regarding the employer, the foreign worker, as well as the job offer, including details about compensation and benefits.

    All employers applying to GTS for the first time must also submit a Labour Market Benefits Plan demonstrating how they will benefit the Canadian labour market by hiring a foreign worker. Each application must identify one mandatory benefit. For Category A, employers must show how they will increase jobs creation for Canadians and for Category B, employers must show how they will increase skills and training investment for Canadians. Additionally, employers must show how they will achieve two complementary benefits from this list:

    • Job creation
    • Investment in skills and training
    • Increase in workplace diversity
    • Knowledge transfer
    • Enhanced company performance
    • Best company practices or policies

    Finally, employers must pay a processing fee of CAD $1,000 per foreign national they wish to hire.

    GTS applications are typically processed in 10 business days. If an application is successful, the employer will receive a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) which enables the foreign worker to apply for a work permit . Work permit applications that are submitted for a GTS position also qualify for expedited processing: averaging 10 business days!

    Are you an employer based in Quebec?

    If so, you’ll also have to submit your application to Quebec’s Ministère de l’Immigration, de la Diversité et de l’Inclusion (MIDI), as Quebec jointly manages immigration applications with the federal government.

    Your perfect role is waiting for you.

    Visit the Moving2Canada Jobs Board to view open positions across a range of industries.

    View the latest positions

    How does the GTS work? — Foreign Workers

    As a foreign worker, the first thing to understand is that you cannot apply directly to the Global Talent Stream. Only a Canadian employer can apply to the GTS, and the foreign worker(s) they wish to hire are listed on the application. This means that if you want to get a GTS work permit, your first goal should be to land a job offer from a Canadian employer who qualifies for the program.

    As discussed above, there are two GTS categories through which a Canadian employer can apply.

    • Category A is for employers who are referred by designated partners of the GTS and who are hiring unique and specialized talent.
    • Category B is for employers who are hiring for positions on the Global Talent Occupations List.

    If you are a worker hoping to find a job offer that qualifies under the GTS, you should check to see if you meet the definition of “unique and specialized talent” or if your occupation falls on the Global Talent Occupations List.

    If you believe that you meet the conditions for one of the GTS categories, then your next step is securing a job offer. In addition to building your network of contacts , we also suggest consulting the Moving2Canada Jobs Board to search for available positions. The Government of Canada also operates a Job Bank database where you may be able to find positions aligned with the GTS.

    Again, you cannot apply directly to the GTS, so after securing a job offer, your employer will have to submit an application that includes your information. If the employer’s application is successful, they will receive a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). You can use this LMIA to apply for a Canadian work permit that will be processed in around 10 business days.

    Once you are approved to obtain a work permit, you’ll be authorized to travel to Canada and start your new job!

    It’s also worth noting that even though the GTS only results in a temporary work permit, the program is an excellent pathway to permanent immigration to Canada. Many Canadian immigration programs require a person to have one year of Canadian work experience in order to qualify. This includes the Canadian Experience Class of Express Entry , as well as a host of Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) streams. Once you have a year of experience, chances are you’ll be in a great position to pursue Canadian permanent resident status .

    Canada is on track to welcome more than one million new immigrants between 2020 and 2021, with nearly two-thirds of those immigrants coming through economic streams. In the current immigration system, young, highly-skilled workers with Canadian experience are prioritized for permanent immigration, so participating in GTS is a smart way to set yourself up for a future in Canada.

    If you want to learn more about the Canadian immigration process, register for a Moving2Canada account ! You’ll receive our Getting Started Guide, as well as regular updates about important updates to Canadian immigration programs.

    Community Identified Stream Канада

    Identify the contents of a Node stream based on the presence of a file signature (magic number). Can be extended to check for additional file formats.

    Some file formats have two or more different variants, each with their own distinct file signature. Where this is the case the result object will feature an additional subtype property as seen below:

    Detecting Custom Formats

    Instances of IdentifyStream may be extended to detect additional file formats. See Defining Custom Formats for more information.

    formats The node streams highWaterMark setting. Default: 16384

    Defining Custom Formats

    Instances of IdentifyStream may be configured to detect file formats beyond those already supported. To do so, use the formats option to provide one or more Format objects. See /data/formats.json for examples.

    Each Format object should have either a signature or a subtypes property.

    Property Type Description
    extension String The file formats’s extension
    mime String The file formats’s MIME type.
    signature Signature ⎮ Signature[] One or more Signature objects. Identity-Stream will only match with this format if all signatures are present in the stream.
    subtypes Subtype ⎮ Subtype[] One or more Subtype objects. Identity-Stream will match with this format if any subtype’s signature matches.
    Property Type Description
    name String The name of this subtype
    signature Signature ⎮ Signature[] One or more Signature objects. Identity-Stream will only match with this subtype if all signatures are present in the stream.
    Property Type Description
    value String The signature to check for (in hex format).
    offset Number The offset of the signatue in bytes.

    The complete event is emitted when the stream has succesfully identified the stream file format, or ruled out all known file formats. Callback functions attached to this event receive an object describing streamed file, or null if the format is not recognized.

    The error event is emitted when the stream encounters an unexpected situation, for example if it is connected to an object stream.

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