House sitting Канада


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House sitting Канада

Unlike with the last house sitting gig in Spain, I won’t be bothering you with daily updates from Calgary. For one, I’ll spend most of the time inside because it’s rather chilly weather, albeit interrupted by some mild days. Hence, this is the time for writing, so you can expect a lot of older stories from Andalusia to Yerevan.

But I know you are curious about the cat and the house at which I will be living for the next three months.

Please meet Alice, a very beautiful, lovely and cuddly cat.

As soon as I sit down, she climbs into my lap, so I can’t get up for hours. I have deposited books next to every couch and sofa to be prepared. She also loves to watch “Fargo”.

This is the house.

This is where I go running. (The story about snow in Canada seems to have been a myth.)

And this is the sunset.

Or maybe it’s a different house because I want to protect the owners’ privacy, but you get the idea.

Canadians have crazy huge cars, often bigger than their houses. One advantage of this: with one trip to the supermarket, I could get all the stuff I need for three months.

Yes, I am seriously driving that thing. I am even thinking of making it a career.

House sitting assignments in Canada

CAT-SIT in rural Newfoundland this winter!

Canada, Division No. 6, Newfoundland and Labrador

Hi! We run an eco-hostel in southwest Newfoundland and are looking for someone to look after our 5 cats while we go out west for two months this winter. The housesitter would have to want to sleep with our old cat Spud who is 19 and really loves cuddles. The other four are more independent…

  • 1 month, 2 weeks, available from November 2020
  • Cat(s)

Offgr > Canada, River John, Nova Scotia

Someone who is an animal lover, experience with cats (x5), dogs (x1) & chickens (x12). Twice daily feedings. Dog walks. Keeping house tidy, e.g. sweeping of animal hairs, dust, dirt tracked in. Maintaining a warm house using a woodstove (no central heating), so pipes don’t freeze.…

  • 2 months, 1 week, available from November 2020
  • Dog(s), Cat(s), Chicken(s)

Cat Sitter, One Week in December 2020 — Ottawa, Canada

Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

Looking for a responsible couple. Must be animal lovers and respectful of our home. Experience taking care of cats is essential. Must stay over night, every night. This job will have very few responsibilities. My cat (Frank) is pretty independent, although he does appreciate a cuddle…

  • 1 week, 1 day, available from December 2020
  • Cat(s)

Owen Sound Ontario Dog Sitter Needed

Canada, Owen Sound, Ontario

I need pet sitting for my lovely dog Bella. She is 10 years old and in great health. Daily walks and feeding (she loves her treats) Basically care for my home and dog while I am away. Some plants to water, keep the place clean and tidy. Its a two bedroom 1 bath Owen Sound is an awesome…

  • 1 month, 5 days, available from December 2020
  • Dog(s)

COTTAGE IN PONEMAH— LAKES > Canada, Winnipeg Beach, Manitoba

I’m looking for a person / couple / small family to enjoy a winter holiday in my cute cottage in Ponemah! Must love dogs, wood fires, and tranquility. I supply the comfy cottage, including hydro, wood (for fireplace) internet, tv with netflix, etc) my getaway beside Lake! — and…

  • 3 weeks, 4 days, available from December 2020
  • Dog(s), Cat(s)

Mountain retreat

Canada, Parson, British Columbia

My home is a forested retreat overlooking the Columbia Valley. I have 2 horses that receives food supplements 2 times a day. I have 2 young cats that love their morning treat, as they’ll tell you over and over and . We can get snow, but that’s a bonus if you’re a skier. I also…

  • 1 week, available from December 2020
  • Dog(s), Cat(s), Horse/Donkey(s)


Christmas housesit in beautiful Maple R > Canada, Maple Ridge, British Columbia

Looking for someone who loves animals, especially dogs and cats. Responsible, clean and enjoys walks once or twice a day. Really just want you to enjoy our home and make it your own while here over Christmas. Would love it if our girl can be walked at least once or twice a day. She…

  • 1 week, available from December 2020
  • Dog(s), Cat(s)

Cozy Bungalow — Great Location!

Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba

An individual or couple who are responsible, non-smokers, non-drug-users, and non-drinkers, who will keep the place clean and not cause any damage, who will not waste water or gas or electricity unnecessarily. Clean up after yourself, bring in the mail, keep track of when the snow…

  • 2 weeks, 1 day, available from December 2020

House/pet sitting week of Christmas

Canada, Calgary, Alberta

I am looking for someone who is responsible and trustworthy to stay in our townhouse while we are away for Christmas, and who has experience caring for dogs and cats. Responsibilities would be to care for our rescue pup, Scout, and senior rescue kitty, Bianca. Scout needs to be walked…

  • 5 days, available from December 2020
  • Dog(s), Cat(s)

Housesitter Required Dec 28-April 30/20

Canada, Edmonton, Alberta

We are looking for a reliable cat lover to live in our home from December 28-April 30/20 to take care of our home and our two cats. Our housesitter will care for our indoor only cats and ensure that they are fed, litter boxes are cleaned and that they feel comfortable and safe. Our…

  • 4 months, 3 days, available from December 2020
  • Cat(s)

Reliable and loving Pet Sitter wanted for small 11 lbs dog that is my world

Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia

I need a good , loving petsitter that enjoys the companionship of a small dog. Would be willing to have them stay in my luxury home in downtown Vancouver , Canada. If the right person. Wanting a retired person. not working .Someone with references personally and financially. Non-smoker…

  • 4 weeks, 1 day, available from January 2020
  • Dog(s)

Enjoy Canada’s Capital in Winter

Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

We are looking for an individual or couple that would like to explore Ottawa in January. It’s cold! But we are Canada’s capital and we boast the world’s longest outdoor skating rink 🙂 This is an easy housesit. walk Shaggy a couple of times per day. one of them being a trip…

  • 3 weeks, 4 days, available from January 2020
  • Dog(s)

Newer Carefree Bungalow

Canada, Glencoe, Ontario

Would like a person or couple who will take care of my home as if it were their own. Smoking only allowed outside. Please, only those who are available for the weeks of February 1 to 29 2020. I will not respond to any other requests. House sitter must provide own transportation -…

  • 4 weeks, available from January 2020

LOVE CATS AND NATURE.

Canada, Pembroke, Ontario

CAT SIT ON OTTAWA RIVER! We are looking for a quiet, respectful, clean, responsible non-smoking person or couple to take care of our cat and home. Solid references required. Must love cats. No drugs, no parties, no smoking, no drama, no children, no other guests allowed. Our cat…

  • 1 week, 4 days, available from February 2020
  • Cat(s)


Housesitter needed for March Break

Canada, Milton, Ontario

We are looking for a responsible adult able to care for four senior cats and one kitten. The house sitter is needed from March 13-23. Sitter can arrive early and stay a few days longer if needed. The house sitter will need to provide food and water to the cats, scoop litter boxes…

  • 1 week, 3 days, available from March 2020
  • Cat(s)

House in the foothills of Rockies in British Columbia

Canada, Burton, British Columbia

PLEASE NOTE THE DATES LISTED Our listing is 8 months long term (September 25th(+/-), 2020 — May 15th (+/-), 2021) ============================================================ Greetings, We are looking for mature, experienced and very independent house sitter, preferably a couple,…

  • 7 months, 2 weeks, available from September 2020
  • Cat(s)

House Sitting: Travel Cheap, Stay For Free

House Sitting, what a great way to travel and see Canada on a budget. This is an excellent alternative to backpacker places and hotels. Basically, you take care of someone’s property in exchange for free accommodation.

The only cost to you is the joining fee to one of the many house sitting sites online. The fee ranges anywhere from $25 to $150 per year.

Rather than following the tourist track, you will get to know locals and their lifestyle and live in places you may have never been able to afford otherwise. The house sitting duties often include looking after pets, maintaining a garden, doing some yard work and keeping the place tidy. If you opt for ranch sitting, then the duties extend to looking after horses and livestock.

I have never done house sitting but had ranch sitters looking after my ranch many times when I was away. So I definitely know what it is all about.

House sitting can become your way of travel. The money you save on accommodation is significant. On top of that, you get to enjoy many amazing travel experiences which would have never been possible otherwise.

Is House Sitting For You?

House sitting might not be a good fit if you feel rushed and only have a limited time available and you want to see as much of the country as possible. On the other hand, if you are not in a rush and prefer to travel cheap and longer, house sitting could be an excellent choice for you. Instead of just travelling miles, you stay put for a while and make yourself useful.

Jobs range from just a weekend to a few months. This means that even if you are a short time traveller, you still can fit the experience into your travel itinerary. Lots of different house sitting jobs are available.

This is also a good option for families, needing a bigger place to stay. It gives you the opportunity to travel on a low budget and the whole family can get involved with the house sitting tasks and get to know a new community. It is a give and take deal. You get a free place to stay and the homeowner gets a valuable service in return.

Who Qualifies For House Sitting

Being independent with some experience under the belt is a good start. Try house sitting for friends or family before you leave home to see whether this type of travel suits you. Having at least one good reference will give you a better chance of being accepted when you apply. References make it easier to convince a stranger in another country that you can be trusted and can do the job.

A house sitting job has to be taken seriously. In exchange for free accommodation, you are expected to take care of someone’s place and possessions, and maybe their furry animals.

House Sitting Websites

There are several good house sitting websites out there to match homeowners with house sitters. All of them require a membership fee. Now you will probably ask which site is the best. If the best is chosen by the success rate, then the best house sitting site has to be TrustedHousesitters. Check out the others as well and see what you think.

Thankfully there are so many websites to choose from. One will become your favourite as soon as you secure your first assignment.

TrustedHousesitters

TrustedHousesitters.com is the world’s largest and fastest growing house and pet sitting website. The website has won many awards and offers the most choices for house sitters. When listening to the amazing stories told by travellers about their incredible TrustedHousesitters experiences, it doesn’t come as a surprise that the website is on top of the list. TrustedHousesitters is also my choice to sign up as a homeowner looking for ranch sitters.

TrustedHousesitters offers thousands of house sitting opportunities worldwide.

Membership fee: $96 Annual

MindMyHouse.com

This is a well-made website and offers a good number of house-sits.

The biggest draw for MindMyHouse is the cheap yearly membership. It’s one of the cheapest amongst the international sites.

Membership fee: $20 Annual

HouseCarers

HouseCarers is another thriving site with a g cheap fee and high quantity of assignments. Still, with around 300 active assignments per month, they are quite a bit behind TrustedHousesitters who has a monthly total of 1000+ available sits.

Membership fee: $50 Annual


Nomador

Nomador is the newest addition to the house sitting landscape and I love their website structure. It is easy to navigate and has an easy to use a search engine.

Membership fee: $89 Annual

Tips On How To Get Started

  • Write a great profile – First impressions count and a well-written profile can quickly move you to the top of the homeowner’s list of sitters applications to reply to.
  • Get these references – When sending reference requests, also include references from past employers and friends. Having more references will give you a better chance to get the house sitting job you applied for.
  • House sit and pet sit before you leave home – This is very important to get experience. House sit for friends or family, or find a house sitting job via house sitting sites and spend some spare weekends doing it.
  • Get a criminal record check – taking a stranger into your house is not easy for most homeowners. This is especially the case if the homeowner will be away for weeks, while a stranger lives in his house. If a house sitter has a criminal record check, the homeowner has at least one less worry on his mind.
  • Follow the unwritten house sitter etiquette – this includes common things like taking off your shoes in the hallway or cleaning the shower after each use. Follow the home owner’s guidelines.
  • Ask lots of questions – Ask the homeowner whether you are allowed to have guests and whether you can leave the property overnight. Is there a vehicle for you to use, do they have Internet? Ask for a contact number in case of an emergency. If you are looking after pets, ask for the veterinarian’s number.
  • Most important of all – Be the best House sitter you can be.

I hope this article gives you some insight into a new cheap way to travel and how to save on accommodation costs.

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For other ways to travel cheap, check out the following articles:

  • WWOOFing Canada – Essential Tips From A Host
  • Cheap Accommodation beyond the Hostel/Camping Dynamic
  • Couchsurfing
  • Airbnb (if you are new to Airbnb, get $35 off your first stay.
  • Work and Travel

Enjoyed this article? If you want to share some tips, please leave a comment below.

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Housesitting in Canada – How to Get Started

As Canadians, we’ve been lucky enough to visit most of Canada.

Since we also have family and friends all over the country, we always have a place to stay. It’s wonderful to have that sense of community wherever we go. Having an affordable place to hang our hats for the night doesn’t hurt either.

For visitors to our beautiful country, it’s not always so easy. Canada can be a terribly expensive place to visit. Because it’s such a big country, with relatively few people, flights are pricey. Plus, long distance bus service is limited here, especially in Western Canada with the coming closure of all Greyhound bus routes in the Western provinces.

To top that off, accommodation costs are high, especially in larger cities like Vancouver or Toronto, where most visitors start or end their visit.

Canadians in general are a pretty friendly bunch, but it’s always a challenge to feel like part of a community while staying in a hotel.

So, how can you save money traveling in Canada, and tap into the wonderful community we have here?

One fantastic way is to dip your toes into house sitting in Canada.

Housesitting in Canada

Canada is a great place to house sit. Since accommodation is pretty expensive, making house sitting a great value. Plus, there are quite a few listings, especially from homeowners with pets that need love and attention while their owners are on vacation.

How do you get started house sitting in Canada?

We’d recommend signing up for a house sitting website that connects potential sitters and homeowners.

The Nomador house sitting website is a great place to start. They’re relatively new to the house sitting world, but they’re already making a big dent, and quickly.

Nomador is becoming so incredibly popular, in part, because of their free Discovery option. The Discovery option lets you apply for your first three assignments at no charge. Homeowners can get a similar deal for their first listings.

After your first three assignments, there’s a membership fee to join. It’s the same rate for housesitters and home owners, and the website has listings all over the world.

What’s really cool about Nomador is the Stopover concept, which connects travelers and hosts around the world.

The Stopover lets home owners register to offer up a spare bedroom for members in between house sits. This lets members stay for a night or two as they travel in another country, or maybe even to fill a gap between house-sits. The culture of Nomador is based on community and the sharing economy, and we think they’ve really succeeded here!

Do I need to have references and experience to house sit in Canada?

It’s not a bad idea to have some references on hand, such as reference from a rental apartment or work.


That said, on Nomador you can’t add external references to your profile. Any references must be left by other members of the Nomador community. You can mention in your Additional Information area that you have other references and that you’re happy to send them to the homeowner.

A lot of housesitters in Canada get started building their references by doing a couple of short house sits close to home to build up their Nomador references.

Who could refuse that adorable face?

Why do people get house sitters in Canada?

Many homeowners are looking for someone to help take care of their pets while they’re away. Getting a house sitter lets dogs and cats stay in their own home and keep their familiar routine, which can be a lot less stressful than sending a dog to the kennel.

Other homeowners just want someone to take care of their property to ensure it stays in good condition while they’re away or to bring in the mail and water their plants.

How do you find a good housesit in Canada?

Patience is the key to your first good gig as a house sitter in Canada. Take some time to fill out your profile, apply to several house sitting gigs, and even consider doing a short, local, trial run house sit to build up your references.

Floating Home on Granville Island with View of Downtown Vancouver

Can you get long term house sitting in Canada?

The length of a house sit varies quite a bit, from a few days to months on end. Plenty of homeowners go away on extended trips, take a year abroad, study overseas, or take a leave of absence from work, making their home available for longer periods.

There are hundreds of house sits available on Nomador, so the best thing to do is check out the listings and see what’s available for long term sits.

Where should I get a house sit in Canada?

Canada is huge, and expensive to fly in, so getting a house to sit in the right area is important.

As Canadians, I can’t tell you how many times we’ve run across a traveler who hadn’t done their research and ended up overwhelmed by the big distances and cost to travel between cities within Canada.

Let’s put it this way – it’s a 20 hour drive (at 100+ km/h, or 62 miles/hour) with no stops from our home city of Kelowna to Charles’ family in Winnipeg. That’s less than a third of the drive coast to coast across Canada!

Because Canada is so big, and most cities are spread out, if you’re house sitting in an area outside of reliable public transit, you’ll need a car while you’re here. Distances in Canada are large, and most of our population who are outside the largest centers get around by automobile.

Note: If you’re thinking of using Uber or Lyft, realize that Uber won’t be available in the province of BC or Vancouver until the fall of 2020 and it’s no longer offered in Quebec. Lyft has just entered the Canadian market and won’t be available much outside of Toronto at the moment.

House sitting in Vancouver

Vancouver is one of Canada’s largest, and most beautiful cities. It’s perched on the Pacific Ocean, and even in the heart of the city you’re likely never more than half an hour away from nature.

Most of Vancouver’s attractions are in the city center, so housesits in areas like downtown, Kitsilano, UBC, Gastown, trendy Yaletown, and the West End are pretty desirable.

In terms of best areas to house sit in Vancouver, don’t discount suburban areas like Richmond (which has a fantastic night market) or New Westminster either. Public transit in Vancouver is reliable and clean, especially if you can score a Vancouver house sit near the SkyTrain route.

House sitting in Toronto

Toronto is Canada’s largest city, and it’s a busy, bustling place with plenty of diversity and a whole lot to see and do.

We spent a few days in Mississauga (a Toronto suburb) at a conference a few years ago, and I can say from personal experience that highway traffic can get incredibly congested and slow outside the core. The city’s actually known for having some of the worst traffic jams in the USA and Canada.

So, that said, a Toronto house sit that’s close to downtown, or on the Toronto Transit Commission subway line, would be ideal.

Good neighborhoods to house sit in Toronto’s downtown core are the Distillery District, Liberty Village, the Toronto Harbourfront, and Cabbagetown (don’t let the name scare you off).

Skyline in Toronto, Canada

House sitting in Victoria, BC

Despite being the provincial capital of British Columbia, Victoria is a small city with just about 85,000 residents. There’s no subway, so if you’re relying on public transit, you’ll need to take the bus.

Honestly, any neighborhood in Victoria is good to house sit in – don’t expect any ghettos.

As far as best neighborhoods to house sit in Victoria, Beacon Hill is one of the city’s most expensive neighborhoods, Gordon Head is middle class and suburban, while downtown is a good choice if you’re looking for lots to do and good restaurants.

While you’re in Victoria, be sure to check out the stunning Butchart Gardens.

House sitting in Calgary, Alberta

Calgary is a booming Canadian city on the footsteps of the Rocky Mountains with the gorgeous Bow River winding through the city. It’s also less than an hour drive from Banff National Park and only 30 minutes from one of our favorite Albertan mountain towns, Canmore.

The Calgary Zoo, located just outside the heart of the Calgary core, is one of the best zoo’s in North America and with warm Chinook winds, it’s not uncommon for Calgary to occasionally hit the high teens (Celsius) in the middle of winter (which isn’t so common in Canada). Calgary is also home to the Calgary Stampede, one of the largest rodeos in the world.

The CTrain runs throughout Calgary and makes it easy and fairly quick to get around. Calgary’s downtown, especially the Eau Claire district, makes a great place to stay with easy access to shops in all directions.

Some of the best neighborhoods in Calgary to house sit in relation to shops, amenities and transit outside the downtown core are Beltline, Arbour Lake, Sunnyside, Signal Hill, Westside, Bridge Line and McKenzie Town.

House sitting in Montreal, Quebec


Montreal is known for delicious food and lively entertainment. The city is as famous for poutine, smoked meat, tourtière and, oddly enough, delicious bagels as it is for cinema and culture.

Montreal is also the home to dozens of festivals, including the Montreal Jazz Festival and the always funny Just For Laughs Festival. Montreal is also the home city of Cirque Du Soleil.

Though Montreal is the second largest french city in the world (second only to Paris), most of its population is bilingual You’ll find the largest concentration of English speakers centered around the downtown core and towards the western side of the city.

There are 68 metro stations across Montreal (called the STM) and good enough transit that you can house sit just about anywhere in the city.

Some of the best neighborhoods to house sit in Montreal include Ville Marie (effectively the downtown area), Old Montreal (known locally as Vieux Montreal with its old architecture and picturesque streets), Griffintown (Irish descent and foodie paradise), Plateau-Mont-Royal (largest concentration of artists per capita in Canada) and The Village (very LGBT friendly).

Looking at house sitting in Quebec or other French Canadian areas?

Nomador has a great resource that talks about the differences (and similarities) between Anglophone (English) and Francophone (French) Canadian culture, and some special tips for applying for house sits in Quebec. Check it out here.

House sitters in Kelowna, BC

This is our home city, so there’s a lot to say. It’s a stunning small city (nudging 125,000 people), that’s perched on deep blue Okanagan lake and surrounded by mountains and wineries.

It pains me to say it, but Kelowna’s public transit is definitely lacking. There’s no subway, so you’ll need to rely on the buses, which take a fair bit of flak from residents for being less than reliable. That said, some routes are served well, especially the route from Kelowna proper to UBC Okanagan (near the airport).

Top of Knox Mountain on Apex Trail in Kelowna

If you get a house sit in Kelowna, try to get a car, or find a central location like downtown where you won’t need to commute much.

Kelowna’s roughly made of two cities, West Kelowna and Kelowna proper, which includes downtown, Rutland (which has an undeservedly bad reputation, honestly, and some great hole in the wall restaurants – try Latin Fiesta and Dosa Crepe Cafe), Lower and Upper Mission, Glenmore and several other nice neighborhoods. Kelowna is also only 30 minutes away from Big White, a huge international ski and snowboard hill.

West Kelowna is home to the stunning Mission Hill winery, and you’ll find that you’re pretty close to Okanagan Lake anywhere in the city if you love the water as much as we do. However, the real action in Kelowna, as well as most restaurants and attractions, are in the downtown area. If you’re looking to house sit in Kelowna and don’t have a vehicle, downtown is your best best.

Tip! We’ve had some terrible wildfires here during the summer months over the last few years, so make sure you chat with the homeowner about that if you’re staying on the outskirts of the city during the summer.

A few last notes on housesitting in Canada

No matter where you want to house sit in Canada, you’ll likely meet friendly and welcoming people who will make your stay memorable and enjoyable.

From the Pacific to the Atlantic, you’ll find varied cultures, unforgettable landscapes and everything from majestic mountains to wind swept prairies to rocky peaks. Each place has its own charms and its own people.

Have you ever tried home sitting in Canada? Let us know your tips! We’d love to hear from you.

Housesitting in Canada during Winter. Are we crazy.

During September last year, after traveling around the world for 18 months, we made an unusual decision—We thought it would be a good idea to spend winter in Canada. For those of you following our journey, you will know that our travels have involved following the sun. Every destination we have been to since we left Australia in March 2012 has been based on visiting when it is warm. We are sun worshippers at heart. It explains why we lived in Brisbane, Australia for 10 years before we began our nomadic life.

Maybe we had spent too much time in the sun, but we decided that it was a good idea to visit Canada for winter. You know, the time of year that Canadians flock to other parts of the world because it is too cold! Not surprisingly, it was quite easy to find house sits in Canada at that time of year. There were plenty on offer and we accepted 3 different sits—one on Vancouver Island and two near Toronto.

After a ‘relatively’ warm stay in Vancouver (average maximum temperature of 48 degrees Fahrenheit/9 degrees Celsius), we flew into Toronto and were greeted with 0 degrees Fahrenheit/-20 degrees Celsius. Take off several more degrees for windchill and, yes, it was cold. Colder than anything we had encountered before in our lives!

The good news is that the house we stayed in was very nice. This was very important as we were going to spend a fair bit of time inside. Nicole’s exact words were “We are going into hibernation.” Nicole loved the big king-size bed in the master bedroom, while I enjoyed the “man cave” basement. The house had a pool out the back (somewhere under the snow!) and was next door to a large park.

Even better than all that though were the two dogs we looked after; they were adorable. Dash was a 9-year-old Labradoodle, and Daisie was an 18-month-old Maltese. These wonderful and well-behaved dogs, with their lovely personalities, stole our hearts. They adapted to us quickly and became my shadows. They wouldn’t leave my side. If I went upstairs, they quickly followed. If I went outside, they would wait by the door until I came back.

One thing I loved was watching Dash and Daisie playing tug of war with a rope. With Dash weighing in at around 80 pounds and Daisie at about 10 pounds, it wasn’t a fair fight, but it certainly wasn’t due to lack of heart by Daisie! And like a good big brother, Dash would let her think she was in with a chance.

They were great dogs, and I couldn’t believe how much they loved running around in the snow! When it was time to go outside for a toilet break, they used to dance around the door waiting for me to open it so they could bolt into the yard. Seeing Daisie trying to bound through foot-deep snow was hilarious. She loved it!

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While we tried to keep going outside to a minimum, with any house sit there were chores to be done. And this house sit had a chore we had never done before: Shoveling snow! In the 3 weeks we were there, I was “lucky” enough to shovel snow on no less than 7 occasions. On one occasion, a snowstorm had left a foot of snow over the driveway. While I wouldn’t exactly call it fun, it wasn’t too bad as I needed some exercise after being cooped up inside all day. I have no doubt if I lived in Canada on a long-term basis I would be that guy who paid his neighbor’s kid $10 to shovel the driveway!

I also got to build my first snowman. As you can see from the picture, it was a fairly feeble effort, but I did get to cross it off my life-long bucket list!

While it was cold, we did enjoy our time house sitting in Canada. It’s something we never would have experienced if it wasn’t for the travel/house sitting lifestyle we chose. We got to experience something that we will remember for ever. But make no mistake, we are definitely looking forward to our next stop—Hawaii!

Have you been to Canada in the Winter?

House-sitting, travel and pets People, places, pets, homes and travel — be inspired!

Publié le Thu., November 17, 2020 by NmNomador

House-Sitting in Canada: A Cross-Cultural Gu >

Welcome to Nomador’s Cultural Differences & Housesitting series, an exploration of the cultural differences that affect our members’ housesitting experiences across countries and offer hands-on and practical tips to more effectively understand and communicate as a homeowner or house-sitter when crossing cultures. If you missed the first two articles in the series, be sure to read the series introduction and the first country guide, which focuses on French culture as it applies to housesitting.

This is the third post in the series, and is about the specific cultural norms and dimensions that might impact your housesitting experience in Canada. We’ll examine and compare both Anglophone and Francophone Canadian culture, specify how those similarities and differences could impact your housesitting experience, and provide tips for applying to and completing successful house-sits for Canadian homeowners and their pets.

An Introduction to Canada and its People

When it comes to culture, there truly are two versions of Canada, if not more. Take Quebec City — the largest predominantly French city in the country. Described by one travel guidebook as “archetypically French,” Canada’s quaint and cobblestoned capital of Francophone culture couldn’t be more different from the glass and skyscrapers of the thoroughly-North-American Toronto, 800km and a world away.


With these two very different groups living under one roof, you’d be forgiven for wondering: what, exactly, does it mean to be Canadian?

As it turns out, it’s a question many Canadians struggle with themselves. Almost 50 years ago, Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan famously stated, “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity.”

Today, Canadian identity is still a point of discussion, with Canada’s current Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, recently calling for Canadians to coalesce around their non-identity. From the New York Times:

«Trudeau’s most radical argument is that Canada is becoming a new kind of state, defined not by its European history but by the multiplicity of its identities from all over the world…. ‘There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada,’ he claimed. ‘There are shared values — openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first postnational state’

Since before Canada was a country, English-French relations have been a key influence on Canadian culture and identity. But when you add in contemporary Canada’s close relationship to the United States, a policy of welcoming immigrants from all over the world, and the fact that Canada only gained complete independence from Great Britain less than 35 years ago — roughly the same time Quebec’s quiet revolution produced the separatist movement — it’s clear why Canadians have a difficult time defining an overarching concept of Canadianness.

Similarities and Differences Between French and English Canada

What does all this mean for someone trying to understand what it means to be Canadian, and how to act amongst Canadians? And how could it impact a house-sitters’ experience in Canada, from application all the way through to the completion of a successful assignment?

As with our post on understanding French people and culture, we’ve drawn on recognised academic theories to help explain how Canadians’ cultural norms, expectations and habits are different between the English and French parts of the country, and what this means for house-sitting.

You can read the post from end-to-end, or skip to the section you find most interesting. These are the main points covered in this article:

4 Theories to Better Understand Canadian Culture
— Power Distance
— Individualism/Collectivism
Uncertainty Avoidance
— Monchromatic/Polychromatic
Tips for Applying to House-Sitting Assignments Across Canada
— Tips for All of Canada
— Tips for French Canada
— Tips for English Canada
Key French and English Phrases for Applying to a House-Sit in Canada
Final Thoughts

4 Theories to Understand French and English Canadians

Vancouver (Photo credit wandertooth.com )

The theories we’ll use date back to the 1950s to 1970s, when cross-cultural researchers and academics developed systems and measurements to compare national cultures from one another. Today, the findings are still applied in research both in academia and in business, and largely hold up. And while it’s easy to find exceptions, of course, it’s important to understand when cross-cultural researchers talk about culture, they’re not talking about individuals, but rather behaviours that occur among most of the people, most of the time within a cultural group.

When it comes to many of these theories, we’ll see in general, French Canada has similarities to France, and English Canada has similarities to the Anglophone countries. Making the assumption that French Canadian culture is the same as French culture, however, is similar to making the assumption that English Canadian culture is similar to that of England.

Both of the two official cultural groups in Canada are unique, with similarities and differences that could impact a house-sitters’ experience.

Power Distance
Power Distance is a measure of how well people within a culture tolerate and expect an unequal distribution of power within society. Tolerance of hierarchy, class distinctions, and overt symbols of status all relate to a culture’s overall power distance score.

With a score of 39/100 (English Canada) and 54/100 (French Canada), Canada is an egalitarian society that generally functions as a meritocracy with limited hierarchy. French Canada is generally more tolerant of hierarchy and status, and English Canada is generally more suspicious of overt status symbols and distinctions between economic and social classes.

When compared to other countries, English Canada (39) is similar to the the United States (40/100), the United Kingdom (35/100), Ireland (28/100), Australia (36/100), or New Zealand (22/100). And while French Canada’s score of 54 is less than France (68/100), where hierarchy and following a strict social protocol is the norm, it is meaningfully higher than in the Anglophone countries.

As expected by these scores, we can summarise that both English and French Canadians are relatively casual in their communication style, with French Canadians relying somewhat more on set behaviours and norms that signal hierarchy.

Practical tips for applying for a house-sit in French Canada:

  • Use the greeting Bonjour, rather than the overly-familiar Allo or Salut.
  • If available, use the member’s surname or online alias when sending a letter of introduction/application (Bonjour Alias). If it’s not available, a simple Bonjour will do.
  • When introducing yourself to a French Canadian homeowner, use the formal version of French, choosing the ‘vous’ form over the more casual ‘tu.’ In all likelihood, a French Canadian will give you the go ahead to use ‘tu’ immediately, but use ‘vous’ until they do.
    Common expressions include:
    Ne me vouvoie pas STP. Tu peux me tutoyer. / Please do not ‘vous’ me. You can ‘tu’ me.
    Peut-être qu’on peut se tutoyer / Maybe we could ‘tu’ each other from now on.
  • Err on the side of being more polite and formal when communicating with French Canadian homeowners than you would when communicating with English Canadian homeowners, but know that French Canadian culture is less formal than that of France.

Practical tips for applying for a house-sit in English Canada:

  • Note that titles and honorifics (Sir/Ma’am) are rarely used, and English Canadians are more comfortable with informal and casual communication styles, even in formal and professional situations.
  • Address the homeowner by their first name or online alias (Hello Joe / Hello Homeowner 123).
  • Feel free to be more familiar in your tone while still being polite. Canadians use please and thank you frequently.
  • Share some personal information, and be more friendly than you would in a professional job application.

Individualism/Collectivism

Individualism references whether members of a society consider the ‘I’ or the ‘we’ to be the base unit of the society, and the extent to which individuals have responsibilities to the collective wellbeing. As a general rule of thumb, western societies are more individualist ‘I’ societies, and eastern societies are more collective ‘we’ societies.

Both English and French Canada are individualist cultures, scoring 80/100 and 73/100 respectively.

When compared to Canada’s English and French-speaking sister countries — United States (91/100), United Kingdom (89/100), Ireland (70/100), Australia (90/100), New Zealand (79/100), and France (71/100) — we again see how both English Canada and French Canada somewhat mirror their language twins, but are quite close to each other as well.

In collectivist societies, we’d expect to see more effort spent on building and maintaining relationships, a focus on fitting in by following the social rules of what’s acceptable, and more indirect communication, and this is indeed one difference between the communication styles of English and French Canadians:

  • In English Canada, expect to spend a minute or two on small talk before getting down to business. In French Canada, more time is spent on relationship building at the outset and throughout a relationship, and relationships are expected to last longer.
  • English Canadians are somewhat indirect, similar to British people. While they will say what they mean, they’ll do so diplomatically. French Canadians are far less direct (although still more direct than the French), and you’ll be expected to read between the lines more.
  • If you come from a country where very direct communication is the norm (the United States or Germany, for example) try to soften your tone. It’s common for English Canadians to simply use more words to make something less direct and diplomatic. Consider:
    I don’t like this idea.
    — I can see your point of view, but have to say that I don’t completely agree, and would like to consider additional ideas.
  • Expectations of personal space are also related to individualism/collectivism, and English Canadians expect more personal space and less touching during conversation than French Canadians.

Uncertainty Avoidance

Uncertainty Avoidance is the degree to which members of a culture tolerate and attempt to minimise uncertainty in their lives, and the extent to which uncertainty causes anxiety. While it’s tempting to equate uncertainty avoidance with risk avoidance, it also relates to openness to new ideas, a willingness to try new ways of doing things, and tolerance of ideas and opinions different to one’s own.

In general, Canadians are quite open, with English Canada (48/100) being somewhat more uncertainty tolerant than French Canada (60/100), and both groups generally being quite tolerant and flexible.

  • You’re more likely to get (and be expected to give) precise details from a French Canadian than an English Canadian, who may take a more laid-back, wait-and-see approach to communication.
  • If you prefer precise details and schedules, it’s appropriate to politely ask for this information.

Whereas in France creating schedules and specifying the types and frequency of communication with the homeowner is ideal, in both English and French Canada this likely isn’t necessary. Be sure to ask the homeowner, but Canadians are relatively good at ‘going with the flow.

Monochronic vs. Polychronic Cultures
Different cultures have different conceptions of time, including its value and the best way to spend time and manage it.


People in monochronic cultures view time as linear, complete one task at a time, make strong distinctions between work time and social time, and value punctuality. Professionally, people from monochronic cultures invest time to make money.

People in polychronic cultures have a fluid view of time, and frequently integrate relationship-building with tasks. Punctuality is far less important than relationships. Professionally, people from monochronic cultures invest time to build strong relationships (which leads to making money).

Monochronism and polychronism lies on a scale and is subjective. As noted in the book Cross-Cultural Management: Culture and Management Across the World, to Germans (very monochronic), people from Quebec seem polychronic, but to Mexicans (very polychronic), people from Quebec seem monochronic.

As this applies to housesitting, members from the United States may find all Canadians to be less focused on punctuality than in the US, and members from France may find all Canadians to be less focused on relationships than in France.

  • All Canadians generally value punctuality, and it’s important to be on time for Skype appointments with a potential Canadian homeowner.
  • French Canadians are more likely to invest time in building a relationship with you than English Canadians, including mixing social conversation and ‘to the point’ discussions about the house-sitting assignment.
  • English Canadians are more likely to get directly to the point during a call, after perhaps one or two minutes of pleasantries.

Tips for Applying to House-sitting Assignments Across Canada

Now that you’re familiar with some of the key similarities and differences between French and English Canadian culture, consider these tips when preparing your next house-sitting application.

Tips for All of Canada:

  • Don’t assume an English Canadian speaks French, or a French Canadian speaks English. The Canadian educational system is managed by the provinces (not the federal government), and not all Canadians learn the other language. In western Canada, you may be more likely to find people who speak Asian languages than French.
  • If you’re a non-smoker, mention this outright in your application. Smoking cigarettes is much less tolerated in Canada than it is in many European countries, and is generally frowned upon by many Canadians. This includes e-cigarettes, which are subject to similar controls as regular cigarettes.
  • Many Canadians treat pets as a member of their own family, and are emotionally invested in their pets’ well-being. Show you care by mentioning the pets by name, asking questions about the pets needs and personalities, and explaining why you love caring for pets.

Tips for English-Speakers Applying for a House-Sit in French Canada:

  • Begin your message in French, and then ask if the homeowner speaks English. While Nomador is a bilingual platform, many French Canadians don’t speak English. See the list of key French Canadian phrases for help.
  • Use formal French, beginning your message with Bonjour, and using the ‘vous’ form of French until you’re asked to use ‘tu.’
  • Start your message with general pleasantries before explaining your house-sitting experience and key information.
  • Explain why you’re interested in visiting Canada.
  • Keep your communication relatively formal. Only include the kind of information you’d likely share in a professional job interview, and use a profile photo that isn’t overly casual.

Tips for French-Speakers Applying for a House-Sit in English Canada:

  • Begin your message in English, and then ask if the homeowner speaks French. While Nomador is a bilingual platform, many English Canadians don’t speak French. See the list of key English phrases for help.
  • Don’t use overly formal language. Beginning your message with Hello First Name or Dear First Name is the norm.
  • Start your message with a general pleasantry before explaining your house-sitting experience and key information.
  • Explain why you’re interested in visiting Canada.
  • Keep your communication polite but friendly. Feel free to share personal information, such as your blog or work, or details about your family or life.

Key French Canadian Phrases for Applying to a House-Sit in French Canada

  • Enchanté(e) de vous rencontrer / It is a pleasure to meet you
  • Je m’appelle (your first name AND your last name), et je suis (your nationality)/ My name is [so and so], and I am [nationality].
  • Je vous écris en réponse à l’annonce parue sur Nomador. / I am writing in response to your advertisement posted on Nomador.
  • Je suis désolé, je ne parle pas français. Peut-être parlez-vous anglais ? / I am sorry I do not speak French. Do you speak English?
  • N’hésitez pas à me contacter si vous avez d’autres questions. / Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
  • Cordialement vôtre/ Best Regards OR Au plaisir d’entendre de vos nouvelles / I hope to hear from you soon.

  • Your First and Last Name (Sincerely, Name).
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Key English Phrases for Applying to a House-Sit in English Canada

  • I hope this note finds you well, and you’re enjoying a lovely [autumn] in [city].
  • I am writing to express interest in caring for your [pet] and home this [month].
  • I am sorry I do not speak English. Do you speak French? / Je suis désolé, je ne parle pas anglais. Peut-être parlez-vous français?
  • I’d be happy to speak with you about this over a Skype call if you’d like.
  • Thank you for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.
  • Sign your first name.

Final Thoughts

As we noted in the first guide about France, it’s difficult to avoid generalising cultures and groups when speaking about cultural differences, especially given the fact that Canada is one of the most culturally-diverse countries in the world.

In this post, we’ve tried to outline the concepts and guidelines that are generally accepted across Canada, but individual difference, age, and personal preference will certainly impact homeowner expectations.

And, of course, if you try these techniques yourself, we would love to hear how it goes in the comments!

A note about sources

This guide was written with the input of the Nomador team, and drawing upon my education in Intercultural Communications. However, I also consulted the following sources:

House Sitting: Travel Cheap, Stay For Free

House Sitting, what a great way to travel and see Canada on a budget. This is an excellent alternative to backpacker places and hotels. Basically, you take care of someone’s property in exchange for free accommodation.

The only cost to you is the joining fee to one of the many house sitting sites online. The fee ranges anywhere from $25 to $150 per year.

Rather than following the tourist track, you will get to know locals and their lifestyle and live in places you may have never been able to afford otherwise. The house sitting duties often include looking after pets, maintaining a garden, doing some yard work and keeping the place tidy. If you opt for ranch sitting, then the duties extend to looking after horses and livestock.

I have never done house sitting but had ranch sitters looking after my ranch many times when I was away. So I definitely know what it is all about.

House sitting can become your way of travel. The money you save on accommodation is significant. On top of that, you get to enjoy many amazing travel experiences which would have never been possible otherwise.

Is House Sitting For You?

House sitting might not be a good fit if you feel rushed and only have a limited time available and you want to see as much of the country as possible. On the other hand, if you are not in a rush and prefer to travel cheap and longer, house sitting could be an excellent choice for you. Instead of just travelling miles, you stay put for a while and make yourself useful.

Jobs range from just a weekend to a few months. This means that even if you are a short time traveller, you still can fit the experience into your travel itinerary. Lots of different house sitting jobs are available.

This is also a good option for families, needing a bigger place to stay. It gives you the opportunity to travel on a low budget and the whole family can get involved with the house sitting tasks and get to know a new community. It is a give and take deal. You get a free place to stay and the homeowner gets a valuable service in return.

Who Qualifies For House Sitting

Being independent with some experience under the belt is a good start. Try house sitting for friends or family before you leave home to see whether this type of travel suits you. Having at least one good reference will give you a better chance of being accepted when you apply. References make it easier to convince a stranger in another country that you can be trusted and can do the job.

A house sitting job has to be taken seriously. In exchange for free accommodation, you are expected to take care of someone’s place and possessions, and maybe their furry animals.

House Sitting Websites

There are several good house sitting websites out there to match homeowners with house sitters. All of them require a membership fee. Now you will probably ask which site is the best. If the best is chosen by the success rate, then the best house sitting site has to be TrustedHousesitters. Check out the others as well and see what you think.

Thankfully there are so many websites to choose from. One will become your favourite as soon as you secure your first assignment.

TrustedHousesitters

TrustedHousesitters.com is the world’s largest and fastest growing house and pet sitting website. The website has won many awards and offers the most choices for house sitters. When listening to the amazing stories told by travellers about their incredible TrustedHousesitters experiences, it doesn’t come as a surprise that the website is on top of the list. TrustedHousesitters is also my choice to sign up as a homeowner looking for ranch sitters.

TrustedHousesitters offers thousands of house sitting opportunities worldwide.

Membership fee: $96 Annual

MindMyHouse.com

This is a well-made website and offers a good number of house-sits.

The biggest draw for MindMyHouse is the cheap yearly membership. It’s one of the cheapest amongst the international sites.

Membership fee: $20 Annual

HouseCarers

HouseCarers is another thriving site with a g cheap fee and high quantity of assignments. Still, with around 300 active assignments per month, they are quite a bit behind TrustedHousesitters who has a monthly total of 1000+ available sits.

Membership fee: $50 Annual

Nomador

Nomador is the newest addition to the house sitting landscape and I love their website structure. It is easy to navigate and has an easy to use a search engine.

Membership fee: $89 Annual

Tips On How To Get Started

  • Write a great profile – First impressions count and a well-written profile can quickly move you to the top of the homeowner’s list of sitters applications to reply to.
  • Get these references – When sending reference requests, also include references from past employers and friends. Having more references will give you a better chance to get the house sitting job you applied for.
  • House sit and pet sit before you leave home – This is very important to get experience. House sit for friends or family, or find a house sitting job via house sitting sites and spend some spare weekends doing it.
  • Get a criminal record check – taking a stranger into your house is not easy for most homeowners. This is especially the case if the homeowner will be away for weeks, while a stranger lives in his house. If a house sitter has a criminal record check, the homeowner has at least one less worry on his mind.
  • Follow the unwritten house sitter etiquette – this includes common things like taking off your shoes in the hallway or cleaning the shower after each use. Follow the home owner’s guidelines.
  • Ask lots of questions – Ask the homeowner whether you are allowed to have guests and whether you can leave the property overnight. Is there a vehicle for you to use, do they have Internet? Ask for a contact number in case of an emergency. If you are looking after pets, ask for the veterinarian’s number.
  • Most important of all – Be the best House sitter you can be.

I hope this article gives you some insight into a new cheap way to travel and how to save on accommodation costs.

For other ways to travel cheap, check out the following articles:

  • WWOOFing Canada – Essential Tips From A Host
  • Cheap Accommodation beyond the Hostel/Camping Dynamic
  • Couchsurfing
  • Airbnb (if you are new to Airbnb, get $35 off your first stay.
  • Work and Travel

Enjoyed this article? If you want to share some tips, please leave a comment below.

8 Trusted Ways to Get House Sitting Jobs

If you are someone who loves to side hustle while traveling, you must have heard about house sitting jobs.

You can’t miss them if earning on the side is something you love doing while being a travel junkie.

Over the last few years, house sitting has seen significant growth as a side job. It’s interesting to note that even full-time job holders are turning to house sitting for extra income or if they plan to travel (to cut costs).

When it comes to travel, whether it is traveling with kids or solo travel, the accommodation could take the fun out of your experience. Of all the jobs you can do while traveling, house sitting is a great way to satisfy your travel bug if you lack the funds to get a place to stay.


Learn more about house sitting jobs


What exactly are house sitting jobs?

House sitting is taking care of a house while its owner is away for a certain period of time. By taking care of the house, I mean general cleaning, gardening, taking care of pets if there are any, and other household chores. It’s very much like how you treat your own place.

House sitting jobs are abundant in countries like the US, Canada, Australia, the UK, and many other places.

You also need to remember that typically house sitting jobs are for more extended periods from one to six months. During this period, you are supposed to be taking care of the house and pets. You can always choose between short-term and long-term stays.

Related:

Who can do house sitting jobs?

Though there are no particular requirements for house sitting, I have noticed in some forums that families with young children don’t get many opportunities. Homeowners prefer people who are capable of taking care of their homes while they are gone. Much better if you have some experience doing this gig.

How much can you earn with house sitting?

How much you can make as a house sitter depends on many factors like,

  • The location of the house
  • The responsibilities
  • The duration of house sitting

So it varies widely depending on the duration and length of your stay.

House sitting doesn’t always involve getting paid. Some house sitters don’t charge at all. This is the case when someone is visiting a new place and wants accommodation. They do house sitting gigs in exchange for rent and food.

Where to find house sitting jobs?

There are many places to find house sitting jobs like

TrustedHousesitters – This website is by far the biggest resource for house sitting gigs, and it charges a fee of $119 to register as a house sitter on its website. It’s one of the sites that does not ask for a background check for house sitters. This website has house sitting opportunities in the US, Europe, UK, and Canada. It’s a good place to start if you just want to sign up for one website, considering that it has a large number of houses listed.

HouseCarers – This website has house sitting opportunities in the US and Australia. The fee for registering as a house sitter on Housecarers.com is $50 per year. You need to keep in mind that this website only works on the premise that you can do house sitting in exchange for free accommodation, so there is no pay involved. If there are additional duties, then a fee is decided between the house sitter and house owner.

Nomador – The fee to become a registered member of this website is $89 per year. It has house sitting gigs in France and other French-speaking countries exclusively. It’s also expanding down under in Australia now. It has a “Discovery” option where you can create your house sitter profile and send up to three applications without paying the full fees.

MindMyHouse – This website charges $20 per year for creating your house sitter profile. It has a relatively low number of houses listed when compared to the above sites. MindMyHouse is an excellent place to get started if you are new to house sitting given the low fees.

HouseSitMatch.com – The charges to sign up are around $49 to $79 per year for this website. It advertises house sitting opportunities in the UK, Australia, France, and Spain for now. It also has a lot of pet sitting opportunities in these countries, if you are a pet lover.

LuxuryHouseSitting.com – This website charges $25 per year to create your house sitter profile. It has house sitting gigs in many countries like Australia, the UK, the US, Africa, Thailand, and many more. It also has a 60-day refund policy if you are not happy with their service.

House Sitters America – This website has a fee of $30 per year to become a house sitter on its platform. It only caters to US states.

House Sitters Canada – This is a relatively new startup in the house sitting market. It only lists houses in Canada. For a limited time, it has a two year free membership for house sitters (which is excellent news if you want to house sit in Canada).

How to get started as a house sitter?

Register on the above websites

If you want to land house sitting gigs, then sign up for a bunch of house sitting websites. I know they are expensive, but if you can grab a good number of house sitting jobs, then you will be earning more than the membership fees for all these websites.
If your mission is to travel to new places, then sign up for a website like TrustedHouseSitters.com, which has a big list of houses and covers many countries.

Create a stellar profile

All these websites are like matchmaking sites. The better your profile is, the better your chances are of getting the house sitting job. Being as descriptive as you can be in your profile about your past house sitting jobs, highlighting your soft skills like good with pets or excellent gardening skills, etc. can make a positive impact on the house owner.

To make it more personalized, add good photographs to your profile. You can also provide as many references as possible, which can increase the trust factor, helping you to land more jobs.

Apply and communicate

Once you find the right house, apply promptly. Be quick in answering questions and ask any questions you have. It’s always good to know what the rules are and the expectations of the house owners before you jump in.

Things to remember before you start house sitting

Getting a background check organized in advance will you a better chance of getting more house sitting jobs as most of these websites ask for background checks.

Many of these websites have house sitter terms and conditions, but most of the time, house owners and house sitters make their own agreements, which is more convenient.

Always check the requirements and do your research before you agree to any house sitting gigs. Personal safety is most important if you are going to live in a new place for a more extended period.

There are short-term stays and long-term stays, and both of them have different requirements, so check them before you apply.

Pros and cons of house sitting

Pros

House sitting jobs can save you a lot of rent if you are in a new place and want to test the waters before renting.

It is a great way to cut down costs if you are a frequent traveler as major tourist destinations like Europe have super hefty hotel charges.

House sitting is a flexible way to earn extra money on the side if you want a change of place.

Cons

There is an initial investment to sign up for all these websites, which might be hard if you are on a tight budget.

You might have to take care of expenses like gas, electricity, and others as some of the owners don’t pay for those.

If you are not a pet lover, taking care of pets can be a little harder (most of these house sitting gigs come with pets)

House sitting is great for many reasons like cutting down costs, saving rent, living in a new place, etc. It can put money back in your pocket if you are a frequent traveler with no expenses for accommodation at all.

If you are keen to experiment with this new gig then sign up for the above websites and become a house sitter.

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