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Living in Calgary

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If you’re thinking about living in Calgary or are a newcomer to Calgary, this guide will help you navigate life in your new surroundings.

What is it like living in Calgary? Where is Calgary in Canada? How does the cost of living in Calgary compare with other cities? We have compiled answers to some of the most pressing questions you might have about Calgary.

Where is Calgary in Canada?

Calgary is the largest city in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Alberta borders the United States, with the province of British Columbia to the west, Saskatchewan to the east and the Northwest Territories to the north. Calgary sits within the prairies just east of the Rocky Mountains, where the Bow and Elbow rivers meet.

From here, in Alberta’s Grassland region, the prairies begin rolling east through central Canada. Calgary is frequently referred to as the gateway to the Rocky Mountains, providing a dramatic backdrop to the city. World famous skiing, and the town of Banff, are only a 90-minute drive to the west.

About Calgary

There are around 1.3 million people living in Calgary, making it the third-largest municipality and fourth -largest metropolitan area in Canada. According to the 2020 Census, Calgary experienced the biggest population growth of any metropolitan area in Canada since 2011, and its residents also have the youngest average age of any major Canadian city.

Calgary is larger than Edmonton, the province’s capital situated approximately two and a half hours to the north by car. Calgary is the major urban centre for the entire southern half of the province of Alberta. It is surrounded by an area of profound beauty, with an unspoiled, resource-rich natural environment.

Economic activity in Calgary is heavily focused on the petroleum industry, agriculture, and tourism. Alberta has the lion’s share of Canada’s oil industry. Its reserves, in the form of oil sands, are estimated to be second only to Saudi Arabia’s. Most petroleum companies in Canada have their headquarters based in Calgary, contributing to making Calgary one of Canada’s wealthiest cities. The economic reliance on this industry typically results in ‘boom’ and ‘bust’ cycles, and current low oil prices mean that Calgary is in the midst of economic recovery. Calgary’s unemployment rate is currently higher than many other Canadian cities as a result.

In 1988, Calgary became the first Canadian city to host the Winter Olympic Games. These games continue to be a benchmark for future host countries on how to run a successful Olympics. The Calgary Olympics pioneered the use of community volunteers — something Canadians pride themselves on.

Calgary continues to be known for its ‘can-do’ attitude and business-friendly environment.

With its focus on the oil industry and proud ‘Cowboy’ traditions, you’ll often hear Alberta referred to as the ‘Texas’ of Canada. By extension, Calgary is often called ‘Cowtown’ and the Calgary Stampede, which lasts 10 days every July, is known as the “Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth.”

The Stampede is a rodeo where cowboys from different places gather to showcase their talents.

And it’s not just for those living in Calgary — it’s a major tourist attraction too. Hotels and flights get very busy and expensive during this time, so book early. Most of downtown Calgary shuts down during the Stampede to join in the festivities. Calgary is also known as “Heart of the new West.”

For more, read our 10 things to do in Calgary guide.

Calgary weather

Calgary is a mountain-high city at 1,048 metres above sea level. The climate is dry, with generally low levels of humidity.

Sitting on the prairies, Calgary gets the most sun of any of Canada’s major cities. Summers can be warm and dry, with temperatures capable of reaching 30°C. More often than not it is mild, especially when compared with most of Canada. Even when it’s cold, it’s usually sunny. This can make living in Calgary in an attractive prospect.

Weather in Calgary is characterized by four distinct seasons. It almost always cools off comfortably at night, when frost can occur at any time of the year.

Winter is quite pleasant by Canadian standards, with temperatures staying below -10°C for only a few weeks of the year. Winter is made all the more pleasant by the city’s close proximity to the Rockies. There are so many great ski resorts to choose from, so don’t be afraid to embrace the winter snow.

The most distinctive characteristic of a Calgary winter is the Chinook. This is a warm wind from the Pacific Ocean that can raise the temperature by as much as 15 degrees in a few hours.

When the dark Chinook arch appears in the western sky, the warm wind is about to blow in. One day you might be wearing your winter jacket, the next, a short-sleeved shirt and shorts.

Running enthusiasts have been known to boast that they have run in shorts on at least one day in every month of the year, even in the depths of winter.

May is typically a windy month, while June has above average rainfall. July and August are the warmest months. September and October often enjoy “Indian summer” conditions.

Calgary receives low amounts of annual rainfall, with most of its annual precipitation coming in the form of snow during the winter months.

Depending on the year and the frequency of the warm Chinook winds, winter snowfall events may only remain visible for a few days. If you were to visit Calgary, August is known to be the most pleasant month in terms of weather. And if you plan on living in Calgary year-round, make sure your wardrobe is fit for all seasons.

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Culture in Calgary

Around one-in-three people living in Calgary were born outside Canada , so the city is very diverse. Calgary is ethnically diverse, with a population that is made up of many immigrants from outside Canada, predominantly Filipino, Indian and Chinese. Just over one-third of the population is a visible minority.

In recent years, Canadians from other provinces have migrated in large numbers because of the strong economy.

Calgary is also the first choice of “second movers”. These are people who immigrated to Canada, settled, and decided to relocate again.

Given that many Calgarians are not from Calgary, the ones that are will always make a point to mention it — “born and raised here!”

Calgary has a world class selection of theatres and music venues, including:
• Jack Singer Concert Hall.
• Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra.
• Theatre Calgary.
• Alberta Theatre Projects.
• Glenbow museum, which showcases historical artifacts from Calgary’s and Alberta’s past, as well as First Nations arts, artifacts, and other art exhibits.

Calgary is also extremely proud of its tradition in country music, and you’re likely to hear plenty of it if you decide to call this city home. Many of Calgary’s radio stations are dedicated solely to this genre, including Wild 953 and Country 105.

You’ll find the normal offering of recreational sports here in Calgary, if you want to keep fit with some soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, etc. The city’s professional sports scene is not as vibrant as many other cities, however. The Calgary Flames, the city’s National Hockey League (NHL) franchise, are well followed and play at the iconic Scotiabank Saddledome downtown. You also have the Calgary Stampeders to cheer on the football (CFL) field throughout the summer and autumn, but there are no NBA, MLB, or MLS franchises in the city.

Cost of living in Calgary


This booming city has plenty of wealth, but living costs are lower than in its coastal neighbour Vancouver.

This is due in part to Alberta having no sales tax and a lower price of gasoline and natural gas. The cost of living in Calgary is high relative to smaller towns around Alberta, but quite reasonable compared with most Canadian cities.

Calgary’s recovery from its most recent economic recession has kept house prices and rent at competitive levels, which is great news for newcomers to Calgary. There is a good supply of rental properties, most of which are only available unfurnished. Renting a standard one-bed apartment will set you back around $1,000 per month, while two-bed versions cost around $300-400 more.

Learn more about the cost of living in Calgary.

Transit in Calgary

Calgary is served by buses and light rail transit (the C-Train). There is no underground rail system, and you’ll quickly find that the public transport offering isn’t as comprehensive as many other Canadian cities. The C-Train can prove useful, but note that living in Calgary can be tough without access to a vehicle. For detailed and concise info on transport in Calgary, visit our dedicated page .

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Dining out in Calgary

A special thank you to Sharon Whelton and Michael Brophy for their help with this section.

Calgary has a huge variety of cafes, restaurants and pubs. All of them have an impressive offering in terms of dining out.

Alberta is famed for it’s ‘Berta Beef’, so there are lots of good steak options across the city, but there’s also a great variety of fine dining at reasonable pricing in Calgary. Most restaurants here have daily specials that are particularly good value if you want to treat yourself any day of the week.

Here is a list of 10 places that are each unique and have great cuisine, as well as providing a variety of atmospheres. They’re a treat for anyone living in Calgary.

Many of the options listed below can be found throughout Calgary, making it a great excuse to explore the city, but 17 th Avenue is typically the best place to go in Calgary, as many of the best pubs and restaurants are situated here.

Calgary draws in the tastes of the world, so you’re very likely to find great meals here that hark back to your homeland. This beautiful Nepalese restaurant is located in a popular South-West residential hotspot on 17th Avenue. Westbrook’s C-Train station is only a few minutes walk away too, and it’s well worth a visit wherever in the city you’re coming from, or if you’re in Calgary from out of town.

The interior is beautifully decorated, with stunning canvas paintings of traditional Himalayan scenes dotted across the walls. It’s a comfortable dining experience, with only gentle musical tones supplementing the wonderful food on the tables.

The menu includes plenty of curry and noodle dishes, most of which are available in all levels of spiciness — beware that medium would be hot enough for most foodie daredevils! The Vegetable Mo:Mo is a light, delicate, exquisite starter, which can be shared with others while waiting for the sizeable main courses. The Himalayan main dish is a mild, creamy, and tangy option that’s well worth sampling, but I’d recommend going for the Chau Chau noodles with shrimp if you’re looking for an added spicy kick.

The menu caters excellently for vegetarians, and there’s also a great variety of gluten free options.

This delightful British pub is located on 17 th Ave SW, barely a five-minute drive from the busier nightlife spots on this popular street. It’s a great place to start off the evening, with delicious pub grub at a reasonable price.

It’s a hub for sports fans too, with lots of televisions featuring the night’s hockey, basketball, football, and soccer action. There are great value food and drink specials any day of the week, so keep it in mind if you want to treat yourself on a low budget.

Chill out there with a ‘Wing Wednesday’ special, where each delicious piece of chicken costs just 35c each (there’s a great selection of sauces and toppings available too).

Burger fans will also be kept happy, and I’d recommend going for the eye-catching ‘Fat Bastard’ if you’re stomach is rumbling. This bulging feast includes an egg and delicious onion ring inside two tasty burger buns.

Stephen’s Avenue is a busy shopping avenue in downtown Calgary, but it’s also home to plenty of interesting nightlife and dining. The Warehouse might not blow your socks off with stunning food, but it’s a great place to visit if you’re fed up of cooking at home and want a meal at a low, low price.

You might have come across this chain elsewhere in Canada, but this is the only location in the entirety of Alberta. All items on the food menu are a staggering $5.95, whether it’s a poutine, burger, or tray of nachos. It’s hard to go wrong with any menu choice at that price, but I’d recommend trying the delicious Chaing-Mai Bowl if you’re on the look for something a bit healthier. This noodle dish contains lots of chunky vegetables and Asian greens.

Its downtown location means that it usually gets quite busy in the evenings, giving it a lively, youthful atmosphere. The music playlist coming through the speakers plays hit after hit, and there’s a great drinks menu available too. Go for the Tennessee Lemonade for a tangy whiskey hit to wash down your meal!

Oriental Phoenix is a fantastic Vietnamese restaurant. Conveniently, they have two locations – one in downtown Calgary (Suite 105-401 9 Ave SW), and another close to Chinook C-Train station (104 58 Ave SE).

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Both are great restaurants, but from a personal perspective, I prefer the SE location purely for its atmosphere. There is a great vibe, and their staff are friendly and helpful.

Prices are very competitive, depending on what you order. I tend to go for the Papaya Salad or spring rolls to start with, and their noodle soups are fabulous. I would highly recommend the marinated chicken and grilled marinated pork noodle soup. It’s served with rice noodles, and served with a chicken base broth.

Original Joe’s has restaurants dotted across the city, and it’s a very popular place for good food and a drink. On a Friday evening, it’s one of the best places to be with a lively atmosphere and great service.

OJ’s (as it’s more commonly referred to) has quite the choice on their menu, from burgers to flatbreads and noodle bowls to entrees. They have plenty of tasty specials each day on both food and drinks, making it a great option for people of all budgets.

One of my personal favourites is The Original burger, which comes with two sides. Again, prices here are very competitive.

Notable is just a phenomenal restaurant. Situated in the NW near Bowness, this is a little far out for many, but I promise you it’s worth the journey.

It is undoubtedly one of my favourite restaurants in Calgary, but I warn you – it is expensive.

Highly recommended dishes to order include the Thai marinated Notable chicken wings, or the crispy potato rolls to start with.

For mains, the grilled Alberta bison is amazing; I couldn’t possibly recommend it more. The free-range half chicken is also delicious, as well as their steaks.

For the desserts, the warm dark chocolate pudding is sublime, as is the dulce de leche crème brulee. What also impressed me is that the restaurant has separate lunch and dinner menus for gluten-free diners.

Situated in Brentwood and on 17 th Avenue, this Irish pub chain is a lovely spot for a bite to eat and a relaxing evening with some friends. You’ll find more intimate and exciting Irish pub atmospheres elsewhere, but this is a comfortable spot with lots of games to keep you occupied too. Check out the shuffleboard table at the 17 th Avenue location for a unique pub game experience. A few hours could quickly pass before you realise where the time went.

As with many other pubs in Calgary, Jameson’s run daily specials on both drinks and food. Also, if you mention any dietary requests to the server, they check with the chef to see what can be prepared for you, which is great. If you’re out in a group of 3-4 meat eaters then you should consider sharing the Party Platter, which includes a mouthwatering mix of ribs, sausage, calamari, fried pickles, chicken skewers and plenty of dips. It says it’s suitable for up to six people, but you might find yourself slightly hungry if it’s spread that thin.

There can be live music playing too from time to time, but it does get quite loud later in the evening, so if you want to go for a chat with friends, then earlier in the day or late afternoon would be the best time. They also show a wide variety of sports.

Located on 17 th Avenue SW, Una Pizza and Wine is one of the best pizzerias in Calgary. It’s extremely popular among those living in Calgary, so it’s important to note that Una operates on a first come, first serve basis. If you are unable to get a table right away, a server will take your contact details and call you closer to the time of when a table becomes available. It also provides pickup and delivery services, if you want to enjoy the meal in the comfort of your own home.

Their opening hours are 11.30 a.m. – 1 a.m. seven days a week, with the late closing time undoubtedly proving to be a practical option for late-night workers. Their pizzas are delicious, and their wine selection is hugely impressive.

Moxie’s Grill and Bar is another casual dining option for those wanting some nice food and a drink with friendly servers. Moxie’s restaurants can be found in various locations throughout Calgary, although I’ve only frequented the restaurant downtown, which is conveniently close to a number of central C-train stops.

Calgary’s summer may be relatively brief, but the locals here take good advantage of it. When the temperature rises, many restaurants introduce outdoor seating, and this is one restaurant well worth checking out when you can saunter around in a t-shirt. Give the delicious classic beef burger a go, while the chicken tenders and the penne toscana are also great for appeasing the taste buds.

Prices in Moxie’s are competitive, and they always have specials each day.

Joey’s offers some great food at competitive prices, and their multiple locations serve many of Calgary’s most popular neighbourhoods.


It’s an enjoyable atmosphere, but beware about that things can get pretty busy there at weekends, so try and reserve ahead if you have your heart set on trying out their menu.

The meals in Joey’s have always been enjoyable, and there’s always an impressive selection of foods on the menu. Go for the roast chicken and BBQ ribs, while I would also have to recommend the lettuce wraps to start, as well as the delightful calamari fritti.

Calgary nightlife

For the most part, it seems that the majority of those living in Calgary prefer pubs over nightclubs. The most popular pubs in town include Jameson’s on 17 th Ave, the Rose and Crown, the Trap and Gill, Ceili’s, and St James Corner. These pubs also serve food until late.

If you fancy a traditional Irish music session, Sundays at the Oak Tree are the perfect time and place. There’s always a great atmosphere upstairs, where conversation is encouraged, helped by a scarcity of televisions.

In terms of other options, Ranchman’s, Cowboy’s, and The Roadhouse are always popular choices. Cowboy’s is probably the most popular of the three. With its large dance floor, DJ, live bands and country dance lessons, the venue is always extremely busy, particularly on the weekends.

Ranchman’s isn’t far behind though, as it’s known as the “Official Hospitality Location of The Canadian Professional Rodeo Association.” Ranchman’s is almost always packed on a Saturday night, and their policy is to ask for >Remember the fight scene from the iconic movie ‘Cool Runnings’? That was filmed at Ranchman’s. It’s a unique nightlife experience, with lots of line dancing and a mechanical bull to also keep you occupied.

However, if it’s a slightly quieter night that you are looking for, it may be best to avoid the above suggestions and stick to a pub.

Calgary positives & negatives

Positives of Living in Calgary

  • Low taxes. Taxes in Canada include both a Provincial Sales Tax (PST) and a general Goods and Service Tax (GST). Alberta res >Calgary was named North America’s most livable city in 2020.
  • House prices and rent prices competitive, with plenty of accommodation supply.
  • Salaries in Calgary are typically above the Canadian average.
  • It’s clean and beautiful. with a modern, attractive downtown, a good-sized meandering river, and the Rocky Mountain backdrop.
  • The Rockies are easily accessible by car from Calgary, with world-class skiing in the winter and incredible vistas in the summer.
  • Clean air.
  • One of the sunniest climates in Canada and low rainfall.
  • Chinook winds bringing mild days in winter.
  • Fantastic winter sports and Canada Olympic Park.
  • Friendly people.
  • It’s easy to “get away from it all” into a huge province with a small population.
  • Recreational opportunities abound.

Negatives of living in Calgary

  • Economic reliance on the oil industry leads to ‘boom’ and ‘bust’ cycles, and the unemployment rate is currently higher than many other Canadian cities.
  • It can be difficult to get around Calgary if you don’t have a car.
  • The long, cold winter, though Chinook winds can bring warm spells for a day or two, and occasionally longer.
  • The rapid thaw and slush when the warm Chinook wind blows in winter. Roads get messy.
  • The short summer. Calgary’s summers can be considered short, with only two months (July and August) of hot weather, though September and October are often generally warm and pleasant.
  • Canada in general, and Western Canada in particular, is relatively young and does not have the centuries of history and civilization of many other countries. However, some may regard this as a positive.

Special thanks to the following people for making the Calgary section of Moving2Canada possible: Paddy Slater, Colin Smyth, Enda McNulty, Andy Irvine, Sharon Whelton, Michael Brophy and Ivan Hearty. Your assistance is truly appreciated.

Want more help for living in Calgary?

Moving2Canada is here to help all those living in Calgary.

A special thank you to Michael Brophy for his help with updating this article.

What Is The Cost Of Living In Canada?

Canada is one of the most popular destinations for students and immigrants. What is the average cost of living in Canada? Did you know that renting a furnished apartment in an expensive residential area could cost around 2,500 Canadian dollars?

A meal at a fast food chain like Mc Donald’s or Subway would cost you somewhere around 10-15 CAD.

In this article, we discuss the average cost of living in Canada in terms of:

  • Accommodation
  • Utility charges
  • Food and grocery
  • Healthcare fee
  • Entertainment
  • Public transportation

Ontario, Canada Image Courtesy James Wheeler

Canada – What Attracts Immigrants To Canada

Before we discuss the average monthly cost of living in Canada, let us know a bit about the country. The country is known for its beautiful geographical features and acceptance of diversity. This nation also happens to be one of the most multicultural countries in the world.

The landscape is varied in nature with beautiful and serene lakes and rivers, glorious mountains, valleys covered in forests and rolling hills and plains. It indeed is a perfect destination for anyone who wants to live in a great country.

Besides, this nation is well known for its government that is socially progressive, universal health care programmes, high quality of life, and for its kind and friendly people.

No wonder this country happens to be one of the top destinations in the world that people consider migrating to in spite of the extremely cold temperatures in the winters.

If you are planning to move to Canada one of the first things to consider is how much it will cost you to move to that place and the cost of living in Canada. You could be moving to Canada as a student or an employee.

You could also be moving there as a permanent resident. Whatever your reason to migrate to Canada, you need to have a clear understanding of the cost of living in this nation.

Let’s take a look at how much it would cost a person to live in Canada.

Cost Of Living In Canada – The Most Expensive Cities

Given below is the list of the most expensive cities to live in Canada.

  • Toronto in Ontario
  • Vancouver in British Columbia
  • Victoria in British Columbia
  • Hamilton-Burlington in Ontario
  • Calgary in Alberta

Cost Of Living In Canada – The Cheapest Places

When you choose to live in a place outside the major cities of Canada you can cut down on your cost of living. Some of the cheapest places to live in Canada are given below.

  • Abbotsford in British Columbia
  • St. Catherine’s in Ontario
  • Moncton in New Brunswick
  • The province of Quebec (Any place can be chosen)

Cost Of Living In Canada – Rent And Housing

Just like any other country the residential costs and rent happen to be the major portion of the cost of living in Canada. Toronto in Ontario and Vancouver in British Columbia are the most popular cities in Canada chosen by people to migrate.

Hence, these two remain the most expensive of all cities in Canada when it comes to making your place of residence. Renting a furnished apartment in an expensive residential area could come up to at least 2,500 Canadian dollars.

Choosing to live in cities like Ottawa, Montreal or Calgary could bring down the costs of housing and rent slightly. The rent could come around 2,000 Canadian dollars for a furnished apartment in these places. You could also enjoy a high-quality life in these cities just like you would do in Vancouver.

If you are looking for a much quieter and peaceful life you could skip the cities for a smaller town or a remote area. The housing costs and rent in such places are much cheaper than what you pay in the cities.


You could find a one-roomed furnished apartment for less than 1,000 Canadian dollars. Let’s take a look at the rental charges for a house in some of the major places in Canada for 2020.

City Rent — 1 Bedroom Houses Rent — 2 Bedroom Houses
Vancouver 2,100 3,200
Toronto 2,300 2,900
Montreal 1,500 1,800
Ottawa 1,300 1,550
Victoria 1,400 1,750
Burnaby 1,600 2,250
Calgary 1,100 1,350

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Living In Canada Utility Charges

Besides rental charges a person living in Canada has to pay a monthly charge for utilities like electricity, water, heating, and gas. On average, a person living in Canada pays around 90-95 CAD (Canadian Dollars) per month as utility charges.

If you are single or a student you can save on housing charges by sharing a flat. Students can also consider applying for a University accommodation to cut down housing charges.

City Utility Charges
Vancouver 116
Toronto 126
Montreal 117
Ottawa 132
Victoria 138
Burnaby 110
Calgary 193

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Food And Groceries In Canada

Even though the cost of groceries and food in Canada is not considered too expensive the prices could be slightly higher than the cost of food in countries like the USA.

This is because a major portion of the food and groceries that you get in Canada are imported due to the extremely cold weather in the country. However, if you compare the prices to many of the European nations the cost of food is cheaper in Canada.

Going out for a meal or dinner would be expensive in cities like Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal. It is much cheaper when you dine at a hotel in a remote town or small cities.

It could cost you between 110-120 CAD inexpensive restaurants in one of the major cities. Costs may go down to 65-75 CAD in restaurants that fall in the mid-range.

A meal at a fast food chain like Mc Donald’s or Subway would be much cheaper. It could cost you somewhere around 10-15 CAD. A soft drink could cost 2- 2.50 CAD and a beer could go up to a maximum of 7 or 8 CAD.

City Food And Groceries — 1 Month Cost Of A Basic Meal Meal At A Fast Food Chain Fine Dining
Vancouver 310-410 18 10 55-125
Toronto 400-520 17 10 55-150
Montreal 200-220 16 11 45-125
Ottawa 200-215 19 10 65-120
Victoria 250-400 19 10 46-110
Burnaby 350-420 18 10 35-100
Calgary 220-320 19 9 55-110

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Healthcare In Canada

Canada does have a free health care system for its citizens and permanent residents. It is a basic healthcare plan that is funded by the government through the taxes collected from taxpayers.

This basic health care plan could vary depending on the province you live in. It is important to keep in mind that there are several things that are not covered in a basic health care plan. To get everything covered when it comes to health care purchasing of additional coverage would be necessary.

If you are a student or someone who does not have health coverage in Canada medical charges would be quite expensive. A short consultation with a doctor would cost around 100 CAD.

Even though the charges of medicines are considered reasonable in Canada it could seem high if you are a student or if you moved to the country recently on a long term visa. Antibiotics could cost around 18-20 Canadian dollars.

City Doctor’s Fee Antibiotics Medicine For Cold
Vancouver 101 24 10
Toronto 106 25 11
Montreal 124 17 10
Ottawa 93 25 10
Victoria 80 33 9
Burnaby 100 25 10
Calgary 65 23 10

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Transportation In Canada

In Canada, you have access to public transportation only in urban areas. So most of the Canadians depend on their own vehicles. The cost of public transportation is quite expensive in Canada.

Hence, the majority of people prefer to buy a vehicle for themselves to cut down the cost of traveling. Fuel prices in Canada are on the higher side compared to the prices in the US. If you have to drive a long way to work or college it’s going to cost you much more when it comes to your living expenses in Canada.

The charges for taxi per kilometer in some of the major cities in Canada like Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver could be anywhere between 1.70 CAD to 2.0 CAD.

Gasoline charges per liter could be between 1.30- 1.50 CAD in these cities. Tickets for public transportation (one-way charges) could be anywhere between 2.85-3.25 CAD.

You could save some money on public transportation if you choose to take a monthly pass.

City Public Transportation Charges
Vancouver 110
Toronto 145
Montreal 82
Ottawa 115
Victoria 83
Burnaby 125
Calgary 104

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Fitness And Entertainment In Canada

Canada offers a number of different sources of entertainment for its people. It is a perfect destination for people who seek adventure and loves nature.

Hiking, trekking, sightseeing, and photography are quite popular in Canada owing to its beautiful landscape, nature and architectural wonders. The fees for each activity could vary from province to province.

A traditional mode of entertainment like a public cinema could cost you between 13-15 CAD depending on the place you live in like Toronto, Montreal or Ottawa.

To get a membership in a fitness club you’ll have to pay somewhere between 40- 57 CAD.

City Gym Membership Movie Tickets For 2 Theatre Tickets For 2
Vancouver 61 27 135
Toronto 61 29 233
Montreal 51 26 143
Ottawa 59 26 125
Victoria 57 26 198
Burnaby 48 27 135
Calgary 83 30 196

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

The cost of living in Canada depends largely on where you choose to live in. Living in the countryside or a rural area could help you save a lot of money as it is much cheaper. Cost of living could also vary depending on the province too.

If you have the freedom to choose a place to live in, comparing the prices of the nearby locations before making a final decision would be a good idea.

If you are looking for a city life be ready to pay more like your living costs. Once you decide on the exact place you want to live in Canada it will be easier for you to decide on a budget for your living expenses.

7 ways to stay healthy aboard a cruise

©iStockphoto/NAN104 Image by: ©iStockphoto/NAN104 Author: Canadian Living

Prevention & Recovery

7 ways to stay healthy aboard a cruise

Cruise ship vacations offer travellers plenty of bang for their buck: all-inclusive meals and drinks, the opportunity to visit several locales, and the relief of unpacking only once. But as news outlets report, cruise passengers often fall ill while sailing the high seas. Read on for ways to avoid illness on your next vacation.


1. Visit a travel clinic
Before embarking on your holiday, book an appointment with a travel clinic. Dr. Suni Boraston, MD, director of the Travel Clinic at Vancouver Coastal Health, says there are two vaccine-preventable illnesses that should be at the top of your watch list: hepatitis A (an infectious liver disease caused by a virus) and influenza. «It’s a very well-kept secret, but there are outbreaks of hepatitis A on cruise ships,» she says. «Much of the staff on cruise ships is from hepatitis A endemic areas of the developing world.» Getting a hepatitis A vaccine will alleviate this worry.

Another must-have is the seasonal flu vaccine. Close proximity to your fellow travellers can result in easy transmission of this contagious virus. Additional vaccines, like yellow fever, may also be administered, depending on your destination.

2. Cruise during the summer
Snowbirds trying to escape Canada’s frosty weather, take note. Norovirus, the infamous stomach bug characterized by nausea and vomiting, is at its peak during the winter months. «We used to call it winter vomiting disease,» says Dr. Boraston. «At this time, norovirus is circulating. When you have people cloistered together on a cruise ship, and one or two people are sick, it could spread wildly. It’s very contagious.» To lower your risk of contracting norovirus, book your cruise vacation for the summer months, when the illness is less active.

3. Wash your hands frequently

While on board, wash your hands with soap and water to defend against viruses. You can also carry your own personal hand sanitizer, but cruise ships are equipped with dispensers in most public areas. Bathrooms, however, are another story. «A study showed that public washrooms on cruise ships weren’t as clean as they should be,» says Dr. Boraston. «I tell people to get some extra exercise and walk back to their room to use their own toilets and sinks.»

4. Be waited on
Buffets can serve up a smorgasbord of illness-causing viruses. When one sick traveller touches a communal serving spoon, traces of the virus could be left behind on the utensil, infecting countless others who use that same spoon. Instead of handling cutlery used by other vacationers, allow the buffet staff to fill your plate. «They will serve you,» says Dr. Boraston. It’s also smart to avoid shaking hands and touching hard surfaces, such as railings, where germs can lurk.

5. Pack insect repellant

If you’re cruising around the Caribbean, Central America, South America, India, Africa or Southeast Asia, you could be at risk for dengue fever, a flu-like illness that’s spread by mosquito bites during the day. Dr. Boraston recommends packing an insect repellant. «When taking day trips off the ship, anoint yourself with an insect repellant that contains at least 20 percent DEET. And wear light-coloured clothing—mosquitoes like dark colours,» she says. Dengue fever won’t kill you, but it could make you sick for seven to 10 days.

6. Bring a first-aid kit
If illness strikes at sea, it’s helpful to have products you can trust from home. Be sure to pack a personalized first-aid kit that includes an anti-nausea medication, an antihistamine, an ointment for cuts, a pain and fever reliever, and an over-the-counter diarrhea remedy. «I also give people an antibiotic prescription in case they get serious travellers diarrhea—an E. coli diarrhea that you might get off-ship from drinking water or eating food in a developing country’s port,» says Dr. Boraston. Seasickness sufferers should also bring along scopolamine patches or Bonamine—two medications that can help relieve symptoms.

7. Stay put
Got an upset stomach or have the urge to visit the bathroom more frequently than normal? Don’t roam the ship and make others sick. «Stay in your room with your own toilet and sink, and lower the risk of passing your illness around,» says Dr. Boraston. If your illness lasts more than 24 hours, it might be a good idea to seek out the onboard medical staff for assistance.

If you have food allergy restrictions, check our tips on how to safely enjoy your vacation.

Living aboard Канада

I live in a Condo right near Mimico and Etobicoke. I’ve met a fellow while walking our dogs who lives aboard a 32′ sailboat at one of the clubs — I forget which. He gets along fine with wife and dog aboard, but I don’t envy him; It’s a hard, long winter.

I also belong to National Yacht Club and to the best of my knowledge there are no live-aboards at the club, nor next door at Alexandra. Ontario place does not do winter storage so no live-aboards there either. It is doubtful that TSCC has the capabilities for live-aboards. No winter storage at Marina Quay West either.

Your best bet would be Bluffers; but that’s a long way from downtown. Mimico might be an option.

Other places I don’t know about.
Outer Harbour Marina.

Ashbridges Bay.
Port Credit Harbour (good luck googling that or getting responsive service, try 905.274.1595)

Sorry but you are incorrect. There have been no liveaboards at Ashbridges or Outer harbour for many years but the entire Marina Quay West is full of winter liveaboards, I have many friends who winter there.

Some places are a little more difficult to handle than others. At Port Credit Yacht Club we have water and pump out all winter long. There are a few tricks to a comfortable winter on board but it ain’t rocket science. When it gets cold we just turn up the heat like anyone else

Living aboard Канада

A Graduate that don’t know where to apply full stop, space between full stop(.) before the next word, paragraph and proper sentence composure, what a shame. I wonder if you are for real, and not trying to dupe desperate people who think Canada is paved with gold on the street.

And its Abroad not Aboard

(no pun intended, just my thought)

Re: Studying Aboard (canada) by Ezegozie( m ): 10:53pm On Oct 28, 2012

i will like to do my Msc in petroluem geoscience in any good and cheap university in canada after i graduate.
PLS, I WANT YOU TO HELP ME ON THE FOLLOWING

(1)LIKE HOW MUCH WILL IT COST ME TO STUDY THE COURSE THERE, SINCE MOST OF THE UNIVERSITIES OVER THERE DONT PUT THEIR TUITION FEE IN THEIR WEBSITE.
(2) what is the cost of living in canada? High or low.
(3)how much is the flight fee for traveling from Nigeria to Canada?
WAITING FOR UR REPLY. Thanks

Re: Studying Aboard (canada) by violent( m ): 11:33pm On Oct 28, 2012

This post is being moved to educational services. If you intend to charge for your services, then you should endeavour to make your post in the appropriate sections.

dahonestboss: A Graduate that don’t know where to apply full stop, space between full stop(.) before the next word, paragraph and proper sentence composure, what a shame. I wonder if you are for real, and not trying to dupe desperate people who thinks Canada is paved with gold on the street.

And its Abroad not Aboard

(no pun intended, just my thought)

Re: Studying Aboard (canada) by djty2( m ): 2:01am On Nov 27, 2012

violent:
This post is being moved to educational services. If you intend to charge for your services, then you should endeavour to make your post in the appropriate sections.

If you intend to correct people’s use of English, the least you could do is to get it right yourself. People who think. not people who thinks.

Re: Studying Aboard (canada) by Ezegozie( m ): 10:56pm On Feb 28, 2013

@dahonestboss That is not a polite way to correct people and moreover English is not my mother tongue so i’m allowed to make mistakes. The post wasn’t just something i spent so much time on. Between, i’m not saying people should come and work here.
@ Ezegozie I’m not really sure of the cost, will help you look up some schools.
Cost of living? i think that question is subjective. To me it’s ok, just that you pay tax on almost everything.
Flight cost? i paid 330,000 but a friend that came two days later paid 250,000. So, i’ll say between 230,000 — 350,000 depending on the airline.

thanx, i read from the internet about UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA and UNIVERSITY of CALGARY. I heard they are good in the course i wanna study PETROLEUM GEOSCIENCE.

The problem is that their fees is too much, about $18000 (#2800000) just for school fees. Then, you pay for your accomodation, textbooks and also have some money for your feeding.

They also told me that i can pay per terms. Please do you know how many terms they usually have in a year in canadian universities.
In Nigeria, we have 1st and 2nd semesta (not terms).

Also, is their any organisation i can borrow some money here in Nigeria or in that place, to supplement the cash i have?

By God’s grace, i will graduate with a good result that will fetch me a good position in the oil company. And i promise to pay with interest for any assistance that will be rendered to me. Even you can help lend me some money under strong collateral and assurance.

Thanx for your information

Re: Studying Aboard (canada) by Ezegozie( m ): 11:02pm On Feb 28, 2013

@dahonestboss That is not a polite way to correct people and moreover English is not my mother tongue so i’m allowed to make mistakes. The post wasn’t just something i spent so much time on. Between, i’m not saying people should come and work here.
@ Ezegozie I’m not really sure of the cost, will help you look up some schools.
Cost of living? i think that question is subjective. To me it’s ok, just that you pay tax on almost everything.
Flight cost? i paid 330,000 but a friend that came two days later paid 250,000. So, i’ll say between 230,000 — 350,000 depending on the airline.

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What Is The Cost Of Living In Canada?

Canada is one of the most popular destinations for students and immigrants. What is the average cost of living in Canada? Did you know that renting a furnished apartment in an expensive residential area could cost around 2,500 Canadian dollars?

A meal at a fast food chain like Mc Donald’s or Subway would cost you somewhere around 10-15 CAD.

In this article, we discuss the average cost of living in Canada in terms of:

  • Accommodation
  • Utility charges
  • Food and grocery
  • Healthcare fee
  • Entertainment
  • Public transportation

Ontario, Canada Image Courtesy James Wheeler

Canada – What Attracts Immigrants To Canada

Before we discuss the average monthly cost of living in Canada, let us know a bit about the country. The country is known for its beautiful geographical features and acceptance of diversity. This nation also happens to be one of the most multicultural countries in the world.

The landscape is varied in nature with beautiful and serene lakes and rivers, glorious mountains, valleys covered in forests and rolling hills and plains. It indeed is a perfect destination for anyone who wants to live in a great country.

Besides, this nation is well known for its government that is socially progressive, universal health care programmes, high quality of life, and for its kind and friendly people.

No wonder this country happens to be one of the top destinations in the world that people consider migrating to in spite of the extremely cold temperatures in the winters.

If you are planning to move to Canada one of the first things to consider is how much it will cost you to move to that place and the cost of living in Canada. You could be moving to Canada as a student or an employee.

You could also be moving there as a permanent resident. Whatever your reason to migrate to Canada, you need to have a clear understanding of the cost of living in this nation.

Let’s take a look at how much it would cost a person to live in Canada.

Cost Of Living In Canada – The Most Expensive Cities

Given below is the list of the most expensive cities to live in Canada.

  • Toronto in Ontario
  • Vancouver in British Columbia
  • Victoria in British Columbia
  • Hamilton-Burlington in Ontario
  • Calgary in Alberta

Cost Of Living In Canada – The Cheapest Places

When you choose to live in a place outside the major cities of Canada you can cut down on your cost of living. Some of the cheapest places to live in Canada are given below.

  • Abbotsford in British Columbia
  • St. Catherine’s in Ontario
  • Moncton in New Brunswick
  • The province of Quebec (Any place can be chosen)

Cost Of Living In Canada – Rent And Housing

Just like any other country the residential costs and rent happen to be the major portion of the cost of living in Canada. Toronto in Ontario and Vancouver in British Columbia are the most popular cities in Canada chosen by people to migrate.

Hence, these two remain the most expensive of all cities in Canada when it comes to making your place of residence. Renting a furnished apartment in an expensive residential area could come up to at least 2,500 Canadian dollars.

Choosing to live in cities like Ottawa, Montreal or Calgary could bring down the costs of housing and rent slightly. The rent could come around 2,000 Canadian dollars for a furnished apartment in these places. You could also enjoy a high-quality life in these cities just like you would do in Vancouver.

If you are looking for a much quieter and peaceful life you could skip the cities for a smaller town or a remote area. The housing costs and rent in such places are much cheaper than what you pay in the cities.

You could find a one-roomed furnished apartment for less than 1,000 Canadian dollars. Let’s take a look at the rental charges for a house in some of the major places in Canada for 2020.

City Rent — 1 Bedroom Houses Rent — 2 Bedroom Houses
Vancouver 2,100 3,200
Toronto 2,300 2,900
Montreal 1,500 1,800
Ottawa 1,300 1,550
Victoria 1,400 1,750
Burnaby 1,600 2,250
Calgary 1,100 1,350


Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Living In Canada Utility Charges

Besides rental charges a person living in Canada has to pay a monthly charge for utilities like electricity, water, heating, and gas. On average, a person living in Canada pays around 90-95 CAD (Canadian Dollars) per month as utility charges.

If you are single or a student you can save on housing charges by sharing a flat. Students can also consider applying for a University accommodation to cut down housing charges.

City Utility Charges
Vancouver 116
Toronto 126
Montreal 117
Ottawa 132
Victoria 138
Burnaby 110
Calgary 193

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Food And Groceries In Canada

Even though the cost of groceries and food in Canada is not considered too expensive the prices could be slightly higher than the cost of food in countries like the USA.

This is because a major portion of the food and groceries that you get in Canada are imported due to the extremely cold weather in the country. However, if you compare the prices to many of the European nations the cost of food is cheaper in Canada.

Going out for a meal or dinner would be expensive in cities like Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal. It is much cheaper when you dine at a hotel in a remote town or small cities.

It could cost you between 110-120 CAD inexpensive restaurants in one of the major cities. Costs may go down to 65-75 CAD in restaurants that fall in the mid-range.

A meal at a fast food chain like Mc Donald’s or Subway would be much cheaper. It could cost you somewhere around 10-15 CAD. A soft drink could cost 2- 2.50 CAD and a beer could go up to a maximum of 7 or 8 CAD.

City Food And Groceries — 1 Month Cost Of A Basic Meal Meal At A Fast Food Chain Fine Dining
Vancouver 310-410 18 10 55-125
Toronto 400-520 17 10 55-150
Montreal 200-220 16 11 45-125
Ottawa 200-215 19 10 65-120
Victoria 250-400 19 10 46-110
Burnaby 350-420 18 10 35-100
Calgary 220-320 19 9 55-110

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Healthcare In Canada

Canada does have a free health care system for its citizens and permanent residents. It is a basic healthcare plan that is funded by the government through the taxes collected from taxpayers.

This basic health care plan could vary depending on the province you live in. It is important to keep in mind that there are several things that are not covered in a basic health care plan. To get everything covered when it comes to health care purchasing of additional coverage would be necessary.

If you are a student or someone who does not have health coverage in Canada medical charges would be quite expensive. A short consultation with a doctor would cost around 100 CAD.

Even though the charges of medicines are considered reasonable in Canada it could seem high if you are a student or if you moved to the country recently on a long term visa. Antibiotics could cost around 18-20 Canadian dollars.

City Doctor’s Fee Antibiotics Medicine For Cold
Vancouver 101 24 10
Toronto 106 25 11
Montreal 124 17 10
Ottawa 93 25 10
Victoria 80 33 9
Burnaby 100 25 10
Calgary 65 23 10

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Transportation In Canada

In Canada, you have access to public transportation only in urban areas. So most of the Canadians depend on their own vehicles. The cost of public transportation is quite expensive in Canada.

Hence, the majority of people prefer to buy a vehicle for themselves to cut down the cost of traveling. Fuel prices in Canada are on the higher side compared to the prices in the US. If you have to drive a long way to work or college it’s going to cost you much more when it comes to your living expenses in Canada.

The charges for taxi per kilometer in some of the major cities in Canada like Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver could be anywhere between 1.70 CAD to 2.0 CAD.

Gasoline charges per liter could be between 1.30- 1.50 CAD in these cities. Tickets for public transportation (one-way charges) could be anywhere between 2.85-3.25 CAD.

You could save some money on public transportation if you choose to take a monthly pass.

City Public Transportation Charges
Vancouver 110
Toronto 145
Montreal 82
Ottawa 115
Victoria 83
Burnaby 125
Calgary 104

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

Cost Of Fitness And Entertainment In Canada

Canada offers a number of different sources of entertainment for its people. It is a perfect destination for people who seek adventure and loves nature.

Hiking, trekking, sightseeing, and photography are quite popular in Canada owing to its beautiful landscape, nature and architectural wonders. The fees for each activity could vary from province to province.

A traditional mode of entertainment like a public cinema could cost you between 13-15 CAD depending on the place you live in like Toronto, Montreal or Ottawa.

To get a membership in a fitness club you’ll have to pay somewhere between 40- 57 CAD.

City Gym Membership Movie Tickets For 2 Theatre Tickets For 2
Vancouver 61 27 135
Toronto 61 29 233
Montreal 51 26 143
Ottawa 59 26 125
Victoria 57 26 198
Burnaby 48 27 135
Calgary 83 30 196

Note: Price in Canadian Dollars (CAD)

The cost of living in Canada depends largely on where you choose to live in. Living in the countryside or a rural area could help you save a lot of money as it is much cheaper. Cost of living could also vary depending on the province too.

If you have the freedom to choose a place to live in, comparing the prices of the nearby locations before making a final decision would be a good idea.

If you are looking for a city life be ready to pay more like your living costs. Once you decide on the exact place you want to live in Canada it will be easier for you to decide on a budget for your living expenses.

Tips on Houseboat Living in Canada — house boats let us live our dream.

by Philippe-Pierre Doucet
(Okanagan Lake, BC, Canada)

Houseboat Living — We live on our house boat dream home.

We’re houseboat living in Canada, and house boats are our way that we live our dream on a daily basis. We live on a 60 ft Three Buoys houseboat in Canada with my fiancee, and though the temperature is not too bad for Canada, we have found it to get a bit chilly.

So we have a built-in propane furnace, and a few ceramic heaters that we power by generator. We have found that when the temperature dips below 0 deg F, we confine ourselves to living in the room with the furnace.

We also find that by using the thick duvet and several blankets helps a lot, and also having a loving spouse (we also have a big dog, a 100 lb german sheppard) to snuggle up with is a life saver.

We’re not moored in a marina, but are tied to a buoy in the middle of a lake. Our dog is not very well behaved in the canoe, so taking him to shore is an adventure twice a week.


We do however have converted our lawn, into a huge kiddy pool (the lake), and have a 60ft X 15ft upper deck we use for exercise.

Houseboat Living in Canada, Philippe-Pierre Doucet.

You can advertise here for pennies a day! Are you a boating related business and want to
increase sales and profits with targeted traffic?

Reply — Answer
Well Philippe-Pierre, welcome to the houseboat forums, and congratulations on your story on how to live on a houseboat in Canada.

You made some great points about living on a boat.

1) It helps when you have a great spouse who loves to live on a boat.

2) The built-in propane furnaces can generate plenty of heat for chilly weather.

3) It just goes to show that pets and houseboats, can live well together.

4) The Oliver, Penticton, and Okanagan area is a beautiful part of British Columbia.

I have listed some articles below for folks who are contemplating living on a houseboat in a cold winter climate:

Lastly, hopefully some of our readers will share and post comments about their houseboat living dreams and experiences. Feel free to use the «Click here to post comments.» link found near the bottom of this page.

Thanks again for sharing, IAN from all-about-houseboats

Free Bonus Offer

To show our deep appreciation to all of our readers and visitors, here is the link to our free houseboat magazine, the INSIDER. Go ahead click the book and sign-up, it’s free and filled with great articles, tips, information and website updates.

Comments for Tips on Houseboat Living in Canada — house boats let us live our dream.

Being harassed by MNR
by: Anonymous

We have a houseboat in Ontario and are constantly being harassed by the MNR stating we have to move our houseboat every 21 days, stating the water is crown land. we can’t seem to find the appropriate laws to dispute their claim, and can’t afford a lawyer. If anyone has a link to, or any written documents that would help us please email me at tanyaviau@hotmail.com with subject being ONTARIO HOUSEBOAT LAWS. Thank you In advance

newbie wanting to learn
by: Anonymous

I would really like to know the rules and regulations for living year round on a house boat expenses and how plausible this is in ontario

Doing research
by: Reggie

I am very interested in buying a houseboat and living on it in Okanagan Lake. I just have a few questions.
What are the laws on where you can and cannot dock the boat?
How much does it cost to store It for the winter time?
Is there a specific website or newspaper to look for used houseboats to buy?
What is the best motor or engine for the boat?
You can email me at regg72@hotmail.com since I am very keen on getting this balling rolling.

houseboat on the St. Lawrence River
by: Anonymous

Is there a rule on anchoring houseboats along the river? Is there a time frame? Also, is there a ruling on how many feet from shoreline?

Thanks

Rivers or Oceans
by: Anonymous

Very helpful info. Thank you!
I found myself here after watching a Buzzfeed video where a woman lives on a houseboat in California.

Looking around the lower mainland in Vancouver, Stevesten and Langley I don’t see any houseboats (but there are floating homes).

Possibly a stupid questions, but would a houseboat not work in the ocean or river here in BC?
Thanks again!!

Houseboat legalities?
by: Kevin

Hi, are you still living off of a houseboat and have you come across any legal issues? Inquiring to a friend she informed me that you may no longer be allowed to park a houseboat off Okanogan Lake. What are the guidelines and legalities?

Ontario houseboating
by: Bob

As far as I know, leaving a houseboat at any marina near you is fine. While out on the lake, I think you are required to move your houseboat/campsite every 21 days.

Winter moorage for houseboats
by: GuyThaLizard

Are you still living in your houseboat on Okanagan? I am not sure how old this post is. We are considering living on a houseboat on Okanagan also.

We live in Penticton is there any winter moorage on Okanagan Lake that you know of, ie: Summerland or Naramata?

Thanks

Houseboat Rules — planning on living in houseboat
by: Anonymous

What rules and regulations are there for Canada based lakes as far as parking docking your houseboat (long term) at marinas, deserted island, or just any shore?

I really want to know the above. Please let me know.

Boards Of Canada (SCO) — афиша концертов в Москве и СПБ

Концерты Boards Of Canada в Москве:

Концерты Boards Of Canada в Санкт-Петербурге:

Официальный сайт:
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Годы существования:
1986 — по настоящее время

Состав:
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Маркус Эойн (Marcus Eoin)

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