Main duties & Employment requirements Канада


Canada Express Entry: Does My Work Experience Meet Requirements?

September 30, 2020 – Work experience is an important factor considered under Canada Express Entry, and must meet specific requirements and skill levels.

Up to 80 points can be gained towards a candidate’s Comprehensive Ranking System score with five years of work experience in a specific field. That 80 points can easily be enough to secure a coveted Invitation to Apply.

In certain cases, such as the Federal Skilled Worker Program, candidates require a minimum of one year of work experience to qualify under Express Entry.

The experience also needs to be in a field referenced under Canada’s National Occupational Classification 0, A or B, for which more details are included below.

Candidates can also accumulate work experience while they are in the Express Entry Pool, scoring extra points while in the pool.

This following is guidance issued to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada case officers when considering work experience

The Minimum Work Experience Requirement

The authorities have prescribed certain work experience requirements that applicants would need to meet. To meet these requirements, applicants would need to:

  • Have accumulated at least one year of continuous full-time paid work experience (refer to Appendix A) or,
  • Have acquired an equivalent amount of continuous paid part-time work experience

These applicants would need to have acquired this work experience in the occupation identified in their application for permanent residence as their primary occupation.

In addition, this occupation must be present in the following occupational categories specified in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2011, such as:

  • Skill Type 0 i.e. managerial occupations
  • Skill Level A i.e. professional occupations or,
  • Skill Level B i.e. technical occupations and skilled trades

This is in accordance with the provisions specified in R75 (2) (a).

Furthermore, in order to meet the prescribed minimum requirements, the applicant would need to possess skilled work experience that:

  • Has taken place within the 10 years preceding the date of the applicant’s application for permanent residence and,
  • Is not in an occupation that the authorities have designated as being a restricted occupation

In addition, during that specific period of employment, the applicant would need to:

  • Ensure that they have performed the actions specified in the lead statement for the occupation as described in the occupational descriptions of the National Occupational Classification (NOC) matrix [this is in accordance with the provisions specified in R75 (2) (b)]
    • This also includes carrying out a substantial number of the main duties, including all the essential duties, as specified in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) matrix [this is in accordance with the provisions specified in R75 (2) (c)]
  • Readers would need to note that at the time of publication, the authorities had not designated any occupations as being restricted.
  • It is Worthing noting an applicant will not need to demonstrate that they meet the “Employment Requirements” listed in the National Occupational Classification (NOC) occupational description to qualify under Express Entry.

Interested employers: Kindly contact us here to receive further information.

Interested candidates: Find out whether you qualify to Canada by completing our free on-line evaluation. We will provide you with our evaluation within 1-2 business days.

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Canada Federal Skilled Worker Program points requirements

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Introduction

Applicants for Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker Program must score a minimum of 67 points from the following tables to qualify for a visa. Applicants are scored on 6 factors:

Factor 1: English and/or French language ability

Factor 2: Education

Factor 3: Skilled work experience

Factor 5: Arranged employment in Canada

Factor 6: Adaptability

Overview of Changes

Recent changes to Canadian immigration law made on May 4 th 2013 mean all applicants for the federal Skilled Worker Program must meet certain basic requirements for work experience, education, age, and language ability. These basic requirements are a listed on our Federal Skilled Worker Program page.

As of 5 November 2011, Canadian Citizenship and Immigration will accept a total of 1,000 applications from international students who have completed at least two years of study towards a PhD and or who graduated from a Canadian PhD program in the 12 months before the date their application is received.

Factor 1: English and French language ability — maximum 28 points

Applicants must have reasonable proficiency in English, French, or both languages. To prove this applicants must provide test results from the following language test providers on their Express Entry profile BEFORE they can apply for a visa:

Applicants are tested on 4 language components: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Applicants must meet at least Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) level 7 in all 4 components of the language test for their ‘first official language’ (either English or French) for a maximum of 24 points. Applicants can then be awarded an additional 4 points if they achieve CLB level 5 in their ‘second official language’.

CLB level in ‘first official language’

Speaking points

Listening points

Reading points

Writing points

CLB level 5 in all 4 components+

CLB level 4 or less in any component

Factor 2: Education — maximum 25 points

Applicants must have the following educational qualifications:

A Canadian secondary school certificate, or post secondary qualification, such as a college diploma or university degree, OR;

A foreign qualification, and an Educational Credential assessment, stating that the qualification is equivalent to a Canadian secondary or post secondary qualification, from one of the following organisations:

Qualification

Points

University degree at PhD level or equivalent

University degree at Master’s level or equivalent

University entry-to-practice degree or equivalent. This degree must be related to a profession at NOC Skill Level A, must be licensed by a provincial regulatory body, and must be in one of the following fields:

Two or more Canadian post-secondary degrees/diplomas or equivalent, one of which must be for a program lasting 3 years or more

A Canadian post-secondary degree/diploma or equivalent, for a program lasting 3 years or more

A Canadian post-secondary degree/diploma or equivalent, for a program lasting 2 years or more

A Canadian post-secondary degree/diploma or equivalent, for a program lasting 1 year or more

A Canadian high school diploma or equivalent

Factor 3: Work experience — maximum 15 points

Federal Skilled Worker Program applicants must have significant work experience in a skilled role, which must meet the following conditions:

Must have totalled at least 1,560 hours; approximately one year of full time work.

Must have been gained in a paid job, or multiple paid jobs

Must have been gained within the last 10 years

Must have been gained in a managerial, skilled professional, or skilled trade role; Skill Type 0, Skill Level A, or Skill Level B in Canada’s National Occupational Classification system (NOC).
A full list of FSWP eligible trades on the NOC can be found on our Canada National Occupation Classification List

You can check that you meet the Canada visa requirements by following the relevant links on out NOC list, or by taking note of the 4 digit code next to your profession and entering it on the NOC website.

You must make sure that your work experience matches that stated in the NOC. You do not have to meet the «employment requirements» section of the particular job listed on NOC.

You may need to look at a number of different occupations to find one that matches your work experience. If your occupation does not come under skill level O, A or B or your experience did not occur in the last ten years your application will be refused.

Once you have confirmed that you meet the above requirements, you can now estimate your points score. You are granted 15 points for one year of work experience and two points for each further year up to a maximum of 21 points.

4156 Employment Counsellors

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    • 415 Social And Community Service Professionals
      • » 4151 Psychologists
      • » 4152 Social workers
      • » 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors
      • » 4154 Professional occupations in religion
      • » 4155 Probation and parole officers and related occupations

4156 — Employment Counsellors


Employment counsellors provide assistance and information to job seeker clients on all aspects of employment search and career planning. They also provide advice and information to employer clients regarding employment issues and human resources. Employment counsellors are employed by human resource departments of establishments, employment service organizations, consulting firms, correctional facilities and by federal and provincial governments. Supervisors of employment counsellors are included in this unit group.

  • Illustrative example(s)
    • career counsellor — except education
    • career development counsellor
    • employment counsellor
    • outplacement counsellor
    • relocation consultant
    • relocation counselor
  • All Examples
  • Aboriginal employment developer
  • Aboriginal employment officer
  • Aboriginal employment worker
  • career coach
  • career counsellor — except education
  • career development counsellor
  • career development facilitator
  • career development practitioner
  • career group facilitator
  • career resource centre co-ordinator
  • counsellor, employment
  • counsellor, employment — government services
  • counsellor, employment group
  • counsellor, job
  • counsellor, job — government services
  • counsellor, outplacement
  • counsellor, relocation
  • employment consultant
  • employment counsellor
  • employment counsellor — government services
  • employment group counsellor
  • employment outreach counsellor
  • employment outreach program co-ordinator
  • employment outreach program counsellor
  • employment services assessment officer
  • employment services officer
  • group counsellor, employment services
  • job counsellor
  • job counsellor — government services
  • job search trainer
  • labour market information consultant
  • outplacement consultant
  • outplacement counsellor
  • outreach counsellor, employment
  • outreach program co-ordinator, employment
  • outreach program counsellor, employment
  • relocation consultant
  • relocation counsellor
  • workforce adjustment officer
  • workforce development officer
  • Exclusion(s)
    • Educational counsellors (4033)
    • Employment insurance officers (See 1228 Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers)
    • Human resources and recruitment officers (1223)
    • Job coaches for persons with disabilities (See 4215 Instructors of persons with disabilities)
    • Vocational rehabilitation counsellors (See 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors)
  • Main duties

Employment counsellors perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Interview clients to obtain employment history, educational background and career goals
  • Identify barriers to employment and assist clients with such matters as job readiness skills, job search strategies, writing résumés and preparing for job interviews
  • Assess need for assistance such as rehabilitation, financial aid or further training and refer clients to the appropriate services
  • Provide established workers with information and strategies for maintaining a job or moving within an organization, dealing with job dissatisfaction, making mid-career changes and adjusting to workplace transitions
  • Collect labour market information for clients regarding job openings, entry and skill requirements and other occupational information
  • Advise employers on human resource and other employment-related issues
  • Provide consulting services to community groups and agencies, businesses, industry and other organizations involved in providing community-based career planning support or resources
  • May administer and interpret tests designed to determine the interests, aptitudes and abilities of clients.
  • Employment requirements
    • A bachelor’s degree or college diploma in employment counselling, career development or in a related field, such as human resources development, psychology, education or social services is required.
    • A master’s degree in counselling psychology or a related field such as educational psychology, developmental psychology or social work may be required.
    • In Quebec, membership in a professional association is mandatory to use the title »counsellor».
  • Additional information
    • Mobility to positions in personnel or training is possible.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible through experience.

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Variations to Minimum Advertising Requirements

Minimum Advertisement Requirements and Variations

Here at CIP we are here to guide you through every aspect of the LMIA process. This includes walking you through the minimum advertisement requirements and variations to said requirements.

Advertising requirements can govern where you advertise for certain positions as well as the language used in the advertisement. CIP is happy to go over your advertisements to make sure they meet all of the requirements.

Standard Recruitment Requirements

For Higher-Skilled Occupations, the Service Canada website states that recruitment requirements will be met if mandatory information is placed in public advertisements that provide a broad exposure of the vacancy to Canadian citizens and permanent residents in Canada who would be potential candidates for the position.

As per the ESDC website, to meet the minimum advertising requirements, employers must advertise:

  • On the national Job Bank or its provincial/territorial counterpart in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, the Northwest Territories, Quebec or Newfoundland and Labrador
    • The advertisement must be posted for a minimum of 4 weeks starting from the first day the ad appears and is accessible to the general public.
    • The advertisement must remain posted to actively seek qualified Canadians and permanent residents until the date a labour market opinion is issued.
  • Using 2 or more additional methods of recruitment consistent with the normal practice for the occupation.
    • As a minimum, employers must choose one method that is national in scope, since people in higher-skilled positions are often mobile and willing to re-locate for work. Employers can choose one or more recruitment methods among these:
      • print media (national or provincial/territorial newspapers, national journals, magazines with national coverage, specialized journals, professional associations magazines, newsletters, etc.)
      • general employment websites (canadastop100.com, vault.com, workopolis.com, monster.ca, etc.)
      • specialized websites dedicated to specific occupation profiles (e.g. accounting, marketing, biotechnology, education, engineering, etc.)
      • The advertisement must be posted for a minimum of 4 weeks starting from the first day the ad appears and is accessible to the general public.


Employers must demonstrate that the print media and website used to advertise target an audience that has the appropriate education, professional experience and/or skill level required for the occupation.

Employers must provide proof of advertisement and the results of their efforts to recruit Canadian citizens and permanent residents (e.g. copy of advertisement and information to support where, when and for how long the position was advertised)

Employers recruiting higher-skilled workers, in areas where the use of the Job Bank or its provincial/territorial counterparts is not considered an effective method of recruitment, must provide a written explanation of the alternative method used with their LMIA application. In general, Service Canada will be very unwilling to accept the explanation.

Each advertisement must include:

  • Company operating name
  • Business address
  • Title of position
  • Job duties (for each position, if advertising more than one vacancy)
  • Terms of employment (e.g. project based, permanent position)
  • Wage
    • a wage range can be used for the purposes of complying with the advertisement requirements; however, the minimum wage in the range must be the prevailing wage;
    • (refer to Wages, Working Conditions and Occupations tab to determine the established rate for the specific occupation and geographic area)
  • Benefits package being offered (if applicable)
  • Location of work (local area, city or town)
  • Contact information: telephone number, cell phone number, email address, fax number, or mailing address; and Skills requirements: Education
  • Work experience

There are practically no exceptions to this, and a Service Canada officer once informed me that a LMIA application was refused because the job advertisement did not contain a postal code (although I believe this decision was overturned). Service Canada is also right now being extremely inflexible about companies not publicly posting wages in their advertisements. Our office was once told that should an employer wish to submit a Labour Market Impact Assessment application for a senior director who made over $2,000,000.00 per annum that it would have to run advertisements stating the wage.

Other methods of recruitment can include:

  • participation at job fairs;
  • partnering with training institutions or offering internships;
  • Use of professional recruitment agencies;
  • Consultations with unions for available labour;
  • Advertising through professional associations; or
  • Recruitment within the company (e.g. considering internal candidates for the position). Such companies may wish to provide a Human Resources Plan that outlines (i) the training opportunities for existing employees, (ii) a list of competencies for the employees, (iii) workshops and/or programs for professional development and career management, or (iv) specific programs to target specific employees for advancement.

For Lower-Skilled Positions, employers must also target under represented groups (aboriginal peoples, youth, older workers, persons with disabilities, and recent immigrants). The ESDC website states:

  • try to recruit workers from local or provincial/territorial employment centres, service centres for Aboriginal youth, new immigrants and people with disabilities;
  • offer bursaries to attract students or youth, pursue online recruitment strategies, or undertake ongoing advertising and interviews in order to maintain a pre-screened applicant pool.

Variations

Academics (University Professors)

Description: The position is for an academic and is not covered by any other applicable Labour Market Impact Assessment exemption.

Foreign workers who need a work permit, but do not require a Labour Market Impact Assessment, include:

  • Post-doctoral fellows;
  • Research award recipients;
  • Eminent individuals, for example leaders in various fields;
  • Guest lecturers;
  • Visiting professors;
  • Citizens of the U.S. and Mexico appointed as professors under the university, college and seminary levels of the North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA); and
  • Citizens of Chile appointed as professors under the Canada Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA).

Variation: The employer must conduct recruitment efforts as per the following:

  • Advertise vacant positions in Canada;
  • Make sure any vacant position advertised abroad is also advertised simultaneously in Canada;
  • Advertise for a reasonable length of time (about a month) to allow broad exposure of the vacancy to Canadians and permanent residents;
  • Demonstrate that the advertising medium used (web, print or electronic) is effective in attracting appropriate candidates for the position;
  • Include in the advertisement this statement: “All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority”;
  • Meet all conditions of applicable collective agreements;
  • Outline the educational institution’s hiring decision and providing summaries of Canadian applicants verified by the vice-president (academic) or other senior academic official of the educational institution; and
  • Be prepared to fill a yearly summary report on recruitment practices for Canadian academics and results.

Applicability: All Provinces

Camp Counsellors

Description: The position is for a camp counsellor who will be working in Ontario.

Variation: The employer must provide documentation (e.g. job offer letters) showing efforts to hire Canadian campers from the previous year and a commitment in writing. Moreover, the employer should commit to pursue Spring recruitment campaigns in high schools and post-secondary institutions.

Applicability: Ontario only

Certificate of Selection from Quebec

Description: Employers who intend to hire a foreign national who has been selected by Quebec as a first step to get permanent residence and who has received a Certificate of Selection in Quebec (CSQ).

Variation: Employers can be exempted from the recruitment and advertising requirement only if Service Canada determines, during the assessment of the LMIA application, that the National Occupational Classification (NOC) code used for the job offer and the description of the position is the same as the NOC code found on the CSQ.

Employers will be required to conduct all recruitment efforts, as per the minimum advertising requirements, if Service Canada determines that the NOC code listed on the CSQ is not the same as the one mentioned on the LMIA application.

As of June 1, 2012, employers hiring a temporary foreign worker who has a CSQ and who resides in the province of Quebec may not require a LMIA.

Applicability: Quebec only

Collective Bargaining Agreement that Stipulates Internal Recruitment

Description: The position is part of a collective bargaining agreement that contains provisions for hiring/promoting through internal staffing processes. This pertains to cases where a temporary foreign worker started employment, as per the original approved LMIA and work permit, but who has, through an internal hiring process — stipulated for a collective bargaining unit through a Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) — was promoted to a different occupation. In this case a new LMIA and work permit would be required since the foreign worker was hired in a different occupation.

Variation: In this case, internal posting for the position, as per the CBA, will suffice to satisfy minimum advertising requirements. Specifically, the employer must provide the internal posting of the opportunity for promotion. All members of the Collective Bargaining Unit must have had an opportunity to apply for the position.

It is important to note that an internal posting for a position can only be accepted as minimum advertising requirements for workplaces/positions that are covered by a CBA, which stipulates internal recruitment. This does not extend to promotions granted in other scenarios.

Applicability: All Provinces

Digital Media Occupations

Description: The position is for one of the following occupations:

  • Software Engineers and Designers (NOC 2173)
  • Graphic Designers and Illustrators (NOC 5241)

The advertising variation is limited to Digital Entertainment Software Engineer (NOC 2173) and Digital Artist (NOC 5241) positions within the video gaming and digital animation/visual effects industries. These positions require highly-specialized skills and/or unique artistic talents in order to complete projects successfully.

Variation: No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: British Columbia and Ontario

Employer Associations

Description: An employer association can be authorized to advertise on behalf of one or more of its members.

Variation: An employer association advertising for positions on behalf of an employer, or a number of employers, must advertise according to the general advertising requirements for NOC 0, A, B, C and D.

In addition, the following documents must be submitted with the employer’s LMIA application:

  • a signed Appointment of Representative form, specifically authorizing the third-party representative to act on their behalf. Service Canada officers may, at their discretion, contact employers directly to confirm the authorization; and
  • a report on recruitment efforts, to demonstrate that the position was advertised, and include copies of the advertisements, the number of Canadian or permanent resident applicants, and why the applicants were not hired.

Employer associations, who are conducting advertising for more than one job for the same employer, or are advertising for multiple employers, must ensure that the advertisement includes the wage range for each job and location. The wage range must always include the prevailing wage for the position.

Applicability: All Provinces

Entertainment Sector

Description: The position is for a specific occupation in the entertainment sector where a worker is often hired for a very limited number of days, in a specific location, and on very short notice (e.g., boxers, bar bands, DJ’s, musicians, singers, film directors and first assistant directors for feature films and commercials, key actors, artists, film or television crew for short productions and commercials, etc.).

Variation: No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: All Provinces

Hiring by a Foreign Government

Description: The position is with an international organization or the mission of a foreign government, but is not exempt under Section 186 (work permit not required) or Section 204 (business visitor under GATS or NAFTA) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations.

Variation: In such cases, the international organization or foreign government will have selected the foreign national according to its own process and in light of its own requirements. No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: All Provinces

On-farm Primary Agriculture (Higher-skilled and Lower-skilled Occupations)

Description: Employers hiring temporary foreign workers to work in on-farm primary agriculture have specific advertising criteria that must be met for:

  • higher-skilled positions such as farm managers/supervisors and specialized livestock workers (specifically National Occupational Classification (NOC) codes 8251, 8252, 8253, 8254 and 8256); and
  • lower-skilled positions such as general farm workers, nursery and greenhouse workers and harvesting labourers (specifically NOC codes 8431, 8432 and 8611).

Variation: To meet the minimum advertising requirements, employers must advertise on the national Job Bank or its provincial/territorial counterpart in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories, Quebec or Saskatchewan. The advertisement must be posted:

  • for a minimum of 14 calendar days starting from the first day the ad appears and is accessible to the general public; and
  • during the three-month period prior to the employer applying for a LMIA.

Employers must also conduct recruitment activities consistent with the normal practice for the occupation for a minimum of 14 calendar days. To meet this requirement, employers must choose one or more of the following methods to advertise:

  • on recognized Internet employment sites such as Monster, Workopolis;
  • in local and regional newspapers, newsletters;
  • in ethnic newspapers and Internet sites;
  • in local stores, places of worship, community resource centres; or
  • in local and regional employment centres.

The advertisement must include the:


  • Company operating name;
  • Business address;
  • Title of position;
  • Job duties (for each position, if advertising more than one vacancy);
  • Terms of employment;
  • Wage;
  • Benefits package being offered (if applicable);
  • Location of work (local area, city or town);
  • Contact information: telephone number, cell phone number, email address, fax number, or mailing address; and
  • Skills requirements:
    • Education; and
    • Work experience.

Third-party representatives or recruiters can be the main contact for any job advertisements posted on behalf of the employer. However, the advertisement must be listed under the employer’s Canada Revenue Agency business number.

Owners/Operators

Description: The position is for business owners and does not refer to individuals who receive shares as part of a compensation package. To qualify as an owner/operator, the foreign national must:

  • demonstrate a level of controlling interest in the business, e.g. be a sole proprietor or a majority shareholder;
  • demonstrate that such temporary entry will result in the creation or retention of employment opportunities for Canadians and permanent residents and/or skills transfer to Canadians and permanent residents; and,
  • not be able to be dismissed.

Variation: No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: All Provinces

Religion Instructors

Description: The position is for an instructor in a faith-based independent school (Other Religious Occupations, NOC 4217). This variation only applies to situations where the provincial Ministry of Education delegates to the independent school the ability to establish the qualifications of their instructors based on religion.

Variation: Employers must advertise on the national Job Bank (or provincial equivalent), or conduct similar recruitment activities consistent with the occupation (e.g. advertising in church publications) three months prior to applying for a LMIA.

Applicability: All Provinces

Seasonal Agricultural Workers

Description: The position is for a seasonal agricultural worker who will be working in Quebec under the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP).

Variation: Employers must conduct their recruitment efforts as described under Temporary Work Permits for Work in Quebec.

Applicability: Quebec only

Specialized Service Technicians/Specialized Service Providers

Descriptions: When the work requires a specialist having proprietary knowledge and/or experience related to the work to be performed, the duration of the work is limited, and there is no opportunity for Canadians to be trained.

Situations to which this variation could apply include (but are not limited to):

  • Service required for equipment manufactured outside of Canada and the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) does not have Canadian licensees that can do the work (equipment is generally no longer under warranty, or covered by an after sales agreement); or
  • The work to be performed requires someone currently unavailable in Canada, with proprietary knowledge, experience and/or tools from the OEM (or an approved OEM licensee) to perform the work or to oversee and direct Canadians doing the work; or
  • Service required for equipment that is so old (no longer in production) that customized parts have to be manufactured / or new parts reconfigured by an OEM approved technician / representative.

Variation: No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: All Provinces

Warranty Work

Description: When the work entails installation, inspection or repair of equipment, and the terms of the warranty require the work to be done by skilled workers designated by the manufacturer.

Variation: No advertising or recruitment is required.

Applicability: All Provinces

Don’t let a simple advertisement trip up your recruitment process.

Work with CIP to ensure you’re meeting all of your requirements and obligations under LMIA. Every day, we help employers navigate the maze of requirements and regulations that are required in order to bring a foreign worker into the fold. Contact CIP if you’ve got vacancies you’ve got to fill ASAP.

Canada Foreign Skilled Worker Immigration Program

Canada Skilled Worker Program

One of the main goals of Canada skilled worker program is to motivate foreign skilled workers and professionals who will contribute to Canada’s growing economy. Skilled workers and professionals are greatly needed in Canada.

Federal Skilled Worker applications are assessed based on an applicant’s ability to become economically established upon immigration to Canada. Successful applicants of the Canada Skilled Worker Immigration programs will receive a Canadian Immigration (permanent resident) Visa, allowing the applicant to immigrate to Canada with his or her family.

As a skilled worker or professional, you have several options to consider. For example, you may be eligible to apply under Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker Class or, if your intended destination is in Quebec, the Quebec Skilled Worker Program may be the pathway for you and your family, if applicable. Moreover, if you know in which province or territory you plan to reside, you may be able to submit an application through one of the Provincial Nominee Programs.

As of January 1, 2015, Federal Skilled Worker applications are being processed through the Express Entry System Selection System. Express Entry is a selection system for Canadian immigration, designed to select skilled workers for immigration to Canada. CLICK & READ: Express Entry is a completely electronic process involving the federal government, provincial governments, and Canadian employers. Candidates eligible under the Federal Skilled Worker Class must first make an expression of interest in immigrating to Canada by creating an online Express Entry profile.

Below, you will find the links to those programs for you to explore.

Six selection factors – Federal Skilled Worker Program (Express Entry)

IRCC (or “we” for the remainder of this page) uses selection factor points to help assess your eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

IRCC will assess your selection factors and assign an overall score out of 100.

If you score 67 points or higher, you may qualify for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

If you meet the other requirements too, you can submit a profile to the Express Entry pool. Once you’re in the Express Entry pool, we use a different system to rank your profile.

If you score lower than 67 points, you won’t qualify for the program. You may be able to get a higher score by doing things like:

  • improving your language skills
  • completing another degree, diploma, or certificate
  • receiving an offer of arranged employment in Canada

Language skills (maximum 28 points)

It’s very important to be able to communicate in 1 or both of Canada’s official languages. Knowing English, French or both helps you in the Canadian job market.

You can get up to 28 points for your language skills in English and French. We’ll give you points based on your ability to:

  • write
  • read
  • listen
  • speak

Language testing

You must take an approved language test to prove your language levels.

To measure your English or French levels, we use:

You must get a minimum level of CLB 7 or NCLC 7 for 1 official language in all 4 language areas. To get points for the second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5 or NCLC 5 in all 4 language areas.

Once you take the language test, you can use it to see exactly how many points we’ll give you for the language selection factor.

Find out more about language testing and how to get tested.

Calculate your language points

First official language (maximum 24 points)

Check the table below and add the points that match your skill level:

CLB level in ‘second official language’ Points
Points

First official language Speaking Listening Reading Writing
CLB level 9 or higher 6 6 6 6
CLB level 8 5 5 5 5
CLB level 7 4 4 4 4
Below CLB level 7 Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply

Second official language (maximum 4 points)

You can get 4 points only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the 4 language abilities.

Second official language Points
At least CLB 5 in all of the 4 abilities 4
CLB 4 or less in any of the 4 abilities

Education (maximum 25 points)

If you went to school in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:

  • secondary (high school) or
  • post-secondary school

If you have foreign education, you must have:

  • an Educational Credential Assessment report from an approved agency showing that your foreign education is equal to a completed certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:
    • secondary (high school) or
    • post-secondary school

You must include your Canadian credential or your foreign credential and Educational Credential Assessment report when you apply.

  • How to read your report and calculate your points for education

Work experience (maximum 15 points)

You can get points for the number of years you’ve spent doing full-time paid work (at least 30 hours per week, or an equal amount of part-time [15 hours per week for 24 months]) at skill type 0, or skill levels A or B of the 2020 National Occupational Classification.


To get selection factor points, your work experience will count if it was:

  • in Canada or abroad
  • while you were studying
  • while being self-employed

Finding your National Occupational Classification (NOC)

The NOC is a list of all the occupations in the Canadian labour market and is used to classify jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for different jobs.

You will need to identify the “NOC code” for each job that you want to include in your Express Entry profile. Find your NOC to find the information that best matches each of your past jobs.

You’ll need this information again, so make sure to save it.

If the description and list of main duties match what you did at your job(s), you can count this experience for points.

Use this chart to find the number of points based on your number of years of experience.

Experience Maximum 15 points
1 year 9
2-3 years 11
4-5 years 13
6 or more years 15

Age (maximum 12 points)

You’ll get points based on your age on the day we get your application.

Age Points
Under 18
18-35 12
36 11
37 10
38 9
39 8
40 7
41 6
42 5
43 4
44 3
45 2
46 1
47 and older

Arranged employment in Canada (maximum 10 points)

You can get points if you have a job offer of at least 1 year from a Canadian employer. You must get the job offer before you apply to come to Canada as a Federal Skilled Worker.

  • for continuous, paid, full-time work (minimum of 30 hours/week) that is:
    • not seasonal
    • for at least 1 year
  • in an occupation listed as Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC.

We must be convinced that:

  • you’re able to do the job offered to you
  • you’ll be able to become licensed or certified when in Canada (if the occupation is regulated in Canada)

To get 10 points for a valid job offer, 1 of these situations must also apply.

Situation 1

You currently work in Canada on a work permit and you meet all of the following conditions:

    Your work permit is val >Situation 2

You currently work in Canada in a job that is exempt from the LMIA requirement because of 1 of the following:

  • an international agreement (such as, the North American Free Trade Agreement) or
  • significant benefit to Canadian interests or
  • a federal-provincial agreement

You must also meet all of the following conditions:

    Your work permit is val >Situation 3

You must meet all of the following conditions:

    You currently don’t have a work permit, or don’t plan to work in Canada before you get a permanent res >Situation 4

You must meet all of the following conditions:

    You have a val >LMIAs and valid job offers

  • You can’t get a LMIA (your employer must do this for you).
  • Employment and Social Development Canada will only confirm val >Adaptability (maximum 10 points)

You and your spouse or common-law partner who will immigrate with you to Canada can earn points for adaptability.

You and your spouse can earn a maximum of 10 points by combining any of the elements below. These elements assess how well you and your spouse are likely to settle in Canada.

Adaptability Maximum 10 points
Your spouse or partner’s language levelYour spouse or common-law partner has a language level in either English or French at CLB 4 level or higher in all 4 language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

To get these points, you must submit your spouse or common-law partner’s test results from an approved agency when you apply. The language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

5 Your past studies in CanadaYou completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5 Your spouse or partner’s past studies in CanadaYour spouse or common-law partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and your spouse or partner must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5 Your past work in CanadaYou did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada:

  1. In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  2. And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada.
10 Your spouse or common-law partner’s past work in CanadaYour spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada. 5 Arranged employment in CanadaYou earned points for having arranged employment. 5 Relatives in CanadaYou, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is:

  • living in Canada
  • 18 years or older and
  • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident

This relative must be a:

  • parent
  • grandparent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent)
  • your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage)
  • your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent)
5

The following table represents the government of Canada’s Multi-Year Immigration Plan beginning 2020 and ending in 2020. This table includes a comparison with 2020 targets.

To find out if you are eligible for one of these Canadian immigration programs, please fill out a free assessment form.

Category Immigration Program 2020 Target 2020 2020 2020 Percentage change, 2020 to 2020
Economic Programs Range Target Range Target Range Target
FSW, FST, CEC 71,700 72,700-78,200 74,900 76,000- 83,000 81,400 81,000-88,000 85,800 +19.66%
Atlantic Pilot Program 2,000 500- 2,000 1,000 1,000-4,000 2,000 2,000-4,000 4,000 +100%
Caregivers 18,000 15,000-20,000 17,000 9,500-15,500 14,000 4,000-7,000 5,000 -72.22%
Business 500 500-1,000 700 500-1,500 700 500-1,500 700 +40%
Provincial Nominee Programs 51,000 53,000-57,400 55,000 57,000-63,500 61,000 62,000-68,500 67,800 +32.94%
Quebec Skilled Worker Program and Quebec Business 29,300 27,900-29,900 28,900 31,500-33,500 32,500 31,500- 33,500 32,500 +10.92%
All Economic Programs 172,500 169,600188,500 177,500 175,500201,000 191,600 181,000-202,500 195,800 +13.51
Percentage of overall: 57.25% Percentage of overall: 58.06% Percentage of overall: 57.59%
Family Class Programs Spouses, Partners and Dependent Children 64,000 64,000-68,000 66,000 64,000- 70,000 68,000 64,000-74,000 70,000 +9.37%
Parents and Grandparents 20,000 17,000-21,000 20,000 18,000-21,000 20,500 18,000-22,000 21,000 +5%
All Family Class Programs 84,000 81,00089,000 86,000 82,00091,000 88,500 82,00096,000 91,000 +8.3%
Percentage of overall: 27.74% Percentage of overall: 26.81% Percentage of overall: 26.77%
Refugees and Protected Persons Protected Persons in Canada and Dependents Abroad 7,500 13,500-17,000 16,000 14,000- 20,000 16,500 16,000-20,000 17,000 +126.67%
Privately-Sponsored Refugees 16,000 16,000-20,000 18,000 17,000-21,000 19,000 18,000-23,000 20,000 +25%
Blended Visa Office Referred 1,500 1,000-3,000 1,500 1,000-3,000 1,650 1,000-3,000 1,700 +13.33%
Government-Assisted Refugees 15,000 6,000-8,000 7,500 7,000-9,000 8,500 8,500-10,500 10,000 -33.33%
All Refugees and Protected Persons 40,000 36,50048,000 43,000 39,00053,000 45,650 43,50056,500 48,700 +21.75%
Percentage of overall: 13.87% Percentage of overall: 13.83% Percentage of overall: 14.32 %
Humanitarian and Other All Humanitarian and Other 3,500 2,9004,500 3,500 3,5005,000 4,250 3,5005,000 4,500 +28.57%
Percentage of overall: 1.13% Percentage of overall: 1.29% Percentage of overall: 1.32%
Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020: 310,000 Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020:

Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020:

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Duties and employment requirements of chemical technicians and chemical technologists

Read about main duties and employment requirements of chemical technicians and chemical technologists and say what duties you do perform as students of the faculty of Chemistry. Tell what employment requirements concerning your future job you are to meet.

Chemical technologistsand techniciansprovide technical support and services or may work independently in chemical engineering, chemical and biochemical research and analysis, industrial chemistry, chemical quality control and environmental protection. They are employed by research and development and quality control laboratories, consulting engineering companies, in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical and a variety of other manufacturing and processing industries and by utilities, health, education and government establishments.

There is a great deal of professional titles according to the branch or even the direction of either science or industry: analytical technician, chemical analyst, biochemistry technologist, chemical engineering technologist, chemical laboratory analyst, chemical laboratory analyst, chemical research technician, food technologist, food technologist, geochemical technician, industrial hygiene technologist, mass spectrometer technician, master dyer – textiles, paint technician, quality control technician — chemical processing, quality control technician — food processing and so on.

Chemical technologistsperform some or all of the following duties:

• Set up and conduct chemical experiments, tests and analyses using techniques such as chromatography, spectroscopy, physical and chemical separation techniques and microscopy

• Operate and maintain laboratory equipment and apparatus and prepare solutions of gas or liquid, reagents and sample formulations

• Compile records and interpret experimental or analytical results

• Develop and conduct programs of sampling and analysis to maintain quality standards of raw materials, chemical intermediates and products

• Assist in the development of chemical engineering processes, studies of chemicalengineering procurement, construction, inspection and maintenance and the development of standards, procedure and health and safety measures

• Operate experimental chemical or petrochemical pilot plants

• Conduct or assist in air and water quality testing and assessments, environmental monitoring and protection activities and development of and compliance with standards

• Assist in synthesis of small molecules for the purpose of creating drug candidates

•Assist in the design and fabrication of experimental apparatus

Chemical techniciansperform some or all of the following duties:

• Assist in setting up and conducting chemical experiments, tests and analyses

• Operate and maintain laboratory equipment and apparatus and prepare solutions of gas and liquid, reagents and sample formulations


• Compile records for analytical studies

• Assist in developing and conducting programs of sampling and analysis to maintain quality standards

• Carry out a limited range of other technical functions in support of chemical research, tests and analyses, and environmental air and water quality monitoring and protection

• Assist in the design and fabrication of experimental apparatus.

• Employment requirements vary from country to country. See what they are in Canada.

• Chemical technologists usually require completion of a two- or three-year college program in chemical, biochemical or chemical engineering technology or a closely related discipline.

• Chemical technicians usually require completion of a one- or two-year college program in chemical, biochemical or chemical engineering technology.

• National certification for chemical technologists and technicians is available through the Canadian Society for Chemical Technology.

• Certification in chemical engineering technology or in a related field is available through provincial associations of engineering/applied science technologists and technicians and may be required by employers.

• In province of Quebec, Canada; membership in the regulatory body is required to use the title of Professional Technologist.

• A period of supervised work experience, usually two years, is required before certification.

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Canada Foreign Skilled Worker Immigration Program

Canada Skilled Worker Program

One of the main goals of Canada skilled worker program is to motivate foreign skilled workers and professionals who will contribute to Canada’s growing economy. Skilled workers and professionals are greatly needed in Canada.

Federal Skilled Worker applications are assessed based on an applicant’s ability to become economically established upon immigration to Canada. Successful applicants of the Canada Skilled Worker Immigration programs will receive a Canadian Immigration (permanent resident) Visa, allowing the applicant to immigrate to Canada with his or her family.

As a skilled worker or professional, you have several options to consider. For example, you may be eligible to apply under Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker Class or, if your intended destination is in Quebec, the Quebec Skilled Worker Program may be the pathway for you and your family, if applicable. Moreover, if you know in which province or territory you plan to reside, you may be able to submit an application through one of the Provincial Nominee Programs.

As of January 1, 2015, Federal Skilled Worker applications are being processed through the Express Entry System Selection System. Express Entry is a selection system for Canadian immigration, designed to select skilled workers for immigration to Canada. CLICK & READ: Express Entry is a completely electronic process involving the federal government, provincial governments, and Canadian employers. Candidates eligible under the Federal Skilled Worker Class must first make an expression of interest in immigrating to Canada by creating an online Express Entry profile.

Below, you will find the links to those programs for you to explore.

Six selection factors – Federal Skilled Worker Program (Express Entry)

IRCC (or “we” for the remainder of this page) uses selection factor points to help assess your eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

IRCC will assess your selection factors and assign an overall score out of 100.

If you score 67 points or higher, you may qualify for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

If you meet the other requirements too, you can submit a profile to the Express Entry pool. Once you’re in the Express Entry pool, we use a different system to rank your profile.

If you score lower than 67 points, you won’t qualify for the program. You may be able to get a higher score by doing things like:

  • improving your language skills
  • completing another degree, diploma, or certificate
  • receiving an offer of arranged employment in Canada

Language skills (maximum 28 points)

It’s very important to be able to communicate in 1 or both of Canada’s official languages. Knowing English, French or both helps you in the Canadian job market.

You can get up to 28 points for your language skills in English and French. We’ll give you points based on your ability to:

  • write
  • read
  • listen
  • speak

Language testing

You must take an approved language test to prove your language levels.

To measure your English or French levels, we use:

You must get a minimum level of CLB 7 or NCLC 7 for 1 official language in all 4 language areas. To get points for the second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5 or NCLC 5 in all 4 language areas.

Once you take the language test, you can use it to see exactly how many points we’ll give you for the language selection factor.

Find out more about language testing and how to get tested.

Calculate your language points

First official language (maximum 24 points)

Check the table below and add the points that match your skill level:

Points

First official language Speaking Listening Reading Writing
CLB level 9 or higher 6 6 6 6
CLB level 8 5 5 5 5
CLB level 7 4 4 4 4
Below CLB level 7 Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply

Second official language (maximum 4 points)

You can get 4 points only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the 4 language abilities.

Second official language Points
At least CLB 5 in all of the 4 abilities 4
CLB 4 or less in any of the 4 abilities

Education (maximum 25 points)

If you went to school in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:

  • secondary (high school) or
  • post-secondary school

If you have foreign education, you must have:

  • an Educational Credential Assessment report from an approved agency showing that your foreign education is equal to a completed certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:
    • secondary (high school) or
    • post-secondary school

You must include your Canadian credential or your foreign credential and Educational Credential Assessment report when you apply.

  • How to read your report and calculate your points for education

Work experience (maximum 15 points)

You can get points for the number of years you’ve spent doing full-time paid work (at least 30 hours per week, or an equal amount of part-time [15 hours per week for 24 months]) at skill type 0, or skill levels A or B of the 2020 National Occupational Classification.

To get selection factor points, your work experience will count if it was:

  • in Canada or abroad
  • while you were studying
  • while being self-employed

Finding your National Occupational Classification (NOC)

The NOC is a list of all the occupations in the Canadian labour market and is used to classify jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for different jobs.

You will need to identify the “NOC code” for each job that you want to include in your Express Entry profile. Find your NOC to find the information that best matches each of your past jobs.

You’ll need this information again, so make sure to save it.

If the description and list of main duties match what you did at your job(s), you can count this experience for points.

Use this chart to find the number of points based on your number of years of experience.

Experience Maximum 15 points
1 year 9
2-3 years 11
4-5 years 13
6 or more years 15

Age (maximum 12 points)

You’ll get points based on your age on the day we get your application.

Age Points
Under 18
18-35 12
36 11
37 10
38 9
39 8
40 7
41 6
42 5
43 4
44 3
45 2
46 1
47 and older

Arranged employment in Canada (maximum 10 points)

You can get points if you have a job offer of at least 1 year from a Canadian employer. You must get the job offer before you apply to come to Canada as a Federal Skilled Worker.

  • for continuous, paid, full-time work (minimum of 30 hours/week) that is:
    • not seasonal
    • for at least 1 year
  • in an occupation listed as Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC.

We must be convinced that:

  • you’re able to do the job offered to you
  • you’ll be able to become licensed or certified when in Canada (if the occupation is regulated in Canada)

To get 10 points for a valid job offer, 1 of these situations must also apply.

Situation 1

You currently work in Canada on a work permit and you meet all of the following conditions:

    Your work permit is val >Situation 2

You currently work in Canada in a job that is exempt from the LMIA requirement because of 1 of the following:

  • an international agreement (such as, the North American Free Trade Agreement) or
  • significant benefit to Canadian interests or
  • a federal-provincial agreement

You must also meet all of the following conditions:

    Your work permit is val >Situation 3

You must meet all of the following conditions:

    You currently don’t have a work permit, or don’t plan to work in Canada before you get a permanent res >Situation 4

You must meet all of the following conditions:

    You have a val >LMIAs and valid job offers

  • You can’t get a LMIA (your employer must do this for you).
  • Employment and Social Development Canada will only confirm val >Adaptability (maximum 10 points)

You and your spouse or common-law partner who will immigrate with you to Canada can earn points for adaptability.

You and your spouse can earn a maximum of 10 points by combining any of the elements below. These elements assess how well you and your spouse are likely to settle in Canada.

Adaptability Maximum 10 points
Your spouse or partner’s language levelYour spouse or common-law partner has a language level in either English or French at CLB 4 level or higher in all 4 language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

To get these points, you must submit your spouse or common-law partner’s test results from an approved agency when you apply. The language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

5 Your past studies in CanadaYou completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5 Your spouse or partner’s past studies in CanadaYour spouse or common-law partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and your spouse or partner must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5 Your past work in CanadaYou did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada:

  1. In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  2. And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada.
10 Your spouse or common-law partner’s past work in CanadaYour spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada. 5 Arranged employment in CanadaYou earned points for having arranged employment. 5 Relatives in CanadaYou, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is:

  • living in Canada
  • 18 years or older and
  • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident

This relative must be a:

  • parent
  • grandparent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent)
  • your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage)
  • your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent)
5

The following table represents the government of Canada’s Multi-Year Immigration Plan beginning 2020 and ending in 2020. This table includes a comparison with 2020 targets.

To find out if you are eligible for one of these Canadian immigration programs, please fill out a free assessment form.

Category Immigration Program 2020 Target 2020 2020 2020 Percentage change, 2020 to 2020
Economic Programs Range Target Range Target Range Target
FSW, FST, CEC 71,700 72,700-78,200 74,900 76,000- 83,000 81,400 81,000-88,000 85,800 +19.66%
Atlantic Pilot Program 2,000 500- 2,000 1,000 1,000-4,000 2,000 2,000-4,000 4,000 +100%
Caregivers 18,000 15,000-20,000 17,000 9,500-15,500 14,000 4,000-7,000 5,000 -72.22%
Business 500 500-1,000 700 500-1,500 700 500-1,500 700 +40%
Provincial Nominee Programs 51,000 53,000-57,400 55,000 57,000-63,500 61,000 62,000-68,500 67,800 +32.94%
Quebec Skilled Worker Program and Quebec Business 29,300 27,900-29,900 28,900 31,500-33,500 32,500 31,500- 33,500 32,500 +10.92%
All Economic Programs 172,500 169,600188,500 177,500 175,500201,000 191,600 181,000-202,500 195,800 +13.51
Percentage of overall: 57.25% Percentage of overall: 58.06% Percentage of overall: 57.59%
Family Class Programs Spouses, Partners and Dependent Children 64,000 64,000-68,000 66,000 64,000- 70,000 68,000 64,000-74,000 70,000 +9.37%
Parents and Grandparents 20,000 17,000-21,000 20,000 18,000-21,000 20,500 18,000-22,000 21,000 +5%
All Family Class Programs 84,000 81,00089,000 86,000 82,00091,000 88,500 82,00096,000 91,000 +8.3%
Percentage of overall: 27.74% Percentage of overall: 26.81% Percentage of overall: 26.77%
Refugees and Protected Persons Protected Persons in Canada and Dependents Abroad 7,500 13,500-17,000 16,000 14,000- 20,000 16,500 16,000-20,000 17,000 +126.67%
Privately-Sponsored Refugees 16,000 16,000-20,000 18,000 17,000-21,000 19,000 18,000-23,000 20,000 +25%
Blended Visa Office Referred 1,500 1,000-3,000 1,500 1,000-3,000 1,650 1,000-3,000 1,700 +13.33%
Government-Assisted Refugees 15,000 6,000-8,000 7,500 7,000-9,000 8,500 8,500-10,500 10,000 -33.33%
All Refugees and Protected Persons 40,000 36,50048,000 43,000 39,00053,000 45,650 43,50056,500 48,700 +21.75%
Percentage of overall: 13.87% Percentage of overall: 13.83% Percentage of overall: 14.32 %
Humanitarian and Other All Humanitarian and Other 3,500 2,9004,500 3,500 3,5005,000 4,250 3,5005,000 4,500 +28.57%
Percentage of overall: 1.13% Percentage of overall: 1.29% Percentage of overall: 1.32%
Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020: 310,000 Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020:

Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020:

4156 Employment Counsellors

  • « Return To Express Entry Occupation List
    • 415 Social And Community Service Professionals
      • » 4151 Psychologists
      • » 4152 Social workers
      • » 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors
      • » 4154 Professional occupations in religion
      • » 4155 Probation and parole officers and related occupations

4156 — Employment Counsellors

Employment counsellors provide assistance and information to job seeker clients on all aspects of employment search and career planning. They also provide advice and information to employer clients regarding employment issues and human resources. Employment counsellors are employed by human resource departments of establishments, employment service organizations, consulting firms, correctional facilities and by federal and provincial governments. Supervisors of employment counsellors are included in this unit group.

  • Illustrative example(s)
    • career counsellor — except education
    • career development counsellor
    • employment counsellor
    • outplacement counsellor
    • relocation consultant
    • relocation counselor
  • All Examples
  • Aboriginal employment developer
  • Aboriginal employment officer
  • Aboriginal employment worker
  • career coach
  • career counsellor — except education
  • career development counsellor
  • career development facilitator
  • career development practitioner
  • career group facilitator
  • career resource centre co-ordinator
  • counsellor, employment
  • counsellor, employment — government services
  • counsellor, employment group
  • counsellor, job
  • counsellor, job — government services
  • counsellor, outplacement
  • counsellor, relocation
  • employment consultant
  • employment counsellor
  • employment counsellor — government services
  • employment group counsellor
  • employment outreach counsellor
  • employment outreach program co-ordinator
  • employment outreach program counsellor
  • employment services assessment officer
  • employment services officer
  • group counsellor, employment services
  • job counsellor
  • job counsellor — government services
  • job search trainer
  • labour market information consultant
  • outplacement consultant
  • outplacement counsellor
  • outreach counsellor, employment
  • outreach program co-ordinator, employment
  • outreach program counsellor, employment
  • relocation consultant
  • relocation counsellor
  • workforce adjustment officer
  • workforce development officer
  • Exclusion(s)
    • Educational counsellors (4033)
    • Employment insurance officers (See 1228 Employment insurance, immigration, border services and revenue officers)
    • Human resources and recruitment officers (1223)
    • Job coaches for persons with disabilities (See 4215 Instructors of persons with disabilities)
    • Vocational rehabilitation counsellors (See 4153 Family, marriage and other related counsellors)
  • Main duties

Employment counsellors perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Interview clients to obtain employment history, educational background and career goals
  • Identify barriers to employment and assist clients with such matters as job readiness skills, job search strategies, writing résumés and preparing for job interviews
  • Assess need for assistance such as rehabilitation, financial aid or further training and refer clients to the appropriate services
  • Provide established workers with information and strategies for maintaining a job or moving within an organization, dealing with job dissatisfaction, making mid-career changes and adjusting to workplace transitions
  • Collect labour market information for clients regarding job openings, entry and skill requirements and other occupational information
  • Advise employers on human resource and other employment-related issues
  • Provide consulting services to community groups and agencies, businesses, industry and other organizations involved in providing community-based career planning support or resources
  • May administer and interpret tests designed to determine the interests, aptitudes and abilities of clients.
  • Employment requirements
    • A bachelor’s degree or college diploma in employment counselling, career development or in a related field, such as human resources development, psychology, education or social services is required.
    • A master’s degree in counselling psychology or a related field such as educational psychology, developmental psychology or social work may be required.
    • In Quebec, membership in a professional association is mandatory to use the title »counsellor».
  • Additional information
    • Mobility to positions in personnel or training is possible.
    • Progression to supervisory positions is possible through experience.

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