Make Ontario Great Again Канада


Make Ontario Great Again Канада

A deer runs close to the United States border with Canada near Havre, Montana, November 20, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Something strange is happening.

As a Canadian who has lived and worked in the United States for more than 15 years, I’ve always felt like a bit of an outsider, with my strangely pronounced words and a deep knowledge of maple syrup.

But with Donald Trump’s commanding lead in delegates and polls for the Republican presidential nomination, I’m finding that a new dynamic is developing: Americans are coming up to me, shyly and sweetly, and asking how exactly to get out.

In classroom terms, it’s as if the quirky nerd in the corner suddenly became Homecoming King.

When one friend first raised the question, I laughed. After all, people always make these kind of dramatic proclamations during election season.

So I thought she was kidding. She wasn’t.

“I’m 100 percent serious,” she said. “I’m going to wait until around June to see if he’s winning in the polls — and then I’m going to ask you what to do.”

No wonder Google data editor Simon Rogers reported that, as Super Tuesday results rolled in, searches for “How can I move to Canada” spiked by 350 percent in just a few hours (later rising by more than 1,000 percent).

The prospect of a Trump-branded White House truly scares some people. Enough to make them actually consider a frosty future north of the 49th parallel, filled with hockey pucks, Tim Horton’s coffee and Montreal bagels.

Some of my Canadian compatriots in the United States are even foreseeing some ripe romantic possibilities. One New York City lawyer I know has just seen her value on the dating market skyrocket – she has a Canadian passport and can move back to Vancouver whenever she wants.

As such, she is willing to consider the right American gentleman. But rest assured: The standards just got raised.

“For the right offer, I will consider giving my hand in marriage to a smart, funny, catch of an American man looking to flee to Canada,” she said, tongue-in-cheek. “And by the right offer, I mean we need to fall in love. We’d better get started.”

An added bonus: The country’s immigration minister recently said he is planning a new policy of offering permanent residency status to all spouses of Canadians, immediately upon arrival.

Other Canuck friends are noticing the trend, too. One recently attended a literary conference in Arizona. A hot topic among attendees? “Moving to Canada if Trump got elected,” she marvels. “Republicans didn’t like him any better than Democrats!”

It should be noted, though: My American friends seem to assume, because of my mere Canadian-ness, that I somehow hold magic keys to the country, and can open doors for them. They envision simply walking through those doors, and then skating happily along Ottawa’s Rideau Canal with Justin Trudeau and a piping mug of hot chocolate.

So let me be clear: I do not run the immigration department. I don’t know Justin. I am a freelance writer who lives in Brooklyn with a beagle.

There is a process — a path to citizenship, one might say — just as there is in America, involving countless forms and background checks and waiting periods. (Memo to self: Perhaps build a wall?)

As Trump continues to rack up more states, Canadians are starting to sense the rising panic south of the border. One Nova Scotian even did some expert trolling on social media recently, inviting those frightened of a Trump future to come start a new life in Cape Breton (http://cbiftrumpwins.com/).

But for my frantic American friends, I did feel it was my moral obligation to ask the Canadian government whether these masses of Trump refugees could get some special dispensation, and move to the front of the line.

Sorry, hosers — no dice. “All applicants who apply to Canada’s immigration programs are treated equally no matter where they are from,” a government spokesman replied dryly, pointing potential applicants to the “Come to Canada” website.

Anyway, maybe none of this shall come to pass. Maybe Trump will lose the election and return to “Celebrity Apprentice” to fire Dennis Rodman or Gary Busey, and we can all go back to our regularly scheduled programming.

Trump Is Making Canada Great Again

While America closes its borders, its northern neighbor is poaching some of the best tech talent in the world.

By RICHARD FLORIDA and JOSHUA GANS

October 01, 2020

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Richard Florida is university professor and director of cities at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management; distinguished visiting fellow at New York University’s Shack Institute of Real Estate; and co-founder and editor-at-large of the Atlantic’s CityLab.

Joshua Gans is professor of strategic management and Jeffrey S. Skoll chair in technical innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

It’s no secret that the United States has long dominated cutting-edge technologies, from personal computers and biotech to smartphones and social media. One big reason: America’s track record of attracting global talent, like the Scottish-born steel magnate Andrew Carnegie or the Hungarian-born Andrew Grove, a pioneer in the semiconductor industry, or, more recently, Google’s Sergey Brin—and many other entrepreneurs in between and afterward.

But that edge may be disappearing thanks to the new president. Just eight months into office, President Donald Trump has moved to cut legal immigration by half over the next decade, increase security along the border, build a wall with Mexico, ban travel indefinitely from several countries and overturn DACA, the Obama-era policy that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as minors. The Trump administration has also suggested limiting “startup visas” for high-tech entrepreneurs entering the United States, and massively cutting America’s funding for scientific research. Trump’s aggressive “America first” posture on trade and international diplomacy has transformed the United States into something of a pariah nation, out of touch with the basic norms and values of advanced democracies.

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Trump might see these proposals as part of his core political agenda to prioritize Americans and their jobs, and make the United States “great again.” But, while America turns inward, another country stands to benefit: Canada.

Why? It’s not just that Canada has opened centers for refugees streaming over the border from the United States, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau personally welcoming some of them to the country. Canada is specifically recruiting the skilled, ambitious talent that drives innovation and economic growth, including top thinkers and workers in technology and industry. Canadian universities—which rank among the world’s best in fields like computer science, electrical and computer engineering, and artificial intelligence—are aggressively recruiting foreign students, who in turn are matriculating in Canada at higher levels than before Trump’s election. And Canadian cities—particularly Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal, which rate among the best places in the world to live—are attracting more venture capital to fund the tech industry, on par with American tech hubs like Seattle and Austin.

As America closes its borders, Canada is playing the longer, smarter game.

It’s not alone in this regard, but Canada, more than any other place, is uniquely positioned to benefit from Trump’s anti-immigrant posture. The United Kingdom also hosts a large number of immigrants; yet it has seen a populist backlash of its own, and London has been plagued by terrorism, growing inequality and unaffordable housing, which make it a more difficult place for immigrants to settle. Australia and New Zealand also attract their fair share of immigrants, but they are geographically more remote, and they do not provide proximity to the large U.S. market, as Canada’s major cities do.

The truth is that if Trump really wants to put America first, he’s doing it all wrong. If he keeps up his anti-immigration push, the United States’ polite neighbor to the north could soon be eating Americans’ lunch.

It’s hard to overstate the role that foreign-born talent plays, and has long played, in America’s leadership and economic competitiveness in the fields of science and tech. For much of its history, the United States was the most open and welcoming country in the world, with the best universities and the most vibrant industries and opportunities—the place global talent wanted, and needed, to be. As of 2013, foreign-born workers in STEM fields—science, technology engineering and math—accounted for nearly a fifth of workers with bachelor’s degrees in the United States, 40 percent of those with master’s degrees and more than half of those with Ph.D.s. In the San Jose metro area, consisting largely of Silicon Valley, immigrants comprise more than 55 percent of adults who hold advanced degrees. In Los Angeles and San Francisco, immigrants make up roughly a third of all advanced degree holders. In Seattle and Washington, D.C., it’s about a quarter. And in Boston, immigrants make up 20 percent of all those with graduate degrees. As of 2012, immigrants also served as founders of a quarter of all U.S. companies and more than 40 percent of tech startups in Silicon Valley.

While Trump’s “America first” posture and moves to restrict immigration are damaging America’s ability to attract talent, the United States has been facing increased competition for such talent in recent years. America has fallen behind other nations in terms of its overall share of foreign-born residents, with immigrants making up roughly 13 percent of the U.S. population as of 2013, compared with 20 percent for Canada and almost 30 percent for Switzerland and Australia. This is largely a matter of other countries becoming more open to immigrants and, in particular, getting better at attracting more highly skilled and educated foreigners.

In that, Canada has excelled. Its immigration system is a points-based system that rates immigrants on their education, skills and work experience, as well as family relationships and community ties. (A bill Trump is backing to cut legal immigration to the United States would use a similar points system to prioritize immigrants.) Over the summer, Canada launched an additional fast-track visa program for high-skilled workers. In Canada, immigrants today comprise about a third of all adults with a university degree. Canada’s foreign-born residents are particularly versed in science, technology, engineering and math, making up about half of the nation’s STEM degrees. Immigrants also comprise about 60 percent of Canada’s engineering degrees, 56 percent of its math and computer science degrees, and 40 percent of its science and technology degrees—higher percentages than the United States.

Just as American universities like Stanford and MIT have functioned as the Ellis Islands of the knowledge age for the United States, Canada’s universities now play a key role in attracting foreign talent to the country. Between 2008 and 2015, the number of international students in Canada nearly doubled—from roughly 185,000 to more than 350,000. Today, foreign-students already make up a substantially larger percentage of students at Canadian versus U.S. universities—20 percent of all students at Canadian universities compared with less than 5 percent in the United States. Canadian immigration law also makes it much easier for foreign students to remain in Canada after they graduate, so they are able to make a more direct and lasting contribution to the Canadian economy.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the number of foreign students applying to Canadian universities has spiked substantially since Trump was elected. At the University of Toronto, where we both teach, international student applications jumped by 70 percent in fall 2020, compared with the previous year. In the weeks following the 2020 election, foreign student applications to McGill University in Montreal jumped by 30 percent, while those to the University of British Columbia in Vancouver increased by more than 25 percent, compared with the same time a year earlier.

Meanwhile, Canada’s tech industry is beginning to challenge America’s for talent, especially in the fields of artificial intelligence and machine learning, which promise to revolutionize the way we live and work in coming decades. Not a single one of the six leading scientists and technologists in these fields was born in the United States, and only two are currently based there. Three are from the UK, two are from France, one is from China and another two are based in Canada. One of these Canadian scientists, the University of Toronto’s Geoffrey Hinton, is perhaps the leading figure in the entire field. Hinton left the United States for Canada during the 1980s for political reasons—he did not want his research funded by the American military. In the years since, Google has followed Hinton and built a lab for him in Toronto. Another leading deep-learning researcher, Yoshua Bengio, is a French immigrant to Canada and a professor at the University of Montreal. Microsoft recently established a new research facility in that city to be close to him. Google also established a major AI research facility in Edmonton to be close to the University of Alberta’s Rich Sutton, another Canadian superstar. And in May, Uber announced it was setting up its Advanced Technologies Group in Toronto to be close to the University of Toronto’s Raquel Urtasun, a Spanish immigrant who is one of the world leaders in getting machines to see and understand the environment around them—a key technology used in driverless vehicles.

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Canada’s large cities and metropolitan areas are diverse, cosmopolitan places that stack up well against their American peers in the global competition for talent. Immigrants make up 45 percent of Greater Toronto’s population and 40 percent of Greater Vancouver’s, compared with more than 35 percent in Silicon Valley and about a third in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Calgary’s share of immigrants is about the same as New York’s, while Montreal’s is about the same as Washington, D.C.’s. Vancouver and Toronto also routinely outdistance American cities on livability, ranking third and fourth respectively on the Economist’s 2020 list of the world’s most livable cities. With excellent public schools and lower urban crime, Canada’s urban centers have a real advantage attracting families that want to live in cities.

And Canada’s large cities are no economic slouches. Toronto ranks seventh among global financial centers—second only to New York in North America—and both Montreal and Vancouver number among the top 20. While they are no match for the leading U.S. tech ecosystems in the Bay Area, New York and Boston yet, several of Canada’s biggest cities are now significantly above the threshold required to attract and hold onto aspiring entrepreneurs and tech companies. Montreal attracted more than $600 million in venture capital in 2020, putting it on par with Dallas and Salt Lake City, while Vancou­ver attracted more than $300 million—on par with Nashville and Portland. In 2020, Toronto and Waterloo combined to attract nearly a billion dollars in venture capital to their startup companies, putting them the same league as Seattle, Washington, D.C., Austin and San Diego. Toronto is now routinely ranked as one of the world’s top tech hubs and a dominant site for tech job growth. In fact, in a July survey conducted by MaRS—an incubator based near the University of Toronto that hosts some 150 startups, along with other tech companies—62 percent of Canadian companies polled said they had noticed an increase in American job applications, particularly after the election. Before undertaking its current, much-ballyhooed search for a second headquarters, Amazon reportedly discussed expanding to Toronto a few years ago; that idea was tabled at the time, but Toronto is now bidding for the spot alongside many American cities.

Other countries have booming tech industries too, but Canada’s leading metros have the benefit of proximity to the United States. Toronto is closer to New York and Boston than Chicago is, and Vancouver is closer to San Francisco and Seattle than Denver. This makes real-time collaboration easier and reduces the barriers to American firms locating facilities in Canada. One can think of Toronto and Montreal as northern extensions of the Boston-New York-Washington corridor, while Vancouver already functions as a key node in the Cascadia mega-region, which encompasses Portland and Seattle. Canada’s large cities, especially Toronto and Vancouver, provide a nearby solution for U.S. tech companies that want to avoid America’s growing immigration restrictions and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Might we have reached an inflection point for America’s long-held dominance in high-tech industry and talent? Can Canada and its major cities benefit from Trumpism and succeed in attracting a growing share of global high-tech talent and industry?

The competition for global talent is a long, hard game. Even if Canadian cities increase their draw of global talent in the short run, America and its leading tech hubs still have many advantages—particularly if Trump and Trumpism are not long-lasting.

Make Canada Great Again P2!

Make Canada Great Again P2!

We return to the glorious democracy of Canada! The Situation is dire, the Nazis advance into Europe covering it in a wave of tyranny. The Prime Minister declares Hitler a despot and has declared war after the invasion of Poland. Germany is trying to end Canada and therefore the world, but we will not let it!

Manpower Problems

Canada may be more powerful then the world(Of course), but it is not more populous. Despite a three year draft, manpower shortages still occur.


Glorious Prime Minister

The Prime Minister gains even more support, as the elections are only four month away. Despite Nazi victory in Poland and a drive towards France, the unity of Canada stays and support is on the way. The people are confident in a conservative government and support them and their military actions.

State of France, 1940

The CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force) sent to France in the summer of 1940 is in full retreat. Despite stopping Nazi advances at the Marne and Somme, pure force of numbers and the fact that the Nazis have more advanced tanks has caused utter defeat in the battle of Verdun and the battle of Calais. These defeats plus french incompetence in the Maginot line has caused Paris to be the new front and an extraction of Anglo-Canadian forces in France.

Canadian Royal Airforce

With France near collapse, the PM takes a full assessment of the situation in Europe. He believes with German land dominance and English naval dominance, there will simply be a stalemate across the English Channel. New air wings are constructed and flown to British airports.

War in the Desert

The Italians attempted a full offensive on the Anglo-Egyptian protectorate. The local British guards and Iraqi forces not only drove them out of Egypt, but also pushed into Libya itself.

Paris in Dispair

Paris has become fully surrounded by the Wehrmacht. Sadly they will find no relief, as all forces have fled the mainland.

Nazi Invasion of Norway

The Nazis have landed 11 divisions in northern Norway. These forces are pushing through the Norwegian country side and are pushing toward Oslo. Can the Nazis be stopped?

Fall of France

Even worse new, France capitulates and a Vichy regime is installed in the south. A few remaining BEF’s take refuge here, hiding in Provence. The PM was right again, as airpower becomes the defining element in the Battle for Brtitan

Operation Nordic Horn

A new offensive is planed. We cannot let the Nazis just steamroll through Europe. Operation Nordic Horn will halt and dispel Nazi soldiers in Norway. We will first form a defensive line, halting Nazi advances. After this we will push through the middle of both lines, split and incircle the Nazi forces. The two continents will reform further north and then push the Nazis out of Europe.

Bulgaria

Bulgaria joins the Axis Powers. This nation will join the fate that Germany will follow soon.

Greek Offensives

Surprising news from the Balkans, the Greeks have been declared upon by Italy but have actually driven them out of Albania! As Greece joins the Allies, British air forces support them in their insurgency.

Yugoslavia

Ideas of using Greece as a safe haven to strike Italy have been extinguished, as Yugoslavia is declared upon by Germany to make way to Greece.

Nordic Horn

The Nordic Horn offensive nearly begins as Canadian troops arrive en masse to Oslo. The Nazis have been halted and now an offensive is prepared. A major push is planed for September 31st

Aircraft Carriers

Our scientists have finally made us able to build our own aircraft carriers. C.A.G (Carrier Air Groups) are constructed and carriers themselves will soon follow!

Yogoslav capitulation

Yugoslavia is overrun my Nazi invaders. Greece is being pushed back as the small country experiences pressure on all sides.

Election Time!

Great victory for the Conservative Party! Our PM and Governor General have been re-elected! We will make further strides to Canada’s greatness!

Nordic Horn Offensive


We have almost completed phase 2 of the Nordic Horn. We will soon fully liberate Norway and dispel the notion that Hitler’s army is invincible.

Nordic Horn Offensive

Current state of the operation form further away

Nordic Horn Offensive Phase 3

Phase 3 begins as the Nazis are pushed even further out of Norway. A few of our troops are sent to the port of Oslo to be ready incase a new front opens.

Nordic Horn Offensive Phase 3

Nazi forces are cut off at Trondheim. The army to the south will become fully destroyed. Norway will no longer have any worry of invasion as this will provide a large memory if Hitler’s mind that he is not that great.

Mediterranean Situation

Great news in North Africa! The Brits have pushed Italy far into Libya and may even capture the entire colony. Sadly, our Greek allies have lost their mainland. Fierce resistance stands to meet the Wehrmacht incase of invasion.

American Intervention

Finally our uncivilized neighbors to the south are enlightened of the horrors that Hitler wants to impose upon the world. The U.S.A have announced the «Pan-American Security Zone of PASZ. This effort will surly help our already distressed shipping as well as help our supply lines. To many tons of surly are sunk of the coast of Norway before arriving in Oslo. Speaking of which, with Nazi defeat in Norway inevitable, more troops are recalled to be held as reserve units incase of a new front.

Canadian Support in North Africa

The British army has been stopped outside of Tripoli. To make sure of Italian defeat in Africa, the Canadian Royal Air Force has been moved to Benghazi to support British efforts in the region.

Canadian Boots in Lybia

In a port near Tripoli, seven veteran Canadian divisions are recalled from Oslo and sent to Libya. They will help to finally take Tripoli, effectively cutting of any Italian reinforcements and supply from the entire region.

Small Assaults on Tripoli

The Canadian forces are able to take small parts of land and come close to encircling Tripoli. To make sure they cannot escape, small assaults on the city preoccupy the forces there.

Tripoli Surrounded

The large city of Tripoli is fully surrounded. The Italians attempt a breakout that is met with absolute failure. These 3 divisions are trapped and will be forced to starve of surrender.

Another Break Out Attempt

The Italians try again to break through. They are of course un successful and are halted. Now undersupplied, the Italian forces are quickly overwhelmed by Canadian forces.

Operation Pizza Dish

With Tripoli and effectively all of North Africa taken, a new plan is drawn up. Operation Pizza Dish will has two main phases. In the first, heavy bombardments and a naval blockade are implemented in Sicily. The island of Malta is retaken as bombs whizz over head. After a month, a two pronged attack will take two port cities on the opposite sides of Sicily. They will then reunite and cut off all Italian forces from Sicily.

Capture of Malta

Malta is easily taken from Italian hands. The leadership and technology of the Italians is laughable. The blockade commences and bombs drop on Palermo

End of Nordic Horn

Operation Nordic Horn is an astounding success! Nazi forces are fully eliminated and the veterans who bravely taught have a parade and national celebration. May 3 will now be known as Horn day to celebrate this amazing feat of Canadian determination.

Phase Two Begins

Whilst the Canadians in the north celebrate, the southern troops have a baptism of fire. Assaults on Messina and Palermo begin as beachheads are secured. Sicily will soon be ours and attacks on Italy may be planed.

Operation Barbarossa

The Nazis begin Operation Barbarossa, the German invasion of the Soviet Union. The Soviets are pushed back in the north but are not close to defeat. This new ally may help in the utter destruction of Germany.


Beachheads Secured

Palermo and other Italian towns are secured in the west. Further east the city of Messina is not taken. Further attacks will be made to fully secure the island.

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Supply issues

The PASZ may expand deep into the Atlantic, but the Mediterranean is fair game for German and Italian Submarines. Tons of shipping are destroyed after passing Gibraltar. Sipping can be redirected into West Africa and then up into Egypt. This will then have to be flown into the Airport of Palermo by transport planes. The extents that we go through for war.

End Assesment

Sicily has been fully captured. Sadly due to our distractions, Italy and Rommel have been able to take most of Egypt. We will have to retake this land next time on Make Canada Great Again!

Who’s going to make Canada great again?

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Answer Wiki

Canada’s already great.

We can ski in the winter, swim in the summer. Most of our roads are in decent shape (I won’t say whose aren’t *cough cough*New Brunswick* cough cough*).

We have huge national parks and huge provincial parks which are gorgeous and easy to access. We have decent universities (and a better educational system than the states… check it out: The Best Education Systems In The World In 2015 Our maths and science ranking is 10! the States are 29th btw), and they are affordable enough that most people who want to attend can do so. If you break your leg, you can go to the hospita.

После объявления результатов выборов в США “упал” сайт об иммиграции в Канаду

Сайт об иммиграции в Канаду с момента, когда стало понятно, что новым президентом США станет Дональд Трамп, работает с перебоями.

Причина в том, что он не выдержал большого наплыва посетителей из США, которые резко решили узнать о тонкостях переезда в Канаду, и “упал” из-за резко возросшего количества запросов. По состоянию на 8:00 по киевскому времени он был недоступен, а спустя несколько часов стал открываться нестабильно и с большими задержками. Сейчас сайт все еще работает с перебоями.

Запросы на тему иммиграции в Канаду 9 ноября резко выросли и в Google: об этом свидетельствуют данные Google Trends. Кроме того, сверхопопулярны запросы об иммиграции в Мексику и об импичменте президента.

Еще с 1 ноября возрос интерес американцев к переезду в Новую Зеландию. Об этом сообщает Reuters: за неделю на сайт, который занимается визами и вопросами иммиграции в Новую Зеландию, поступило больше половины средней месячной нормы заявок от американцев.

Donald Trump Is Making Canada Great Again

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Pres >. [+] Washington, DC, on October 11, 2020 (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

On Wednesday, Canada became the second country in the world to legalize marijuana for adults, and the first to do so with a fully regulated commercial market. This has rightfully been big news on both sides of the border, as Americans wait for the United States to catch up with our more enlightened neighbor to the north and finally end prohibition here at home.

The problem now is that in failing to have kept pace with our northern neighbor, the Trump Administration and Congress are potentially giving away the world’s next great industry to Canada.

For an administration that came into power on an “America First” agenda, railed against international trade deals for being unfair to the United States, and promised to create new jobs here at home, its current stance on marijuana policy could not be any more counter to their stated goals. If anything, the Trump Administration’s current stance on the cannabis industry can only be described as “Canada First.”

In a previous column , I laid out the political case for why President Trump should embrace legalization. Early indications are that the administration is at least considering this point of view. Recently, Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), one of the strongest supporters of cannabis legalization in Congress , told the press that President Trump is likely to push for some kind of legalization after the midterms. Meanwhile, Tom Angell of Marijuana Moment reported right here on Forbes that Congressman Blumenauer (D-OR), another of Congress’ strongest supporters of ending prohibition , has been imploring Democrats to get more aggressive on this issue, fearing that their continued failure to do so will allow President Trump to take this issue and the associated political gains from the party in advance of the 2020 elections. In a letter to Congressional Democratic leadership he wrote, “If we fail to act swiftly, I fear as the 2020 election approaches, Donald Trump will claim credit for our work in an effort to shore up support—especially from young voters.”

While it is encouraging to see potential movement on this issue in the coming years, this administration’s failure to act, like those that preceded it from both political parties, has put American cannabis companies at a significant disadvantage compared to their Canadian counterparts. For the biggest proof of this, look no further than public market activity around cannabis businesses. While some American companies like MedMen and Green Thumb Industries have enjoyed public market valuations north of $2 billion, these pale in comparison to their Canadian counterparts. The largest Canadian publicly traded companies have received much higher public market valuations on average, giving them access to cheaper capital and a stronger currency to make acquisitions in the industry. Canopy Growth currently has a valuation of $11.6 billion, Aphria is at $3.7 billion, and Tilray notoriously had a market cap of nearly $20 billion in mid September, before coming back to a still impressive $13.8 billion as of Wednesday.

The great irony with these publicly traded companies is that Canadian companies are financially benefiting from American investment activity, while American companies are forced to go north for their public market activity. Tilray’s valuation explosion happened on the NASDAQ, where Cronos also trades, while Canopy Growth is listed on the New York Stock Exchange, which is also soon to be the home of Aurora Cannabis. While this has benefitted American public sector investors, most of those gains leave the country for Canada where the companies are based and where most of their stock is held.


Meanwhile, American companies are barred from listing on an exchange in the United States because federal law still deems their activity to be illegal. Even when listed in Canada, American cannabis companies cannot access the country’s largest exchange, the Toronto Stock Exchange, who will list Canadian marijuana companies but not any that engage in federally illegal conduct. American companies instead are listed on the secondary Canadian Securities Exchange, which ironically is experiencing a resurgence due largely to American cannabis company listings. This leads to a disproportionate amount of investment into American companies coming from Canadian public sector investors, with many of these profits staying in Canada and benefiting the Canadian economy, while American investors largely sit on the sidelines.

Part of the reason that Canadian companies enjoy such high valuations is their ability to access international markets, which remain largely off limits to American companies. A country of 36 million people is likely not enough to support several multi-billion dollar cannabis companies. These valuation boosts have largely been based off of Canada’s massive international head start. Many of these companies have built production facilities in Europe, or have bought interest in cannabis licenses around the world. American companies, still viewed as drug traffickers by the Trump Administration and the federal government at large, are unable to export their products to these emerging international markets. States like Oregon, which has a massive oversupply issue but is known for producing some of the best quality cannabis in the world, is not allowed to sell that product across state lines, let alone to import into European markets.

If this situation doesn’t change soon, the federal government will likely have ceded the next great global industry to Canada. Many people have speculated that when federal prohibition ends, alcohol and tobacco companies will come in and acquire the current leaders of the American cannabis industry. While that may be true to a degree, the meaningful head start that we are giving to Canadian companies, with their massive valuations, access to cheap capital, and international assets, means that even when this does become legal across the United States it may very well be Canadians who wind up acquiring and owning the most prized American cannabis assets. It is not too late to reverse this trend, but the federal government must act fast to give Americans a fighting chance to compete in this growing global market.

This has led to U.S. businesses literally begging the Trump administration to take proactive action in order to level the playing field. Terra Tech, which is based in Irving, Calif., and trades in the over-the-counter market in the United States, recently took out a full-page ad in the Wall Street Journal on the eve of legalization day in Canada imploring the president to legalize cannabis in the United States . The letter starts by rightly pointing out how the federal government’s inaction has put American business at a significant disadvantage.

“The rapidly growing American cannabis industry represents an extraordinary economic opportunity for our country, yet Canada is threatening to deprive American farmers, workers and businesses from the prosperity that rightly belongs within our borders.”

There is only one way to give American cannabis companies a chance to compete with their counterparts to the north, despite the head start they already enjoy. That is is for the Trump Administration to remove the shackles by legalizing marijuana in the United States. If this administration truly cares about creating jobs and opportunities for American businesspeople, workers, farmers and investors, they will not wait until it is politically expedient to support legalization, although that should have already occurred as well, but will move aggressively to legalize now. The longer they wait, the more likely that they will have given the future of this industry to Canada.

President Trump, stop making Canada Great Again and give American companies the boost they need to make cannabis the next great American industry.

Pres >. [+] Washington, DC, on October 11, 2020 (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

On Wednesday, Canada became the second country in the world to legalize marijuana for adults, and the first to do so with a fully regulated commercial market. This has rightfully been big news on both sides of the border, as Americans wait for the United States to catch up with our more enlightened neighbor to the north and finally end prohibition here at home.

The problem now is that in failing to have kept pace with our northern neighbor, the Trump Administration and Congress are potentially giving away the world’s next great industry to Canada.

For an administration that came into power on an “America First” agenda, railed against international trade deals for being unfair to the United States, and promised to create new jobs here at home, its current stance on marijuana policy could not be any more counter to their stated goals. If anything, the Trump Administration’s current stance on the cannabis industry can only be described as “Canada First.”

In a previous column , I laid out the political case for why President Trump should embrace legalization. Early indications are that the administration is at least considering this point of view. Recently, Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), one of the strongest supporters of cannabis legalization in Congress , told the press that President Trump is likely to push for some kind of legalization after the midterms. Meanwhile, Tom Angell of Marijuana Moment reported right here on Forbes that Congressman Blumenauer (D-OR), another of Congress’ strongest supporters of ending prohibition , has been imploring Democrats to get more aggressive on this issue, fearing that their continued failure to do so will allow President Trump to take this issue and the associated political gains from the party in advance of the 2020 elections. In a letter to Congressional Democratic leadership he wrote, “If we fail to act swiftly, I fear as the 2020 election approaches, Donald Trump will claim credit for our work in an effort to shore up support—especially from young voters.”

While it is encouraging to see potential movement on this issue in the coming years, this administration’s failure to act, like those that preceded it from both political parties, has put American cannabis companies at a significant disadvantage compared to their Canadian counterparts. For the biggest proof of this, look no further than public market activity around cannabis businesses. While some American companies like MedMen and Green Thumb Industries have enjoyed public market valuations north of $2 billion, these pale in comparison to their Canadian counterparts. The largest Canadian publicly traded companies have received much higher public market valuations on average, giving them access to cheaper capital and a stronger currency to make acquisitions in the industry. Canopy Growth currently has a valuation of $11.6 billion, Aphria is at $3.7 billion, and Tilray notoriously had a market cap of nearly $20 billion in mid September, before coming back to a still impressive $13.8 billion as of Wednesday.

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The great irony with these publicly traded companies is that Canadian companies are financially benefiting from American investment activity, while American companies are forced to go north for their public market activity. Tilray’s valuation explosion happened on the NASDAQ, where Cronos also trades, while Canopy Growth is listed on the New York Stock Exchange, which is also soon to be the home of Aurora Cannabis. While this has benefitted American public sector investors, most of those gains leave the country for Canada where the companies are based and where most of their stock is held.

Meanwhile, American companies are barred from listing on an exchange in the United States because federal law still deems their activity to be illegal. Even when listed in Canada, American cannabis companies cannot access the country’s largest exchange, the Toronto Stock Exchange, who will list Canadian marijuana companies but not any that engage in federally illegal conduct. American companies instead are listed on the secondary Canadian Securities Exchange, which ironically is experiencing a resurgence due largely to American cannabis company listings. This leads to a disproportionate amount of investment into American companies coming from Canadian public sector investors, with many of these profits staying in Canada and benefiting the Canadian economy, while American investors largely sit on the sidelines.

Part of the reason that Canadian companies enjoy such high valuations is their ability to access international markets, which remain largely off limits to American companies. A country of 36 million people is likely not enough to support several multi-billion dollar cannabis companies. These valuation boosts have largely been based off of Canada’s massive international head start. Many of these companies have built production facilities in Europe, or have bought interest in cannabis licenses around the world. American companies, still viewed as drug traffickers by the Trump Administration and the federal government at large, are unable to export their products to these emerging international markets. States like Oregon, which has a massive oversupply issue but is known for producing some of the best quality cannabis in the world, is not allowed to sell that product across state lines, let alone to import into European markets.

If this situation doesn’t change soon, the federal government will likely have ceded the next great global industry to Canada. Many people have speculated that when federal prohibition ends, alcohol and tobacco companies will come in and acquire the current leaders of the American cannabis industry. While that may be true to a degree, the meaningful head start that we are giving to Canadian companies, with their massive valuations, access to cheap capital, and international assets, means that even when this does become legal across the United States it may very well be Canadians who wind up acquiring and owning the most prized American cannabis assets. It is not too late to reverse this trend, but the federal government must act fast to give Americans a fighting chance to compete in this growing global market.

This has led to U.S. businesses literally begging the Trump administration to take proactive action in order to level the playing field. Terra Tech, which is based in Irving, Calif., and trades in the over-the-counter market in the United States, recently took out a full-page ad in the Wall Street Journal on the eve of legalization day in Canada imploring the president to legalize cannabis in the United States . The letter starts by rightly pointing out how the federal government’s inaction has put American business at a significant disadvantage.

“The rapidly growing American cannabis industry represents an extraordinary economic opportunity for our country, yet Canada is threatening to deprive American farmers, workers and businesses from the prosperity that rightly belongs within our borders.”

There is only one way to give American cannabis companies a chance to compete with their counterparts to the north, despite the head start they already enjoy. That is is for the Trump Administration to remove the shackles by legalizing marijuana in the United States. If this administration truly cares about creating jobs and opportunities for American businesspeople, workers, farmers and investors, they will not wait until it is politically expedient to support legalization, although that should have already occurred as well, but will move aggressively to legalize now. The longer they wait, the more likely that they will have given the future of this industry to Canada.

President Trump, stop making Canada Great Again and give American companies the boost they need to make cannabis the next great American industry.

Teen ‘attacked’ for wearing ‘Make America Great Again’ hat

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A teenage Trump supporter says he was attacked at a Texas fast-food restaurant because he was wearing a «Make America Great Again» hat.

Hunter Richard said he was the victim of an unprovoked assault when an unidentified man threw a drink in his face and snatched his red cap.

The 16-year-old filmed the incident, which took place at Whataburger in San Antonio on Tuesday night.

The man is heard in the clip saying the hat will look good in his fireplace.


Hunter told WOAI-TV: «I support my president and if you don’t let’s have a conversation about it instead of ripping my hat off.

«I just think a conversation about politics is more productive for the entire whole rather than taking my hat and yelling subjective words to me.»

US President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr, shared the video on Twitter, calling it «disgusting».

The San Antonio Police Department confirmed it was investigating the incident.

Investigators said the suspect was a 30-year-old man, but would not be identified unless a warrant was issued.

Whataburger Corporate Communications later said in a statement: «We were shocked to see this video and certainly don’t condone this type of customer behaviour in our restaurants.»

Rumble, a San Antonio bar, said on Facebook the attacker was one of its employees.

The bar said it had fired him because his alleged actions «go against everything that this establishment stands for».

Rumble later deleted its Facebook page after a number of comments about the incident.

The red cap emblazoned with Mr Trump’s campaign slogan has become a trademark of his supporters.

Make Ontario Great Again Канада

A new right-wing populist party in Canada faced its first electoral challenge this week, performing exactly how populist parties should: by drawing to the polls disaffected conservatives who otherwise would have stayed at home. Although the election was a one-off byelection for one of Canada’s 338 parliamentary seats and the party didn’t win, it’s a promising sign for the new party and for many Canadian conservatives who fear they will split, rather than add to, the broader conservative vote.

Centered around its charismatic French-Canadian leader, Maxime “Mad Max” Bernier, the People’s Party of Canada (PPC) was founded as an alternative to the country’s establishment-friendly Conservative Party. That party, Canada’s second-largest and the main opposition to Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party in parliament, has become “intellectually corrupt,” says Bernier, and won’t be able to mount a serious ideological challenge to Trudeau in the country’s broader election later this year.

Bernier and the PPC are taking up issues largely ignored by the Conservatives; issues such as mass immigration, crony capitalism, Third-World multiculturalism, and the increasingly oppressive atmosphere fostered by Trudeau and Canada’s media elite.

The strategy appears to be working. Although the party only managed to become registered officially at the beginning of this year, they already have tens of thousands of members and they’ve established organizing committees in each of Canada’s 300-plus districts in order to field candidates in the upcoming general election. Meanwhile, coverage of Bernier’s rallies has included testimonials from Canadians previously disengaged with what they see as a wholly uninspiring political sphere.

In this week’s byelection, which took place in a district just outside the ultra-liberal west coast city of Vancouver, the PPC took more than 10 percent of the vote; a strong showing given the incredible level of hostility from local media (some outlets banned the PPC candidate from debating). If the Conservatives, who drew 23 percent, had actively sought out PPC supporters and won their votes, they could have built up a real challenge to the far-Left New Democratic Party, which took in 38 percent. The center-Left Liberals took in 26 percent.

Predictably, the outspoken Bernier is broadly derided in Canada’s media and political classes. Highly adept at social media, Bernier regularly evokes hysteria from liberal politicians and commentators, tweeting things like, “people who can afford plane tickets aren’t refugees” and “religious fanatics who want to behead you” don’t belong in Canada. He’s also been leading a media campaign against Trudeau’s recent decision to enter Canada into the UN’s Global Compact on Migration (something President Trump’s already rejected); an official commitment of principles between most Western countries regarding the treatment of “irregular” third-world migrants.

Most alarming for Canada’s political and media elite has been Bernier’s criticism of Canada’s unofficial twin doctrines of diversity and Third-World multiculturalism; areas of discussion considered at least as sacrosanct for the elite in Canada as they are in the United States. Reflecting how extreme globalist attitudes are among the elite, Trudeau has proudly declared that Canada is the world’s first “post-national” country. Bernier lays into such sentiments wherever he can. Last summer, he tweeted: “Trudeau keeps pushing his ‘diversity is our strength’ slogan . . . Yes, Canada is a huge and diverse country . . . But where do we draw the line?”

In one of his first speeches as PPC leader, Bernier told supporters: “We must start pushing back against this politically correct nonsense that’s destroying our society and culture . . . Our immigration policy should not aim to forcibly change the cultural character and social fabric of Canada, as radical proponents of multiculturalism want.”

For many regular Canadians across the country, especially those in the long-ignored western provinces, such frank talk is a godsend. Ever since the late sixties, when Justin Trudeau’s father, Pierre, took power (similar to his son, he once stated “the hope of mankind lies in multinationalism”), Canadians have been forced to forgo their British and, more broadly, European identity in exchange for unchecked multiculturalism (above and beyond mere French bilingualism) and mass immigration. Because of the latter, nearly one-in-four residents of Canada are now foreign-born.

Meanwhile, simply criticizing third-world multiculturalism in Canada can lead to crippling fines levied by the country’s notorious “human rights” commissions and even criminal charges under its “hate speech” laws—from which Bernier, being an elected official, is immune.

Unsurprisingly, critics, including from the conservative side, say Bernier is playing on “fears about immigration” and “pandering to racists.” One top PPC organizer disagrees that it’s Bernier doing the pandering, telling reporters recently: “the main issue of our times right now is that you have a political class that’s pandering systematically to politically correct interests, and that makes them unable to address serious issues that concern people a lot, and they feel they’re disenfranchised.” Canadians certainly have much about which to feel disenfranchised. One half of Canadians, for instance, want immigration reduced. The PPC is the only party calling for immigration restrictions.

As this week’s results show, the Conservatives are leaving votes on the table by not picking on up issues the PPC is pushing. Staying too close to Trudeau’s Liberal Party has done nothing but alienate conservatives and independents who want real change, but haven’t got a party to get behind. The PPC is that party.

Photo Credit: Geoff Robins/AFP/Getty Images

Make Canada Great Again

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