MPNP Information and Employer Engagement Sessions in London Канада


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MPNP Information and Employer Engagement Sessions in London Канада

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Employee engagement starts with a conversation

When your employees are engaged, they’re more productive and your business is more profitable. But how do you spot an engaged employee? What role do you play in driving engagement? And why don’t the same techniques work for every business?

In this series of interviews, Kerri Hollis asks the experts. Join the conversation by watching the videos or listening to the podcasts.

“It doesn’t really matter if you take Fr >Helen Tupper, co-founder of Amazing If, thinks it’s about time we abandoned the nine-to-five workday in favour of a more flexible and agile culture. In this interview, she explains why – and what the alternative would be.

If you’re short on time.

“There’s no magic formula for being a great place to work.”

Kate Wood, Director of Culture at Chess, has just led her company to the top of the Sunday Times’ Best Companies to Work For. In this interview, she explains how she did it.

If you’re short on time.

“Freelancers don’t want to feel like they’re just selling their hours.”

Geraint Holliman, serial business owner, leads a workforce of freelancers. In this interview, he explains how he makes them feel like a permanent part of the business – even when they’re not.

If you’re short on time.

“We’re adults – people can figure out when they work best.”

Ian MacRae, workplace psychologist, doesn’t like being labelled a millennial. In this interview, he explains why you shouldn’t stereotype the way people want to work based on generational differences.

If you’re short on time.

“ Employee engagement is people being able to bring their best selves to work and do their best work at work. ”

Explore the psychology behind collaboration

Collaboration is the secret to every business success. In today’s workplace, you need to know how your team works, thinks, and thrives with the right tools.

Something to talk about

Get a quick roundup of the employee engagement conversations in these blog posts.

Do you know employee engagement when you see it?

Your employees might be productive, but that doesn’t mean they’re engaged. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis talks to Helen Tupper to find out what employee engagement really looks like.

We still measure employee performance like it’s the 1930s. Here’s how to change.

The 40-hour work week might have been great when it debuted in the 1930s. But it’s not so relevant now. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis and Helen Tupper look for a better way to measure performance.

Stick to the plan: the key to measuring employee engagement

The world’s most engaging workplaces didn’t get that way by accident. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis and Kate Wood discuss how Chess’ blueprint for culture has boosted employee engagement.

Here’s the secret to being the #1 company to work for

When you’re at the top of your game, everyone wants to know your secret. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis joins Kate Wood to explore the role of communication in improving employee engagement.

Work for independence: how to engage your freelancer workforce

Independence. Ambition. Agility. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis and Geraint Holliman discover that business leaders have more in common with their freelance workforce than they might think.

When do you work best? Habits of great writers and great employees

Everyone has their own way of working. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis and Geraint Holliman discuss how technology can engage disparate teams – no matter how, where, or when they’re working.

When ping pong fails: the real driver of employee engagement

It’s the simplest things that often go unnoticed. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis sits down with Ian MacRae to identify what really drives employee engagement.

There’s more to millennials than any blog post can tell you – but we’ll try

When you treat all your employees the same way, you’re stopping them from reaching their full potential. In this blog post, Kerri Hollis joins Ian MacRae to bust the myths around millennials in the workplace.

3 ways modern tech can foster an inclusive culture

An inclusive workplace culture values every individual. Explore how modern technology like Microsoft’s top inclusivity tools can empower every one of your employees, helping them achieve, innovate, and succeed.

10 inclusive behaviours

Research shows that more diverse, inclusive companies are more competitive, creative, and collaborative. Here are the personality traits you need to spot – in yourself and others – when leading a strong, inclusive workplace.

Inclusivity – the spark behind innovation

Inclusivity isn’t an obligation – it’s an opportunity for smart companies to innovate products and services. 20% of the UK population has a disability, but 100% of your market gains value from accessible tools.

How do you solve the employee engagement challenge?

Even equipped with the latest findings of your employee engagement survey, it can be difficult to gain actionable insights. Discover how Microsoft’s Workplace Analytics data can be harnessed to see the biggest employee trends across your business.

4 ways to improve your employee engagement

Engaging your workforce increases productivity and enhances the employee experience. Discover the secret ingredients to worker engagement, starting with a pinch of culture change and a cup of the right technology.

4 simple ways to unlock creativity in the workplace

Creativity is good for business, powering productivity and performance. One study shows that UK businesses investing in creativity are 75% more financially successful. Now, explore how to encourage your organisation’s creative flow.

The engagement effect

Engaged employees make great businesses greater. All it takes is the right collaborative tools. See how, in these case studies.

Marks & Spencer

Every employee should be able to work their way. Marks & Spencer makes that possible anywhere, any time, with Microsoft SharePoint.

Centrica

When your employees have great ideas, they need a great way to share them. See how Centrica built one with Microsoft Teams and Yammer.

Ports of Jersey

It’s not enough to run a business behind closed doors. Ports of Jersey brought their entire workforce together using Microsoft Office 365.

Get employees talking

You’ve heard about how technology can engage your employees. Now see it for yourself. Discover the tools used and trusted by the experts.

Teams

User rating: 5 out of 5

When your employees have a job to do and need to get their team together, give them Teams. Everyone can chat and share documents in real time with members inside and outside the business.

Yammer

User rating: 5 out of 5

If you want every employee to have their say on a topic, idea, or objective, start a group in Yammer. Here, anyone can start or join an open conversation. So engagement is truly business-wide.

WorkPlace Analytics

User rating: 5 out of 5

Get insights just from using Office 365 with Workplace Analytics. It taps into your data to show you how you collaborate. So, you can get even better at it.

Foreign employees and employers

Foreign employees

Foreign employers

If you are an employer who does not have a place of business in Canada, you can apply to have employment that you provide in Canada (for resident or non- resident employees) covered under the CPP . This coverage is optional.

Even if your country does not have a social security agreement with Canada, you can apply for coverage by filling out Form CPT13, Application for an Employer Resident Outside Canada to Cover Employment in Canada Under the Canada Pension Plan.

Employment in Canada by certified non-resident employers

Canada’s social security agreements with other countries

Canada has reciprocal social security agreements with other countries. These agreements ensure that only one plan covers an employee—the CPP or a foreign social security plan.

You can get an application form for coverage or for extending coverage under the CPP by going to Forms and publications.

For additional information, go to CPP/EI Explained then “Employment outside Canada” and select “Canada’s international social security agreements.”

If you have questions about coverage under the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) in other countries, go to la Régie des rentes du Québec.

Employer Engagement Services

Build our brand and connect with us! We have many great opportunties for you to meet with top NYU talent for all your recruiting needs. Reach out to recruitment@nyu.edu to start hiring NYU talent today!

Complimentary Services

Job Postings

Free online job and internship listing through Handshake, used by undergraduate and graduate students, as well as alumni.

On-Campus Interviews for NYU Students

Interview students in our state of the art space. Access our space which includes 23 interview rooms to conduct interviews on the New York University campus for full-time positions and paid summer internships during the academic year.

Career Education & Networking Events

We believe employers bring a valuable and unique perspective to students’ career exploration and development. Regardless of your current recruiting needs, we welcome your involvement in career development activities to stay connected to NYU students and build your brand on-campus. Some examples of past events are included below:

  • Boot Camps, Navigating Identities, Career Conversations, Women’s Networking Night

Organization Site Visits

Bring NYU student talent to your organization for an insider view. Visits range from 1-hour to a full-day experience and might include an office tour, alumni or employee panel, case activities, project/product demonstration, and position shadowing. Visits are tailored to meet your organization’s space and recruitment needs.

Social Media Takeovers

Share a day in the life at your organization. Build your organization’s brand, while cross-promoting open positions or promoting an upcoming event or information session using our @NYUWasserman handle to engage with students in a twitter take-over or Insta-Stories take-over to give students an insider view.

Blog Posts

Become a guest blogger! Create quick posts by providing inside information about your industry, your career or job search story, networking tips, or current NYU alum spotlight within your organization. We can work with you on a topic that works for you and your recruiting needs. Check out an example of a great employer blog.

Signature Events

Tabling Events

Receive two tables for two hours in our Palladium Building Lobby which sees high foot traffic for the gym, residence hall, Wasserman Center, and Dining Hall. Discuss company culture, desired candidates, and enjoy networking the NYU talent in this casual atmosphere. $100

Select Industry Meet-Ups

Join 3-5 other organzations from your industry to speak with students and share more information about opportunities you have available and interact with top NYU talent. $150

Coffee Chats

Customizable informational chats with students are designed to offer students individual or small group meetings with a representative from your organization. Hosted in our office and scheduled either open coffee hours, or scheduled 15/30 minute appointments the sessions provide students with a brief overview of your organization and available job opportunities, as well as insight into careers in your industry. $200

Information Sessions/Corporate Presentations

60 minute employer information sessions give you the opportunity to share valuable company information with interested students in your own private space in our office on campus. Discuss company culture, desired candidates, and enjoy networking the NYU talent at the end of your presentation. $475-$575

Broad Impact and Niche Career Fairs

Career Fairs are unique and convenient opportunities to meet with a large number of motivated and interested students. Attending a career fair is an excellent way for organizations to gain visibility on-campus, build your brand, and maximize recruiting potential at NYU. $150-$750

Select Diversity Programs

Engage with top NYU students by sponsoring or attending one of the following programs targeted at underrepresented groups. Programs include:
Diversity Internship Career & Prep Program (DICP), First Class Program (First Generation Student Mentorship Program), Women’s Herstory Month Series, Queer Connect Networking Night, Navigating Identities (Finance, Tech, Entertainment, Media, & Communications). $1000-$5000

Career Center Takeover

Takeover our Union Square state of the art office for a day to have your brand and opportunities in front of students in all forms of engagement. Recruit professionals from your organization to engage in activities that include: resume reviews, mock interviews, tabling, networking information sessions and more! Your logo and swag will be included throughout the office as well. $3500/half day. $5000/full day.

MPNP Information and Employer Engagement Sessions in London Канада

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Applications Open For Manitoba Immigration’s Business Investor Stream

May 22, 2020 – Manitoba immigration has announced applications are open for the province’s new Business Investor Stream (BIS) under the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program.

Interested candidates can apply for both the Entrepreneur Pathway and the Farm Investor Pathway. The Entrepreneur Pathway has an interim application procedure, more details of which are below.

The Entrepreneur Pathway is for applicants wanting to open a business in Manitoba. Candidates are initially issued with a temporary work permit. They are nominated for permanent residence after establishing a business meeting the conditions of a Business Performance Agreement. Priority is given to candidates starting businesses outside Winnipeg.


The Farm Investor Pathway is for applicants wanting to open and operate a farm in rural Manitoba. Candidates are initially issued with a temporary work permit. They are nominated for permanent residence after establishing a business meeting the conditions of a Business Performance Agreement.

The Manitoba Immigrant Nominee Program announced the new Business Investor Stream in November 2020, replacing the old MPNP-Business stream. Applications from business candidates have been paused since the announcement was made.

The interim application procedure for the Entrepreneur Pathway will be in place until a new online system is launched, expected by the end of 2020. The procedure involves seven steps, as published at www.immigratemanitoba.com.

Step 1: Self-Assessment

  • Determine that you meet the minimum criteria of the Entrepreneur Pathway (see below).

Step 2: Explore Manitoba and Research Your Business Concept

  • Research your proposed business in Manitoba and explore the province.
  • An in-person exploratory visit and attending business seminars offered by the Business Consulting Unit (BCU) of the Immigration and Economic Opportunities Division are both encouraged.

Step 3: Submit Your Self-Assessment and Business Concept Forms

  • A response will be emailed to you. If you do not meet the minimum requirements, your business concept will not be reviewed.

Step 4: Receive a Letter of Advice To Apply and Submit Your Full Application

Step 5: Application Assessment

  • Your complete application will be assessed by the MPNP. This may include an interview.
  • If your application meets all of the requirements, the MPNP will email you an approval letter.
  • You must sign a Business Performance Agreement before receiving a letter of support for a work permit.

Step 6: Operate your business in Manitoba

  • With your work permit, you can implement your business plan.

Step 7: Receive your MPNP nomination

  • When the MPNP has verified that you have successfully completed the terms and conditions of the Business Performance Agreement, the MPNP will issue you a certificate of nomination.
  • Once nominated, you can apply to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada for permanent residence.

Manitoba Business Investor Stream: Entrepreneur Pathway Requirements

1) Business Experience

  • Minimum of three years of full time work experience in the past five years either as an active business owner or working in a senior management role of a successful business.
  • Business owners are given higher points in comparison to senior managers.
  • Business owners must have at least 33 1/3% ownership to qualify for points.

2) Official Languages Proficiency

  • Minimum Canadian high school certificate equivalent
  • No minimum or maximum age; however, ranking points are allocated to candidates 25 to 49 years of age.

5) Business Investment

  • Minimum investment is $250,000 for businesses situated in the Manitoba Capital Region.
  • Minimum investment is $150,000 if a business is situated outside of the Manitoba Capital Region.
  • Business Investment must be made in an eligible business as defined by the MPNP.
  • The proposed business must create or maintain at least one job for a Canadian Citizen or a Permanent Resident in Manitoba (excluding owners of the business and/or their close relatives).

6) Business Research Visit

  • A Business Plan is required and is an integral part of the application.
  • A business research visit allows the applicant to conduct extensive research of their future business investment or proposal. The Business Research Visit must be conducted no more than one year prior to the submission of your EOI.

Points will be allocated to you if:

  • Your spouse has CLB/NCLC 5 or higher;
  • You or your spouse have CLB/NCLC 5 or higher in the Second Official Language;
  • You or your spouse or common-law partner have a close relative currently residing in Manitoba for more than one year;
  • Your child is enrolled in an accredited Manitoba educational institution and is actively pursuing academic, professional or vocational training on a full-time basis for at least six months prior to the date of submission of EOI; and/or
  • You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner have completed a program of full-time study for at least one year at a post-secondary institution in Manitoba. You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner must have done this after you turned 17 years old and with a valid study permit;

You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner have completed at least six months of continuous full time employment in Manitoba. A letter of reference from the employer and a copy of the work permit must be provided.

  • Minimum of $500,000
  • Your personal net worth will be verified by a third-party supplier approved by the MPNP. A verification report, along with the application, must be submitted to the MPNP within 120 days of receiving your LAA.

Business Performance Agreement

  • After an application is approved, a Business Performance Agreement (BPA) must be signed prior to the MPNP issuing you a letter of support for applying for a work permit.

Manitoba Business Investor Stream: Farm Investor Pathway Requirements

1) Farm Business Experience

  • Minimum of three years farm business management or farm ownership and operation experience supported by verifiable documents.

2) Official Languages Proficiency

  • The Farm Investor Pathway (FIP) recognizes language capabilities in either of Canada’s two official languages are an important adaptability skill that will accelerate your ability to become economically established in rural Manitoba.
  • If you are invited to attend a FIP interview, you will be required to conduct the interview in either French or English.

3) Farm Business Investment

  • At least $150,000. You are expected to establish a farming business in rural Manitoba.
  • Farm business investments must be in eligible tangible assets as defined by the MPNP.
  • A farm business plan is required and is an integral part of the application.
  • Investments into a farm business operated primarily for the purposes of deriving passive investment income or speculative purposes are not eligible.

4) Farm Business Research Visit

  • You must conduct a Farm Business Research Visit to Manitoba.

5) Farm Business Activities

  • A farm business entity should have ongoing and recurring business activities in rural Manitoba.
  • You are required to live on the farm and actively participate in the management of the farm business on an ongoing basis from within Manitoba.
  • The farm business must be in active primary agriculture production and economically viable.
  • The MPNP requires you to conduct value-added farm business activities in Manitoba. Purely speculative activities or the use of third-party farm managers are not eligible under the MPNP.

6) Economic Establishment Adaptability

  • You must demonstrate adaptability, specifically relating to practical farming skills, technical knowledge and experience in technological based farming practices that will transfer directly to Manitoba’s current primary farm production industry.
  • At least $350,000
  • The FIP retains the option to have personal net worth verified by a third-party supplier approved by the MPNP. If optioned, the verification report along with the application must be submitted to the MPNP within 120 days of receiving Invitation to Apply.

8) Business Performance Agreement

  • After an application is approved, a Business Performance Agreement (BPA) must be signed prior to the MPNP issuing a letter of support for applying for a work permit.

Interested employers: Kindly contact us here to receive further information.

Interested candidates: Find out whether you qualify to Canada by completing our free on-line evaluation. We will provide you with our evaluation within 1-2 business days.

Read more news about Canada Immigration by clicking here.

Smoking Cessation in the Workplace: A Guide to Helping Your Employees Quit Smoking

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Health Canada would like to thank the following people for their valuable contribution to this guidebook:

  • Dr. Jean-Marc Assaad, McGill University
  • Dan Boone, Canadian Auto Workers (CAW)
  • Janet Carr, Ottawa Public Health
  • Judy Elliott, Durham Region Health Department
  • Dr. Pebbles Fagan, National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
  • Melissa Feddersen, Okanagan University College
  • Niki George, Lung Association of Newfoundland
  • Eugene Haslam, Zaphod Beeblebrox
  • Brenda Keenan, Irving Paper
  • Lise Labrie, Montreal Public Health
  • Dr. Kelli-ann Lawrence, Brock University
  • Neil MacKenzie, Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, Ontario
  • Heidi McGuire, Hamilton Public Health and Community Services
  • Donna McNamara, Medcan Health
  • Anne Meloche, Program Training and Consultation Centre
  • Sherry Mooney, Wellness Institute
  • Yvette Penman, Calgary Health Region
  • Bev Pitfield, Sudbury & District Health Unit
  • Denise Polson, Natural Resources Canada
  • Brenda Stankiewicz, Sudbury & District Health Unit
  • Dan Steeves, Capital District Health Authority
  • Bonnie Topic, Dofasco
  • Cathy Walker, Canadian Auto Workers (CAW)
  • Michelle Walker, Manitoba Lotteries Corporation
  • Steve Widmeyer, Secunda Marine Services

Section I: Introduction

What Is This Guide About?

This guide is for employers and others who promote health in the workplace. It outlines the reasons why workplaces should get involved and support employees’ efforts to cut down or quit smoking. It also provides practical, relevant material on smoking cessation that can be used either as part of a comprehensive wellness program or as an initiative on its own. The kinds of smoking cessation activities that can be offered are explained, the necessary steps are outlined, and handouts, tools and a list of further resources and references are also included.

Who Is This Guide For?

This guide is for employers who want to help their employees quit smoking. It is also for any workplace leaders such as union representatives, workplace health promotion or occupational health representatives, human resource managers, and employee assistance program representatives.

For What Types of Workplaces and Workers?

The guide is for all types of workplaces — small, medium, and large, public and private sector, unionized and non-unionized, and any type of industry or sector. It is also for all types of workers — men and women of various ages who have different levels of education, experience and training, and who may be full-time, part-time or casual employees.

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Tobacco Control Policies and Other Workplace Wellness Initiatives

This guide builds on the information available in Health Canada’s Towards a Healthier Workplace: A Guidebook on Tobacco Control Policies, designed to help employees and employers who are creating or strengthening tobacco control policies in their workplaces. This guide can also complement workplace wellness initiatives that are already taking place or that are being developed. Smoking cessation is one factor that will greatly improve employees’ health. Workplace wellness initiatives can also support employees to make healthy choices around physical activity, nutrition, work-life balance, mental health and a variety of other factors.

A Snapshot of Canadian Businesses

Did You Know?

How This Guide Was Developed

The information in this guidebook is based on a literature review that looked at various sources dealing with smoking cessation in general, and smoking cessation in the workplace in particular. The methodology for the review included an information database search and an Internet search that was limited to research reports published after 1994. Interviews were carried out with experts in workplace health issues and tobacco cessation, as well as workplaces themselves. Feedback on a draft version of the guide was also provided by the workplace health and tobacco cessation experts and the workplaces highlighted in this guide. Refer to Section VII: References for a list of many of the sources from the literature review. This guidebook was partially revised in 2006 using new information from the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) as well as updated information from the Conference Board of Canada on the costs associated with employing people who smoke.

Section II: The WHY, WHO and WHAT of Quitting Smoking in the Workplace

WHY Should Employers Be Involved?

There are six main reasons for employers to support smoking cessation in the workplace:

  • improved employee health;
  • increased productivity;
  • reduced costs;
  • enhanced job satisfaction;
  • effective setting;
  • better corporate image.

Improved Employee Health

You cannot put a dollar value on good health. Good health is an invaluable resource. As an employer you need to invest in the health of your employees — they are your organization’s most important asset. Employees who do not smoke take fewer sick days, go on disability less often, and are less likely to retire early because of poor health. Most people want to quit smoking.

Increased Productivity

Helping employees quit smoking is good for business. On average non-smokers take fewer sick days than smokers. Non-smokers can be more productive because they do not take the unscheduled smoking breaks that some smokers do.

Employees who smoke may also take longer breaks than non-smoking employees. Because of new municipal bylaws and stronger provincial legislation smoking is no longer allowed in most workplaces. This means that employees must go outside to smoke a cigarette, often to a designated smoking area and sometimes they must leave the premises completely. Because it now takes more time for employees to reach a place where they can smoke this translates into longer breaks. It also costs employers to pay for and install commercial ashtrays outside as well as to clean the ashtrays and the surrounding area.

Reduced Costs

Supporting employees to quit smoking is an investment worth its return. If employees who smoke are helped to quit, employers will see less loss of skills, knowledge and corporate memory due to premature death and early retirement. Many companies that have offered smoking cessation activities to their employees report positive results. According to the Canadian Lung Association, smoking cessation support is a sound economic investment and is especially profitable when offered over the long term (five or more years).

«From a business perspective, our employees are our most valuable asset and one of our greatest competitive advantages. We have put a lot into hiring, training and keeping our world-class employees. It is a business imperative to have them healthy, and at work.»

— Bronko Jazvac, General Manager of
Manufacturing Services, Dofasco, Hamilton

The Conference Board of Canada estimates the cost each year for every employee who smokes as up to $3,396 through increased absenteeism, decreased productivity and the costs associated with maintaining and cleaning outside smoking areas. Refer to Section V: Tools For Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a formula to calculate some of the costs of smoking in the workplace.

The Hard Costs of Smoking

«Companies spend a lot of time and money on equipment maintenance, but can easily forget about human maintenance. Employees are our most important assets, and we don’t want them to break down, or lose time. We began to learn that this meant avoiding accidents, but also avoiding personal crisis, health crisis, financial crisis and so on.»

— Human Resource Manager, Irving Paper, Saint John from a case study conducted by the Canadian Labour and Business Centre

Enhanced Job Satisfaction

There are many reasons for wanting to quit smoking, but health concerns are the number one reason. According to a national survey that Statistics Canada carries out for Health Canada on a regular basis, fewer people are smoking, and those who do smoke are smoking less. The majority of people who smoke want to quit. Several studies show that a large majority of both smokers and non-smokers would rather work in a smoke-free environment. Another Health Canada study shows that many smokers would welcome smoking cessation programs offered by their employers.

When employees are healthy and have a strong sense of personal well-being, there is an improvement in their morale and the overall quality of the work environment. In this environment, employees are more productive and feel a greater sense of loyalty.

Effective Setting

Workplaces and homes are the two environments that can have the greatest effect on people’s health. Workplaces in particular are an ideal setting to help people quit smoking for several reasons:

  • Many people spend a good part of their time at work.
  • Workplaces have access to a large number of people on a regular basis. They have the opportunity to reach a high number of smokers on an ongoing basis.
  • Workplaces have access to some groups that would be hard to reach otherwise, such as different minority groups, and people who do not visit doctors and other health care professionals regularly.
  • Workplaces are convenient places for people to get information and support for quitting on an ongoing basis.
  • Workplaces can provide the supportive social environment necessary for quitting smoking. Smokers who want to quit, and recent ex-smokers can get support from other employees, and from others who promote health in the workplace.
  • Smoking bans in workplaces encourage employees who smoke to cut down or quit, and help those who are already smoke-free to stay that way.

Employers can make a difference. People try to quit when they are presented with opportunities and options, and are more likely to succeed when they have support. By providing and publicizing cessation activities, and offering a smoke-free working environment, employers and others who promote health in the workplace can help employees to quit smoking.

Better Corporate Image

Workplaces that care about the health of their employees portray a positive image within the workplace and the larger community. A better image helps to attract and keep talented workers. Workplaces that comply with non-smoking legislation are respected in the community. Those that go beyond these requirements by offering cessation support display an even greater commitment to the health and welfare of their employees. Some workplaces take a comprehensive approach to workplace health, and include tobacco reduction as part of a larger workplace health promotion strategy. Workplaces that are committed to the health of their employees become workplaces of choice.

Peer Pressure, Peer Power

It is Never too Late to Quit

«Employers have a profound responsibility to help people out with their health issues. They have hired the whole person and should be involved in individual health issues. Lots of people have picked up the habit at work — non-smoking bans are recent — it was often a way to socialize.»

— Cathy Walker, National Director of
Health and Safety, Canadian Auto Workers

WHO Smokes and Who Wants to Quit?

Most smokers want to quit, and among those who do quit, more than half stay smoke-free. According to the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) carried out by Health Canada in 2005:

  • 19 percent of Canadians aged 15 and older are current smokers.
  • 58 percent of current smokers are considering quitting in the next 6 months and of these, half are considering quitting in the next 30 days.
  • 34 percent of Canadians feel that smoking should not be allowed in any area of a workplace, either inside or outside.
  • 51 percent of Canadians feel that smoking should be allowed only in designated outdoor smoking areas of the workplace.
  • 94 percent of Canadians report some sort of smoking restrictions at their workplace and 54 percent report that smoking is banned completely from their workplace.

For more information about smoking trends in Canada, refer to Health Canada’s Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca/ctums.

The Stakes Are High with Employee Health


WHAT Are the Options for Employers Who Want to Support Their Employees to Quit Smoking?

The Basic Approaches and Options

Workplaces have a variety of approaches and options to help employees quit smoking. Smoking cessation supports can be offered as part of a workplace wellness program, but they can also be offered on their own. Having a non-smoking policy in the workplace not only protects employees from dangerous second-hand smoke, it also supports those employees who want to quit smoking and underlines employers’ commitment to employee health. There are a variety of approaches and options for employers to help their employees quit smoking, and different combinations of approaches and options can be offered in the workplace.

The basic workplace smoking cessation approaches include:

Comprehensive — This approach involves offering programs and activities at the workplace. Employees can then access the supports on-site, and often during work hours.

Facilitated — This approach involves working with outside agencies to deliver programs and activities off-site, and providing self-help materials.

Education and Information — Providing employees with information including self-help materials. Refer to Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a detailed comparison of the various approaches, including the pros and cons identified with each.

Smoking cessation options include:

Self-help

Most people who quit smoking get information from self-help materials such as pamphlets or Web sites. Information is available from many organizations across the country including local public health departments, authorities and districts, the Canadian Cancer Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation, and Lung Association. Health Canada also has many resources for people who want to quit smoking including On the Road to Quitting which is available in hardcopy and can be found online at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca. Workplaces can order self-help information and make it available to employees. Refer to Section IV: Resources for more information.

Brief, Professional Advice

A doctor, pharmacist or nurse can give some advice on quitting smoking as well as provide self-help material to take home. These health professionals can provide services at the workplace or off-site. Telephone quit-lines across the country also provide counselling and information. Refer to Section IV: Resources for toll-free quitline numbers across the country.

Integrated and Comprehensive Approaches in Québec

Individual Counselling

Individual counselling, usually by a physician, nurse, addictions specialist, employee assistance program (EAP) provider, or quit-line counsellor can help people who smoke adapt to life without cigarettes. Counselling can be offered at the workplace or employees can be referred to services off-site, including their own family physicians or public health nurses.

Group Programs

Group programs can be offered on-site or off-site and provided by the workplace itself, a public health department, authority or district, voluntary health agency, or community group. They usually include weekly sessions over a period of time, and can take place during or after work hours. Workplaces can subsidize these programs in whole or in part, and allow employees to attend during work hours. Spouses and other family members can also be invited to participate.

Quit-Smoking Medications

Nicotine gum and nicotine patches have been shown to help smokers quit and stay smoke-free. They are available without prescriptions. Bupropion is a prescription medication that may help reduce withdrawal symptoms and cravings. The nicotine inhaler is another option that requires a prescription. In general, people are more likely to quit smoking if they use a combination of quit-smoking medications, self-help materials and counselling or group programs. Workplace benefit plans can cover the cost of these medications for both the employees and their family members.

«In particular, in a period of anticipated growing skills shortages, those employers who pay attention to workplace health issues will have a competitive advantage over others in recruiting and retaining workers with much-needed skills.»

— Canadian Labour and Business Centre

Incentives, Contests and Special Events

Offering incentives is one way to encourage employees to think about quitting smoking and to take action. Holding contests or special events, including piggybacking on those taking place in the community is another way to get people interested and involved. A smoking employee can pair up with a non-smoking buddy and both team members can be eligible for prizes. Some examples are:

  • health fairs;
  • lunch and learn sessions with guest speakers;
  • quit and win contests;
  • smoke-free homes and cars challenges;
  • reimbursing employees for program costs for quitting smoking.

Hold activities in conjunction with national, provincial and community events such as:

  • National Non-Smoking Week (third week in January);
  • Weedless Wednesday
    (third Wednesday in January);
  • World No Tobacco Day on May 31;
  • Canada’s Healthy Workplace Week (last week in October);
  • National, provincial or local quit and win contests;
  • Implementation of new or stricter municipal non-smoking bylaws or provincial legislation.
Tips for Success

Some workplaces have more resources than others and can offer more comprehensive cessation support. However, there are a variety of ways that employers can help their employees quit smoking and any workplace that offers cessation activities shows a commitment to employee health and wellness. There are some proven strategies that can make cessation activities in the workplace more successful:

  • Use an integrated approach that includes non-smoking policies, health benefit plans, and cessation information and activities.
  • Ensure broad representation by involving staff and management, different departments, union representatives, and both smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers.
  • Subsidize quit-smoking medications.
  • Understand that quitting is a process. Allow employees to participate in activities and access quit-smoking medications as often as they need to make the various quit attempts often necessary to stay smoke-free for good.
  • Remove as many barriers as possible around participating in activities such as cost, location and time.
  • Tailor the program to your workplace, taking into consideration the needs of your employees, including accommodating shift workers and making sure written materials are language-appropriate.
  • Extend cessation benefits and activities to spouses and family members.
  • Take a long-term approach. This will result in long-term results and long-term benefits.

Smoking Cessation on the Curriculum at British Columbia University College

Health Units and Automakers Team Up to Offer Cessation Supports in the Workplace

Healthy Inside and Out

Section III: The HOW of Quitting Smoking in the Workplace

Carrying out smoking cessation activities in the workplace can be complex. The practical steps needed to successfully plan, develop, communicate and implement cessation activities are outlined below.

Understand the Process of Quitting Smoking

Smoking is a serious addiction and quitting is a difficult process. Most people make four or five quit attempts and may use a variety of methods before they quit for good. These attempts are an important part of the journey to becoming smoke-free. An attempt is not a failure. Smokers learn more about quitting each time they try, and the fact that they have tried to quit before increases the chances of them eventually quitting for good. If employees are supported each time they try to quit smoking they have a much better chance of getting quit and staying quit.

Adopt Positive Values

Workplaces that offer wellness activities already show they are committed to improving their employees’ health. Cessation activities that are built on the following values can be more effective and more attractive to all employees:

  • Open communications. Keep employees informed at all times. Let them know in advance if any policies or activities are being introduced or changed. Also, explain why and how policies are changing.
  • Respect. Be respectful of employees’ concerns and ideas.
  • Inclusiveness. Include employees in the decisions and the discussions. Keep them informed and encourage them to participate. Encourage both smokers and non-smokers to voice their opinions.
  • Non-stigmatizing. Use an approach that does not label or stigmatize smokers, and does not make non-smokers feel left out.
  • Privacy and confidentiality. Respect the privacy and confidentiality of smokers who want to take advantage of any cessation supports offered in the workplace.

The Stages of Quitting Smoking

«With small businesses, family-friendly practices are far more informal than those based on formal policies. When we talk about culture in a small business environment, it tends to be based on a sense of leadership, values, beliefs and principles. Some of it is based on return on investment, but for many, it’s also a sense of what’s right, what’s fair. Employers need to know in a very immediate way that how they treat their employees matters.»

— Dr. Donna Lero, Co-Founder,
Centre for Families, Work and Well-Being

Develop a Plan

Once the decision has been made to support employees to quit smoking, you need to develop a plan that details:

  • Goals and objectives — what you want to achieve and why.
  • An inventory of available resources -include what is available in the workplace and in the community.
  • A needs assessment — ask employees what they want.
  • Who is involved — identify the organizers and the target audience you want to reach.
  • Activities — what you are going to do and when.
  • Communication — including to whom, how often, and how.
  • Evaluation — looking at whether you have met your goals and objectives.

Draft Goals and Objectives

Setting down goals and objectives will make clear to everyone what you are trying to achieve and why. They will also help in the evaluation process to gauge the success of the cessation supports, and help you improve them in the future.

SMART objectives are ones that are:

Make an Inventory of Available Resources

This can include the budget you have for cessation activities, the time you can allot to it, and the people who will be able to help. If your workplace offers a benefit plan, check what it already offers and get in touch with your provider to see what else they can offer. Also look into what is offered in the community, for example through community health centres, public health department, authority or district, hospitals and other organizations. Refer to Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a checklist for assessing smoking cessation programs. Health Canada and other national and provincial health organizations offer a variety of resources for people who want to quit smoking.

Quitlines across the country also offer support for smokers and their friends and family members through trained cessation specialists, at no cost.

Refer to Section IV: Resources for a list of the quit-line numbers across the country.

Conduct a Needs Assessment

Before you decide what you want to do, you should get a feel for what employees want. You may already know from other surveys, needs assessments, or informal discussions that smoking cessation is high on the priority list at your workplace. What you may not know is what stage employees are at in the quitting process, or how they would like to quit. A needs assessment will help you find out more about how motivated employees are to quit, what will help them quit, and what they feel is standing in their way. Include questions for all employees, with some targeted specifically at non-smokers, and some at ex-smokers and smokers. For small workplaces, a needs assessment can be conducted through a staff meeting or other discussions.

Refer to Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a sample needs assessment. You can offer an incentive, such as a draw for a prize or other token reward to encourage all employees to participate in the survey. Also refer to the Health Canada document Workplace Health — Discovering the Needs, a guide for planning a needs assessment for workplace health programs. It is available at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/occup-travail/health-sante/program-programmes_2_e.html.

Decide Who Should be Involved

Everyone in the workplace should be represented in discussions around planning, developing, and implementing wellness activities. This will ensure that more people will support the activities and more people will participate. Setting up a committee to plan, manage activities and events, deal with volunteers, and communicate with employees is an effective way of ensuring any wellness initiative is a success. You will need to build a commitment with management, staff and labour groups, and identify champions and influential leaders to help get others on board. In small workplaces, all employees can be involved. In larger workplaces, try to involve the following (where appropriate):

  • Management — Although initiatives do not have to be driven by management, it is important for them to be involved from the beginning;
  • Unions;
  • Different departments and/or groups of workers;
  • Workplace wellness and health and safety representatives or medical staff;
  • Human resources;
  • Employee assistance program (EAP) representatives.

Choose Your Activities

Choosing your activities will depend on a variety of factors, including:

  • How motivated employees are to quit smoking. If many employees are not that interested in quitting smoking, more work may need to be done around information and education before group programs and quit medications are introduced.
  • The information gathered at the needs assessment stage, including the support employees have identified.
  • Available resources. Make sure you have the people, time and budget to do what you want to do. Remember that many activities can be done for little cost. Refer to Section IV: Resources for agencies and organizations that may be able to help.

«Smoking bans are the biggest challenge we have ever faced. The quit rate goes from 5 percent to 21 percent when smokers work in non-smoking environments.»

— handwritten Philip Morris memorandum,
Bates No. 2054893642

Smoking cessation activities and support can be offered on their own, but it is preferable if they are part of a larger wellness initiative. It is especially important to establish a strong tobacco control policy in the workplace to provide the supportive environment necessary for employees to quit smoking. All smoking paraphernalia such as ashtrays should be removed from the workplace. For information on how to implement a new non-smoking policy in the workplace, or to strengthen an existing one, refer to Health Canada’s Towards a Healthier Workplace: A Guidebook on Tobacco Control Policies. For information on how to implement workplace wellness initiatives, refer to Health Canada’s Workplace Health System.

Refer to Section IV: Resources for information on how to obtain these and other resources.

Communicate Well

When it comes to smoking cessation and other wellness initiatives, communication is extremely important for generating interest and encouraging employee participation. The following tips will help you communicate effectively and get your messages out.

Do it often and do it early. Make sure employees know about any changes to smoking policies and smoking cessation activities well in advance so they can plan, and keep employees informed every step of the way.

Communication is a two-way activity.
Encourage employees to get involved, allow them to participate in the discussion and listen to their opinions. Provide a forum or venue to solicit feedback.

Use a variety of channels. Take advantage of various channels to communicate information about the benefits of quitting, and about what cessation supports are available to employees. Large workplaces will have more options, but even small workplaces can take advantage of different means of communication, including:

  • word-of-mouth;
  • managers;
  • staff meetings;
  • posters;
  • written materials in staff and lunch rooms;
  • e-mail;
  • employee newsletters;
  • workplace intranets.

Evaluate

There are a number of good reasons to evaluate cessation activities:

  • to assess the effectiveness of the activities;
  • to identify ways to improve the activities;
  • to justify future activities.

Keeping Everyone in the Loop

There are three different types of evaluations:
Formative evaluations
— These are used for planning and include the needs assessment survey described earlier in this section. Refer to Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a sample employee needs assessment.

Process evaluations — These focus on activities that are underway, and can help you make adjustments to your initiatives. Use a process evaluation to gather employee feedback on the activities, resources, and support offered. Try to get feedback from smokers and non-smokers, management, and labour representatives. Refer to Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace for a sample process evaluation.

Summative evaluations — These try to answer the questions: «Did the activities make a difference?» and «Did the activities meet the goals and objectives?» This type of evaluation can track the number of employees who participate, track the quit rates at three months, six months and one year, and help you develop a cost-benefit analysis that looks at changes in absenteeism, increases in productivity, decreases in disability claims and insurance costs, and improved employee satisfaction and health.

Deal with Barriers

You may be faced with some challenges around cessation in the workplace. The following are some barriers you may face and some strategies for dealing with them.

Some employees are not ready to quit smoking

  • Some employees will be in the pre-contemplation stage in the quitting process — they won’t have any intention of quitting smoking in the short term. And although this means they may not take advantage of the cessation activities and benefits that are offered in the workplace, they can still be supported to start thinking about making changes in their smoking habits. Non-smoking policies in the workplace help people cut down by providing fewer opportunities to smoke. Having information readily available can also help get people thinking about quitting.
  • Cessation information, including contests and self-help material that is readily available can encourage people to start thinking about quitting smoking. Refer to Section IV: Resources for organizations that distribute self-help and other materials.
  • Peer support. Watching other employees as they quit smoking with the help of peer support can be encouraging to smokers.

What about employees who live with smokers?
Supporting employees in the workplace will help them quit smoking, but if they have family members who smoke at home, it will be more difficult for them to quit. Offer the same cessation supports and benefits to household family members.

What about managers who are not supportive?
Immediate supervisors are the gatekeepers when it comes to many workplace activities. Make sure managers are on board, because if they are supportive of wellness initiatives, staff members are more likely to participate.

Smoking at the workplace
Workplaces that allow smoking, even in designated areas, send a mixed message. A smoke-free environment helps employees cut down or quit smoking.

«The biggest thing we can do to help people stop smoking is to make it less convenient for them, and one of the ways to do this is to make workplaces 100 percent smoke-free.»

— Neil Mackenzie, Manager,
Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention,
Windsor-Essex County Health Unit

Steel Manufacturer Makes Strong Commitment to Health

Good Long-Term Forecast at Irving Paper: Business and Employee Health on the Rise

Shipshape Smoking Supports at Secunda Marine

Section IV: Resources

Also refer to Section VII: References for further background information about smoking cessation in the workplace, including other Health Canada references.

Health Canada

Health Canada offers a range of smoking cessation and other health promotion resources which are available online at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca. Hard copies can also be ordered through the Web site.

Health Canada Smoking Cessation Resources

On the Road to Quitting — This guide for smokers who want to quit is available in booklet form and online. It includes information about nicotine addiction, the health benefits of quitting smoking and dealing with stress, and it outlines practical steps for quitting. Strategies for dealing with relapses, slips, cravings and withdrawal are also outlined. It is available online at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca.

Towards a Healthier Workplace: A Guidebook on Tobacco Control Policies — This guidebook outlines the importance of workplace tobacco control policies and the practical steps for implementing them with case stories from workplaces across the country illustrating concrete examples. It also includes practical tools for employers and handouts for employees. It is available online at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca.

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www.gosmokefree.gc.ca — This Health Canada Web site contains comprehensive tobacco information including health effects of smoking and second-hand smoke, quit resources, Canadian smoking trend data, and information on the tobacco industry. Resources for professionals and the general public are available, including specific resources for youth.

Other Health Canada Resources

Corporate Health Model — A Guide to Developing and Implementing the Workplace Health System in Medium and Large Businesses. This guide provides an outline of the steps required to develop and implement a Workplace Health System using the Corporate Health Model. A workplace health system refers to the process of developing a comprehensive health program to help employees maintain or improve their health. It outlines the steps necessary to plan, develop, and implement a workplace health system. It is available online at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/occup-travail/work-travail/model-guide-modele/index_e.html and copies can also be ordered through the Web site.

Workplace Health — Discovering the Needs. This guide was developed for use by committees or coordinating groups to plan a needs assessment for workplace health programs. It is available online at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/occup-travail/work-travail/index_e.html workplace and copies can also be ordered through the Web site.

Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS). A national survey of over 20,000 Canadians, it is designed to provide timely, reliable and continual federal and provincial access to important information related to tobacco use in Canada, especially for populations most at risk for taking up smoking, such as 15- to 24-year-olds. Since February 1999, CTUMS has provided six-monthly and yearly data on changes in smoking status and amount smoked, both nationally and provincially. CTUMS is conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Health Canada. CTUMS is available at www.gosmokefree.gc.ca/ctums.

Resources for Youth

Some of the hyperlinks provided are to sites of organizations or other entities that are not subject to the Official Languages Act. The material found there is therefore in the language(s) used by the sites in question.

Quit4Life — Health Canada’s Quit4Life is designed to help Canadians between the ages of 12 and 18 quit smoking, including those who smoke occasionally. Using a four-step plan, the program helps build motivation and confidence and outlines tips for dealing with roadblocks and stress. It is available online at www.quit4life.ca, or as a booklet.

SMOKE-FX is a Web site that includes Ontario resources, tobacco quizzes, e-mail postcards, fact sheets, and an advocacy tool kit. It is available at www.smoke-fx.com.

The TeenNet Project is a University of Toronto Web-based research project that includes young people from diverse backgrounds in all stages of design, development, and dissemination. The main site is available at www.teennetproject.org and there are individual project sites such as CyberIsle (www.cyberisle.org) that includes health information, online discussion groups, links and games;

Smoke Free World (www.smokefreeworld.com) that focuses on tobacco and globalization;

Smoking Zine (www.smokingzine.org), a multilingual, five-stage, interactive smoking prevention and cessation resource for smokers and non-smokers.

Allumelagang.com is a French language youth-oriented Web site that includes cessation information, resources, a discussion forum, interactive games, and links. It is available at www.allumelagang.com.

Provincial Quitlines

Quitlines offer support for smokers who want to quit, may be thinking of quitting, have quit and need support, or enjoy smoking and do not want to stop. Trained cessation specialists can help them develop a structured plan, answer their questions and refer them to other smoking cessation services in their community. They can also provide support for family and friends who want to help a smoker. Self-help materials can be ordered through quitlines and there is no charge to use quitline counselling services.

  • Newfoundland and Labrador residents
    1-800-363-5864
  • New Brunswick and Nova Scotia residents
    1-877-513-5333
  • Prince Edward Island residents
    1-888-818-6300
  • Quebec residents
    1-866-527-7383
  • Ontario residents
    1-877-513-5333
  • Manitoba and Saskatchewan residents
    1-877-513-5333
  • Alberta residents
    1-866-332-2322
  • British Columbia residents
    1-877-455-2233
  • Yukon residents
    1-866-221-8393
  • Nunavut residents
    1-866-877-3845
  • Northwest Territories residents
    1-867-920-8826

National and Other Organizations

Some of the hyperlinks provided are to sites of organizations or other entities that are not subject to the Official Languages Act. The material found there is therefore in the language(s) used by the sites in question.

For further information and resources on smoking cessation, please contact any of the following:

Resources are also available by contacting the public health department, authority or district in your area.

Section V: Tools for Employers and Others Who Promote Health in the Workplace


These tools are to help employers and others who promote health in the workplace as they plan, develop and implement cessation activities for their employees. You may adapt them to suit your particular needs.

Employee Needs Assessment: Smoking Cessation in the Workplace

This is a sample employee needs assessment for gathering information about how workplaces can help employees quit smoking.

Estimating the Cost of Smoking in Your Workplace

Using a formula developed by the Conference Board of Canada and updated in 2006, this tool outlines how you can estimate the cost associated with smoking in the workplace in terms of increased absenteeism, decreased productivity, and providing commercial ashtrays for outside smoking areas and keeping these areas clean.

Smoking Cessation in the Workplace: Comparing the Different Approaches

The three basic approaches are outlined in Section II: The Why, Who and What of Quitting Smoking. These approaches are compared in a chart format, including the pros and cons associated with each.

Checklist for Assessing Smoking Cessation Programs

This tool includes questions to consider when choosing a cessation program for your workplace. Both program content and program leaders are considered.

Evaluation Tool

This tool is a sample evaluation questionnaire employees can be asked to fill out after they participate in a group program. It can also be modified to gather feedback about other cessation activities offered in the workplace.

Employee Needs Assessment: Smoking Cessation in the Workplace

Part A — About You

  • 1. I am (circle one):

3. Which of the following describes you best? (check one only)

  • I am a non-smoker.
  • I am an ex-smoker.
  • I am a smoker who would like to quit.
  • I am a smoker who does not want to quit.

Part B — Non-smoking Policies and Supports in the Workplace

  • 4. Are you aware of the smoking policy in our workplace? (circle one)

  • Yes
  • No

  • 5. Do you know where smoking is permitted in our workplace? (circle one)

    If yes, please explain.

    6. Do you know what cessation supports are available to employees? (circle one)

    If yes, please list the cessation supports you are aware of:

    If you are a non-smoker, this completes the questionnaire. Thank you. If you are a current smoker please continue to question 7a and if you are an ex-smoker, please go to question 7b.

    Part C — About Supporting People Who Want to Stop Smoking and Who Want to Stay Quit

    • 7a. For smokers: Would you like to quit smoking? (circle one)

    If yes, how soon?

    7b. For ex-smokers: How long ago did you quit?

    8. How many times in the past year have you quit smoking for at least 24 hours? (circle one)

    • None
    • One
    • or more

  • 9. Have you used any cessation supports in your previous attempts to quit smoking? (circle one)

    If yes, please describe the types of supports you have used (e.g., self-help materials, group cessation programs, quit-lines, doctor’s advice, counselling from a pharmacist, use of nicotine gum, use of the patch, prescription for Zyban™, etc.)

    10. Would you participate in smoking cessation assistance that was offered through our workplace? (circle one)

  • Not sure (please explain)
  • 11. What types of support and activities would you use to help you stop smoking or to help you stay smoke-free? (check as many as apply)

    • Group program offered on-site
    • Group program offered off-site
    • Brief, professional advice
    • One-on-one counselling
    • Quit medications (patch, nicotine gum, etc.)
    • Self-help information (brochures, Web sites, etc.)
    • Telephone quit-line
    • Contests and challenges
    • Health fairs
    • Lunch and learn sessions
    • Peer support
    • 100 percent smoke-free policy in the workplace
    • Other (please explain)

  • 12. What would stop you from participating in smoking cessation activities offered through our workplace?
    For example, cost, time, family members or spouses not being able to participate, etc. Please explain.

    Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. This information will assist us in planning cessation activities and supports.

    Estimating the Cost of Smoking in Your Workplace

    In 2006 the Conference Board of Canada updated a formula it had developed in 1997 to estimate the cost of smoking to a business or organization. According to this new information the estimated annual cost is up to $3,396 for each employee who smokes. This includes costs associated with increased absenteeism, decreased productivity, and providing commercial ashtrays for outside smoking areas and keeping these areas clean.

    Increased absenteeism

    The most recent Canadian research data indicate that smokers take two more sick leave days per year than their non-smoking counterparts. Calculating the cost of additional absenteeism is a matter of multiplying the difference between the annual number of sick days taken by smokers and non-smokers by the average daily per-employee payroll cost. The formula for calculating the additional absenteeism cost of smoking employees to employers is:

    COST Absent = DAYS LOST Smoker × DAILY WAGE ×
    (1 + BENEFITS and TAXES) = $323

    Decreased productivity

    The second part of the model examines the cost of cigarette breaks taken by smoking employees during the workday. This cost only applies to employees who are unable to smoke in their immediate work area and must travel to another location to have a cigarette. But because of new municipal bylaws and stronger provincial legislation prohibiting smoking in public places and workplaces this cost now applies to a large majority of employees who smoke.

    It is assumed that on average smokers consume five cigarettes in an eight-hour workday and that three of these are consumed during employer-sanctioned breaks. In terms of lost productivity it is assumed smokers take two smoking breaks on time not sanctioned by employers as rest time. Also, given the increased bans on smoking in public places it is also reasonable to assume that smoking breaks now take longer as employees usually have to travel longer to a location where they are permitted to smoke. In total each smoking employee now spends 40 minutes every day (two 20-minute breaks) consuming cigarettes outside sanctioned rest time.

    The average hourly wage, combined with payroll taxes and benefits is used to calculate the cost of extra smoking breaks to employers using the following formula:

    COST Prod =
    CIGS × (TIME ÷ MINUTES) × WAGE Average ×
    (1 + BENEFITS and TAXES) × DAYS WORKED
    = $3,053

    Smoking facilities costs

    Because smoking is now banned in most public places very few workplaces offer designated smoking rooms or other indoor areas. Workplaces no longer have to incur the associated costs of insuring, cleaning, maintaining and ventilating these spaces. In an effort to encourage their employees to quit smoking, most organizations also do not install expensive outdoor shelters but some do install industrial ashtrays outside.

    The costs to employers for smoking facilities include purchasing and replacing a limited number of commercial ashtrays and cleaning them as well as the surrounding area. The formula for calculating these costs is:

    Formula 1 (Ashtrays)

    Ashtray = [($ ASHTRAY) ÷ (ASHDURA)] ÷ SMOKE-EMP = $8.50

    Formula 2 (Cleaning time)

    ASHCLEAN =
    [(CLEANTIME÷MINUTES) × WAGECLEAN × (1 + BENEFITS and TAXES) × WORKYEAR]
    ÷ SMOKE-EMP
    = $11.34

    Total smoking facilities Costs
    ASHTRAY + ASHCLEAN = $20

    (Source: The Conference Board of Canada, 2006.)

    Smoking Cessation in the Workplace: Comparing the Different Approaches

    As outlined in Section II: The WHY, WHO and WHAT of Quitting Smoking in the Workplace there are three basic approaches for smoking cessation supports in the workplace and a variety of options. Below is a chart comparing the various approaches by detailing the pros and cons associated with each. The gold standard for supporting smoking cessation in the workplace is to offer all three approaches and incorporate activities into a broader wellness initiative.

    Comprehensive
    Offering programs and activities at the workplace

    Facilitated
    Working with outside agencies to deliver programs and activities off-site, and providing self-help materials

    Education and Information
    Providing employees with information including self-help materials

    Approach Pro Con
    • More accessible.
    • More flexible (e.g., can be offered at various times to accommodate shift and other workers).
    • Sends a strong message of commitment and support from employer.
    • Demonstrates employer’s leadership.
    • May provide additional motivation.
    • Can be offered to spouses and family members.
    • Easy to target hard-to-reach groups.
    • Supports ex-smokers.
    • Can provide follow-up and support.
    • Can integrate cessation supports into existing workplace wellness initiatives.
    • Can build on existing tobacco control policies.
    • High costs, in terms of financial and human resources.
    • Group programs may not suit all employees.
    • Extensive training may be required.
    • Does not allow for anonymity.
    • May not accommodate different levels of addiction and readiness to quit.
    • There may be more and broader expertise and resources in the community.
    • Focussing on smokers in the workplace may stigmatize them and decrease success rates.
    • Offers anonymity.
    • Makes use of external expertise, which means not «re-inventing the wheel» and ensures a level of expertise that may not exist within a workplace.
    • Employees can select the options that work best for them.
    • Some communities have a variety of options to choose from and many resources (especially larger centres).
    • Sends a message of commitment and support from employer.
    • Less accessible.
    • May be high cost in terms of human resources at the outset.
    • Less flexible.
    • Less easy to tailor to specific workplaces.
    • There may be fees.
    • Finding acceptable options may be difficult.
    • Low cost.
    • Better than no support at all if this is all that can be done.
    • All workplaces can take this approach.
    • Offers anonymity.
    • Good option for highly motivated smokers.
    • The quit rates are lower for self-help.
    • Education and information is not enough to change behaviour.
    • Lacks ongoing support.
    • Shows a lower level of support from employer.
    • Employees may not feel they are able to quit successfully on their own and this can be a barrier to action.
    • Follow-up is not possible.

    Checklist for Assessing Smoking Cessation Programs

    If you are going to establish an in-house program or partner with an outside agency, there are some factors you may want to consider:

    • Can the program be offered at times and in locations that are convenient for your employees?
    • Will the program suit your employees’ personalities and styles of learning?
    • Do the program leaders recognize that not all smokers are at the same stage in the quitting process? Can they modify their approach accordingly?
    • Has the program been evaluated and does it have a proven (but not exaggerated) success rate based on a thorough three-and six-month follow-up?
    • Is the program offered by or associated with a credible organization?
    • Is there sufficient follow-up and support?

    Consider asking the following questions about the program content and its leaders (the more «yes» answers the better).

    Does the program:

    • Help the smoker deal with the physical addiction of smoking?
    • Incorporate the use of quit medications?
    • Help the smoker deal with the psychological addiction of smoking?
    • Help the smoker deal with the social nature of smoking?
    • Prepare the smoker for a future without cigarettes?
    • Reinforce the smoker’s motivation to quit?
    • Provide tips to control urges to smoke?
    • Make use of the special support systems and other wellness activities in the workplace?
    • Provide information about stress management, physical activity and nutrition?

    Are the program leaders:

    • Knowledgeable about behaviour change in general and smoking cessation in particular?
    • Supportive and genuinely interested in helping people quit smoking?
    • Do a reference check. Call other health organizations to ask about the program and speak with people who have participated in the program.

    Do a reference check. Call other health organization to ask about the program and speak with people who have participated in the program.

    (Source: Adapted from Selecting Smoking Cessation Programs: A Manager’s Guide, Health Canada.)

    Evaluation Tool

      How did you hear about the program? (Please check all that apply)

    • newsletter
    • manager
    • staff meeting
    • e-mail message
    • bulletin boards
    • word-of-mouth
    • ccupational health and safety nurse or other health promoter in the workplace
    • other (please explain)

  • What was your goal when you joined the group? (check one only)

    • stop smoking
    • reduce smoking
    • other (please explain)

  • Did your goal change as you went through the program? (circle one)

    If yes, how did it change? Please explain.

    Are you smoke-free today? (circle one)

    If yes, please skip to question 8; if no, please continue.

    Why do you think you started smoking again or did not quit?
    Please explain.

    Are you thinking about quitting smoking again?

    • Within 1 year
      • Yes
      • No
    • Within 6 months
      • Yes
      • No
    • Within 1 month
      • Yes
      • No

  • Was the program offered at a time and location that were convenient? Please explain.

    Which tools, techniques or resources did you find useful? (Please check all that apply)

    • group leader
    • breathing/relaxation exercise
    • positive self-talks
    • handouts and self-help material (please specify)
    • telephone quit-line
    • group discussions
    • contest
    • buddy system
    • quit medications (please list)
    • other (please specify)

  • Is there anything you would suggest adding or changing about the program?

    Was there anything else that you found helpful that was not part of the program?


    How many sessions did you attend?
    session(s) of

    What will you remember most about the program?

    Would you recommend the program to other people? (circle one)

    • Yes
    • No

  • Would you be interested in volunteering to help with other cessation activities or workplace wellness initiatives?
    If yes, on a separate piece of paper please write your name and phone number and give it to your group leader. (circle one)

    Thank you for completing this evaluation form. And congratulations on your decision to become smoke-free!

    (Source: Adapted from Stop Smoking: A Program for Women.)

    Section VI: Handouts for Employees

    These handouts are designed to provide employees with information about quitting smoking. They can be photocopied and distributed at meetings or through internal mail, posted on notice boards or put in pay envelopes.

    Health Benefits of Quitting Smoking

    This handout spells out the immediate and longer-term benefits of quitting smoking. It can be used to help motivate employees to take advantage of on-site or community-based smoking cessation programs and resources.

    10 Ways to Help a Friend Quit Smoking

    This handout describes 10 ways to help people who are in the process of becoming smokefree. It is intended to help increase support for employees who want to quit smoking.

    Dealing with Withdrawal

    This handout outlines the most common withdrawal symptoms and suggests ways of coping with them.

    Dealing with Cravings

    The times, places and situations that can trigger the urge to smoke are outlined as well as some strategies for coping with them. A sample daily record is included to help people keep track of their triggers and cravings.

    Tips for Cutting Down or Quitting Smoking

    This handout includes a list of quick tips to help people cut down or quit smoking and a table to fill out the advantages and disadvantages associated with quitting.

    Slips and Relapse — Learning from Them and Getting Back on Track

    The difference between a slip and a relapse are explained in this handout, as well as tips for coping with each and getting back on track. Also included are some ideas for developing a plan to prevent slips and relapse.

    The Five Stages of Quitting

    The five stages of quitting are outlined to allow smokers to identify where they are in the quitting process.

    What Would You Buy?

    This handout encourages people to figure out how much they will save when they quit smoking over days, weeks, months, and years. It also includes a section for them to fill out what they will buy with the money they will save.

    Top 10 Reasons to Stop Smoking

    A top 10 list of reasons to stop smoking, with space for people to add their own reasons.

    Health Benefits of Quitting Smoking

    Quitters immediately begin to reduce the risks of developing heart disease, cancer and breathing problems. Former smokers live longer than those who continue to smoke. For example, those who quit before age 50 have only half the chance of dying from a smoking-related disease in the next 15 years compared with those who continue to smoke.

    Your body will start to heal within 24 hours of quitting.

    • 20 minutes after quitting, your blood pressure drops to your pre-cigarette level.
    • 8 hours after quitting, the carbon monoxide in your blood drops to normal and the oxygen level in your blood increases to normal.
    • 24 hours after quitting, you lower your chances of having a heart attack.
    • 48 hours after quitting, your sense of smell and taste improve and begin to return to normal.

    In the months and years to come, your body continues to recover.

    • 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting, your circulation improves and your lungs work better. (Try taking the stairs now!)
    • 9 months after quitting, you experience less coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue and shortness of breath.
    • 1 year after quitting, your risk of heart disease is about half of what it would have been if you had continued to smoke.
    • 5 years after quitting, your risk of stroke is greatly reduced. Within 5 to 15 years after quitting, it becomes about the same as a non-smoker’s risk.
    • 10 years after quitting, your risk of dying from lung cancer is about half of what it would have been if you had continued to smoke. Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas also decreases.
    • 15 years after quitting, your risk of heart disease is the same as a person who never smoked.

    Over half the people who have ever smoked in Canada have quit.

    You can too!

    (Source: Adapted from materials from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca, the Program Training and Consultation Centre, and the Alberta Tobacco Reduction Alliance.)

    10 Ways to Help a Friend Quit Smoking

    People who smoke need support and understanding when they are struggling to become smoke-free. Here are 10 ways you can help.

    1. Ask how you can help. Make yourself available as much as possible, especially during the first few days.
    2. Be patient. Most people who quit smoking experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms usually peak within 48 hours, but might last as long as four weeks. Be especially understanding during this time.
    3. Listen. Don’t preach or counsel; Just listen. Hostility and irritability can be a normal — and temporary — part of the withdrawal process. Encourage him to talk about his feelings.
    4. Encourage her to seek help. Suggest she participate in smoking cessation activities at work or in the community and that she ask her doctor or the workplace nurse for help. Encourage her to use self-help materials available at work or from community agencies such as the Lung Association or the Cancer Society.
    5. Help him avo >(Source: Adapted from materials from the Program Training and Consultation Centre and the Alberta Tobacco Reduction Alliance.)

    Dealing with Withdrawal

    When you stop smoking, your brain and body begin the process of healing themselves. At the beginning of the quitting process, some people experience symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, and this is part of the recovery process. For most people, withdrawal is at its worst one day after they stop smoking. It starts to get better after three or four days. After a week to 10 days, all withdrawal symptoms should be gone.

    Because the symptoms are most intense in the first few days after you stop, this is when you are most likely to start smoking again. Therefore, it is important to find positive ways to cope. Your main task in quitting is to find a way to get through the first few days. If you do, you have a much better chance of succeeding for good.

    If you expect your withdrawal symptoms to be severe, consider using a quit medication that does not require a prescription such as the nicotine patch or nicotine gum. Bupropion (brand name Zyban™) is a prescription medication that may help reduce withdrawal symptoms.

    Here are some of the most common withdrawal symptoms and some ideas for coping with them:

    Withdrawal symptoms Suggestions for coping
    Tension, irritability Go for a walk, take deep breaths.
    Depression Use positive self-talk. Speak to a friend or family member. Speak with your doctor if your depression is intense or does not go away.
    Headaches Take a mild pain reliever.
    Dizziness Sit or lie down until it passes.
    Trouble sleeping Take a hot bath or do relaxation exercises before bed. Avoid caffeine. Do not nap during the day.
    Difficulty concentrating Avoid additional stress. Take a brisk walk. Break bigger projects into smaller tasks and take regular breaks.
    Coughing Drink plenty of water. Use soothing lozenges.
    Hunger Eat balanced meals. Eat healthy, low-fat snacks such as fresh fruit and vegetables. Drink plenty of water.
    Constipation Drink plenty of water. Eat high-fibre foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grain cereals.

    (Source: Adapted from materials from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax and Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.)

    Dealing with Cravings

    There are times, places and situations that will trigger the urge to smoke, even after you have stopped feeling withdrawal symptoms. It is important to be aware of what triggers your cravings and have some strategies for coping with them.

    Some common triggers include:

    • coffee or alcohol;
    • other people smoking;
    • first thing in the morning;
    • after school or work;
    • talking on the phone;
    • driving in the car;
    • after eating;
    • at parties;
    • stress;
    • anger;
    • feeling lonely or sad;
    • feeling bored.

    Try using the 4 Ds

    • Drink plenty of water — between 6 and 8 glasses per day.
    • Delay for 5 to 7 minutes. The urge should pass.
    • Do something else.
    • Deep breathing.

    Daily Record

    Keep a daily record form, using it to keep track of:

    1. what happens to you around cigarettes;
    2. what makes you crave a cigarette;
    3. what you do to follow your quitting plan.

    Tips for Keeping Track

    • Write things down when they happen, not later.
    • Be accurate. Try to write down the details every time a situation happens.
    • Keep your notes simple. Filling the form out has to fit in with your usual habits.
    Here’s an example of the information you can collect to help you with your plan.

    Trigger Behaviour/Actions/Thoughts/Emotions Consequence
    When did it happen? Did you resist the urge to smoke? What did you do?
    Did one of your strategies work?
    What happened as a result?
    Who was there? If you gave into the urge, describe what happened.
    Did you have more than one?
    Was it pleasant or unpleasant?
    What were you doing? What did you say to yourself? How did you feel?
    What were you saying to yourself? What were you thinking? What did you say to yourself?
    What were you thinking? What were you feeling? What did you think after?
    What mood were you in? What did you do? How do you feel about what you did?

    Daily Record

    • Trigger
    • Behaviour/Actions/Thoughts/Emotions
    • Consequence

    Date:

    Other ways to cope with cravings include:

    • In the short term, stay away from social situations where others will be smoking, and ask friends not to smoke around you.
    • Keep your home, car and workplace smoke-free.
    • Avo >(Source: Adapted from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax and Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto.)

    Tips for Cutting Down or Quitting Smoking

    Use the following for-and-against list to outline the short-and long-term advantages to quitting smoking. In one column write down the advantages for smoking and in the other your reasons for quitting. Keep in mind the advantages and disadvantages to your health, family, friends, finances, self-esteem, and emotional well-being. Refer to the list from time to time to remind yourself of why you are quitting.

    Advantages of Quitting

      Short-Term Advantages of Quitting

  • Long-Term Advantages of Quitting
  • Disadvantages of Quitting

      Short-Term Disadvantages of Quitting

  • Long-Term Disadvantages of Quitting
  • Other tips for cutting down or quitting smoking

    • Write down your plan for quitting, which can include your reasons, potential pitfalls, stages of progress, and how you’ll deal with temptations.
    • Think positively, especially by focusing on one day at a time and on each of your achievements.
    • Be sure to ask for help and support from those around you. Having at least one friend you can count on and share your feelings with may improve your chances of quitting for good. If your partner smokes, see if you can encourage him or her to join you on your journey.
    • Decide whether you’re going to quit cold turkey or gradually, and what kind of professional support services you want to use, if any. You may want to consider counselling, group programs or nicotine replacement therapies.
    • Learn about and prepare yourself for possible withdrawal symptoms.
    • If you slip, don’t be too hard on yourself. Keep focused on sticking to your quit plan. Look at what triggered the lapse and figure out how to handle it differently next time. A slip or two does not mean you’ve failed in your effort to quit.
    • Don’t worry about weight gain, it doesn’t happen to everyone and is often insignificant when it does. Control it by sticking to the same diet you usually eat, choosing low-calorie snacks, and by increasing exercise and physical activity.
    • If you experience cravings, try the four Ds: Drink water, Delay, Do something else, and Deep breathing.

    If you believe you’re someone who smokes to deal with stress, look into new ways of coping; there are many. Tips for dealing with stress can be found on Health Canada’s Web site www.gosmokefree.gc.ca.

    (Source: Adapted from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca.)

    Slips and Relapse — Learning from Them and Getting Back on Track

    Slips

    A slip is when you have a cigarette or two after you have quit smoking. It is not uncommon for people who are trying to quit to have an occasional slip. Because smoking can be so automatic, you may not even be consciously aware that you’ve smoked until after you’ve finished.

    A slip or two does not mean that you have failed. If you slip, the best thing to do is to keep it minor, and go back to quitting as soon as you can. Look at what led up to the slip and figure out how to handle it differently next time. A slip will not prevent you from quitting successfully -you just have to get back on track.

    Tips for preventing slips:

    • Reinforce why you want to quit.
    • Continue positive self-talk; do not get discouraged.
    • Get help and support from friends.
    • Ride out the temptation; the urge passes quickly.
    • Look at what caused you to smoke and how you plan to get back on track.
    • Develop a plan to deal with the situation in the future.

    Relapse

    A relapse is when you start smoking again on a regular basis. A relapse will not prevent you from quitting successfully. Quitting smoking is a process and most people make more than one quit attempt before they quit for good. Don’t feel discouraged. As long as you learn something positive with each quit attempt, you will be further ahead than before you made the attempt. Relapse only becomes a negative thing if you let it get you down.

    How to overcome relapses:

    • Do not beat yourself up.
    • Think of the relapse as a learning experience and one more step in your journey to becoming smoke-free.
    • Be proud of the time you were smoke-free.
    • Start planning a new quit attempt right away, including developing a plan to prevent relapse.

    Plan to Prevent Slips and Relapse

    The key to staying smoke-free is to be aware of the people, places, situations, thoughts, and emotions that trigger you to smoke. Then plan ahead what you will do to cope with each trigger. You may have to keep thinking about your triggers for a long time after you quit because some situations, especially unexpected ones such as crises, can catch you by surprise. If you figure out ahead of time how you will deal with difficult situations, you are more likely to stay quit.

    This is how it works

    Identify your high-risk situations.

    Identify ways you could cope with each trigger situation and write it down. Keep this as a written action plan. Try to think of a three-way strategy for each situation:

    1. What will you tell yourself? It helps to have this written on a small card that you carry with you.
    2. Who will you ask for help and what type of help can you ask for?
    3. What will you do?

    Rehearse each situation ahead of time so it doesn’t feel awkward. Rehearsing puts your coping plan in the front of your mind.

    Review the plan often to keep it fresh in your mind.

    When you find yourself in the trigger situations, put your plan into action.

    Write down what happened and how you did with a daily record form (refer to the Dealing with Cravings handout for an example of a daily record form). If you resist the urge to smoke using your plan, your confidence will go up and you will know what strategies work for you. If you can’t resist the urge to smoke, review what happened and revise your plan to deal with the difficulties.

    (Source: Adapted from materials from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca and Capital District Health Authority.)

    The Five Stages of Quitting

    Quitting usually happens in five stages. People can move from one stage to another in order, but they can also move back and forth between the various stages before they quit for good. Again, a slip is not a failure, but an important part of the learning and quitting process. Most smokers try to quit several times before they succeed and the chance of success increases every time they try to quit. What stage are you at?

    • Stage One (Pre-contemplation): I’m not thinking about quitting, at least not in the next six months. In this stage, you may feel it is hopeless to even think about trying to quit smoking. You may even feel your smoking is not a problem.
    • Stage Two (Contemplation): I’m thinking about quitting someday, but not right now. In this stage, you know that you have a behaviour you wish to change and are trying to figure out how to do that.
    • Stage Three (Preparation): I want to quit within the next month or two, and I want to know more about how to do it. By now, you are ready to plan your quit program and to set a specific quit date.
    • Stage Four (Action): I have just quit and I am going through withdrawal. My body is reacting in uncomfortable ways. This can be a tough stage. You may have been through withdrawal before but started smoking again. Hang in there. If you do slip and have a puff, just forget about it and continue with your plan to quit.
    • Stage Five (Maintenance): I have quit smoking and I want to know more about how to never smoke again. Some people find this the hardest stage of all. You’ve reached your goal, but you have to really work at staying smokefree for good.


    (Source: Adapted from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.ca.)

    What Would You Buy?

    What would you do with the money you would save if you quit smoking? Use the chart below to figure out what you would buy if you did not buy cigarettes for the next 10 years. In the second column put in the amount you spend on cigarettes starting at 1 day and ending with 10 years. For example, if you smoke one pack a day and each pack is $7.00, in one day you would save $7.00, in one week you would save $49.00 ($7.00 × 7 days) and in one month (4 weeks) you would save $196.00 ($49.00 × 4 weeks).

    If you and your partner both smoke, fill out the table for both of you to see what you could buy if you combined your cigarette money.

    • Time
      • 1 day
      • 1 week
      • 2 weeks
      • 3 weeks
      • 4 weeks (1 month)
      • 2 months
      • 3 months
      • 4 months
      • 5 months
      • 6 months
      • 1 year
      • 2 years
      • 5 years
      • 10 years
    • Amount spent on cigarettes
    • What would you buy?

    Source: Adapted from Health Canada’s www.gosmokefree.gc.ca.)

    Top 10 Reasons to Stop Smoking

    1. Better health. Improved health is the number one reason to quit smoking. As soon as you quit your body starts to heal itself.
    2. Better breathing. Smoking affects your breathing — the longer you smoke the harder it is to breathe.
    3. Personal appearance. Quitting will improve personal appearance by reducing bad breath, yellow teeth and fingers, and prematurely aging skin.
    4. Role model for children. Be a positive role model for your own children, and for everyone else’s children.
    5. No more second-hand smoke. If you quit smoking you will help protect your friends and family from the dangers of second-hand smoke.
    6. Better smell. When you quit smoking, your sense of smell will increase and everything will smell better — including yourself, your house and your car.
    7. Fewer places to smoke. With increased smoking restrictions in public places, including workplaces, there are fewer places to smoke these days.
    8. Smoking is expensive. You will save hundreds or thousands of dollars each year if you quit smoking.
    9. Smoking is a fire hazard.
    10. It is never too late to quit smoking. If you have tried to quit before, take this as a positive sign, not a failure. It often takes several quit attempts to quit for good — each time you try to quit smoking you are closer to your goal.
      Keep trying and don’t get discouraged!

    Add your own reasons for quitting smoking to the list:

    Section VII: References

    This section includes a list of many of the documents that were part of the literature review that guided the development of this resource. They are organized according to topic for ease of reference.

    Health Canada References and Resources

    Health Canada provides a variety of resources and reference materials around tobacco control issues including policy information and cessation resources for individuals and professionals. The Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS) provides timely, reliable and continual data on tobacco use and related issues, including changes in smoking status. Also refer to Section IV: Resources for other Health Canada resources.

    • 1994 Youth Smoking Survey: Technical Report — Chapters 9 and 10. Ottawa: Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada. Health Canada, 1997.
    • Toward a Healthy Future Second Report on the Health of Canadians. Ottawa: Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada. Health Canada, 1999.
    • Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS). www.gosmokefree.gc.ca/ctums
    • Towards a Healthier Workplace: A Guidebook on Tobacco Control Policies. Ottawa: Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada. Health Canada, 2003.
    • A «how-to» for health and business success. HealthWorks. Health Promotion and Programs Branch, Health Canada, 1999.
    • Health Canada. Literature Review: Evaluations of Workplace Health Promotion Programs. Health Promotion and Programs Branch, Population Health Directorate, Adult Health Division, Health Canada.
    • Health Canada. Program Evaluation Manual. Key Issues and Strategies for Evaluating Your Workplace Health Promotion Program. Workplace Health System, Health Promotion and Programs Branch, Population Health Directorate, Adult Health Division, Health Canada.

    The Desire to Quit Smoking and Cessation Activities at Work

    The following resources provide information around who wants to quit smoking and the desire for cessation support at work. Also refer to the above section for Health Canada resources for additional information.

    • Canadian Fitness and Research Lifestyle Institute (1995). Smokers interested in workplace quitting programs. Lifestyle Tips. www.cflri.ca
    • Millar, W. (1997). Reaching smokers with Lower Educational Attainment. Canadian Social Trends, Summer: 18-23.
    • Moskowitz, J. (2001). The Impact of Smoking Ordinances in California on Smoking Cessation. American Journal of Public Health, 90: 757-61.

    The Case for Supporting Cessation in the Workplace

    The following references outline the key reasons for supporting smoking cessation in the workplace, including better health, reduced costs, better business, employee satisfaction, effectiveness and a positive image.

    • Bialous, S. and S. Glantz (1997). Tobacco Control in Arizona. Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California. Access date: 8 August 2001.
    • Bourns, B. and A. Malcomson (2001). Economic impact analysis of the non-smoking bylaw on the hospitality industry in Ottawa: KPMG.
    • Canadian Lifestyle and Research Institute (1995). Kicking the Habit at Work. The Research File. Reference No. 95 — Supplementary.
    • Canadian Lung Association (Summer 1999). Beyond the Smoke-Free Workplace. Secondwind.
    • Cancer Care Nova Scotia (date unknown). Cost of Tobacco in Your Workplace. Cancer Care Nova Scotia: Halifax.
    • Center for Prevention and Health Services (2003). Reducing the Burden of Smoking on Employee Health and Productivity. Issue Brief, Volume 1, Number 5.
    • Doll, R., R. Peto, K. Wheatley, et al. (1994). Mortality in relation to smoking: 40 years’ observations on male British doctors. British Medical Journal, 309:901-911.
    • Henningfield, J., R. Fant, J. Gitchell, et al. (2000). Tobacco dependence. Global public health potential for new medications development and indications. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 909:247-256
    • Moher, M., K. Hey, and T. Lancaster (2004). Workplace Interventions for Smoking Cessation (Cochrane Review). Cochrane Library, Issue 1.
    • Professional Assisted Cessation Therapy (PACT) (2003). Employers’ Smoking Cessation Guide. Practical Approaches to a Costly Workplace Problem. Second edition. www.endsmoking.org
    • Single, E., L. Robson, X. Xie, J. Rehm, et al. (1996). The Costs of Substance Abuse in Canada — Highlights. Ottawa: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse.
    • Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia (WCB) (1999). Lost Lives: Work-Related Deaths in British Columbia, 1999. www.worksafebc.com
    • World Bank Health, Nutrition and Population Web site at World Bank Group, Health, Nutrition and Population (2002). Smoke-free workplaces (PDF Version — 110 K). [Fact sheet] http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTPHAAG/Resources/AAGSmokeFreeWorkplaces.pdf

    Legislation Across the Country

    This report reviews legislative protection from second-hand smoke in federal and provincial jurisdictions.

    • Collishaw, N. and H. Meldrum (2003). Protection from Second-Hand Smoke in Canada: Applying Health Science to Occupational Health and Safety Law. Ottawa: Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada.

    The Cost of Implementing Cessation Activities in the Workplace

    The following references outline some of the costs associated with implementing smoking cessation activities in the workplace.

    • Borland, R., S. Chapman, N. Owen, et al. (1990). Effects of workplace smoking bans on cigarette consumption. American Journal of Public Health, 80(2); 178-180.
    • Canadian Lung Association (Summer 1999). Beyond the Smoke-Free Workplace. Secondwind.
    • Conference Board of Canada (2006). Smoking and the Bottom Line: Updating the Costs of Smoking in the Workplace. Ottawa, ON: Conference Board of Canada.
    • DePaul, J.L., T. Lesowitz, et al. (1989). A Worksite Smoking Cessation Intervention Involving the Media and Incentives. American Journal of Community Psychology, 17:785-99.
    • Depaul, J.L., S. McMahon, D. Salina, et al. (1994). Assessing a Smoking Cessation Intervention Involving Groups, Incentives, and Self-help Manuals. Behavior Therapy. 26:393-408.
    • Erfurt, J., A. Foote, M. Heirich, et al. (1991). Worksite Wellness Programs: Incremental Comparison of Screening and Referral Alone, Health Education, Follow-up Counselling, and Plant Organization. Journal of Occupational Medicine, 33:962-70.
    • Jeffery, R., D. Hennrikus, H. Lando, et al. (1993). The Smoking Cessation Process: Longitudinal Observations in a Working Population. Preventive Medicine, 24:235-244.
    • Moher, M., K. Hey, and T. Lancaster, (2004). Workplace Interventions for Smoking Cessation (Cochrane Review). Cochrane Library, Issue 1.
    • Windsor, R. and J. Lowe (1989). Behavioral Impact and Cost Analysis of a Worksite Self-Help Smoking Cessation Program. Progress in Clinical and Biological Research, 293:231-242.

    Benefits to Workplaces

    The following resources outline some of the benefits to workplaces that offer smoking cessation supports to their employees. Also refer to the above section on Health Canada references and resources for further information.

    • Professional Assisted Cessation Therapy (PACT) (2003). Employers’ Smoking Cessation Guide. Practical Approaches to a Costly Workplace Problem. Second edition. www.endsmoking.org
    • The Hartford Loss Control Tips, Smoking Cessation: Worksite Programs www.thehartford.com/corporate/losscontrol

    Workplaces as Effective Settings

    The following resources explain why workplaces are an ideal setting for helping people quit smoking.

    • Centres for Disease Control (2000). Work, Smoking, and Health: A NIOSH Scientific Workshop. Washington: Centres for Disease Control.
    • Moher, M., K. Hey, and T. Lancaster (2004) Workplace Interventions for Smoking Cessation (Cochrane Review). Cochrane Library, Issue 1.

    Cessation Interventions, Including Approaches and Options

    The following resources highlight important issues to consider when implementing cessation activities, and outline the available options and approaches.

    • Centres for Disease Control (2000). Work, Smoking, and Health: A NIOSH Scientific Workshop. Washington: Centres for Disease Control.
    • Coleman, T. (2004). ABC of Smoking Cessation, Use of Simple Advice and Behavioural Support. British Medical Journal Clinical Review, 328:631-633.
    • Grigg, M. and H. Glasgow (2003). Subsidised nicotine replacement therapy. Tobacco Control. 12:238-239.
    • Henningfield, J. (2000). Tobacco dependence treatment: scientific challenges; public health opportunities. Tobacco Control, 9(Suppl 1): i3-i10 (Spring).
    • Lancaster, T. and L. Stead (1999). Review: self-help interventions alone minimally increase smoking cessation rates. Evidence-Based Nursing, 2(3): 80.
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health (1996). Making your Workplace Smoke-Free: A Decision Maker’s Guide. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health.

    Establishing Cessation Activities

    This section includes further information around establishing cessation activities in the workplace including design steps and successful intervention strategies.

    • Center for Prevention and Health Services (2003). Reducing the Burden of Smoking on Employee Health and Productivity. Issue Brief, Volume 1, Number 5.
    • Professional Assisted Cessation Therapy (PACT) (2003). Employers’ Smoking Cessation Guide. Practical Approaches to a Costly Workplace Problem. Second edition. www.endsmoking.org
    • The Hartford Loss Control Tips, Smoking Cessation: Worksite Programs. www.thehartford.com/ corporate/losscontrol
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health (1996). Making your Workplace Smoke-Free: A Decision Maker’s Guide. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health.
    • U.S. Office of Personnel Management (date unknown). Guidance on Establishing Programs Designed to Help Employees Stop Smoking. www.opm.gov/ehs/smokgud3.asp

    Tailoring Cessation Efforts to Different Workplace Settings

    The following resources include information on tailoring cessation activities to different workplace settings. Also refer to the above section on Health Canada references and resources for further information, including Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey and Towards a Healthier Workplace: A Guidebook on Tobacco Control Policies.

    CIPD Employee Engagement Conference

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    Incentives and Benefits for Greater Employee Engagement

    12 Ways to Increase Employee Engagement and Productivity

    In a perfect world, employees would arrive at work each day with bright smiles on their faces, eager to be productive and engaged with their colleagues. But, the sad truth is that a vast number of employees are either disengaged or on their way out of the organization. According to Gallup Poll, nearly 66 percent of all employees are disengaged, leaving only about one-third of the workforce actively participating in their jobs at full production. This averages out to hundreds of billions of dollars a year in lost production.

    Why Employees Become Disengaged

    The reasons for employee disengagement vary from one workplace to another, but most of the time it stems from:

    • Poor working conditions or jobs that place too much strain on employees’ physical and mental well-being
    • Low salaries and limited employee benefit programs that don’t offer much in terms of compensation
    • The inability to provide meaningful tasks, rewarding projects or upward mobility in careers
    • Long-term problems with poor management practices and other negative corporate culture norms

    Incentives and Benefits for Engagement

    Fortunately, employers can use targeted incentives and benefits to vastly improve employee happiness and engagement in most workplaces. Along with programs to reduce tension and poor management practices, incentives and benefits can be used to boost employee morale and engagement at work. A Towers and Watson report advises that companies should place their focus on sustainable engagement in order to see the best results over the long term. The three critical elements of sustainable engagement include:

    • Engagement: Determining how committed employees are to the company and creating measures to increase the intensity levels of indiv >

    Therefore, when a company wants to develop more employee engagement, they must first start by examining the above elements and making positive changes at the operations management level. Only then can incentives and benefits alter employee performance and happiness.

    Some examples of employee benefits and incentives that can positively impact the organization, and employee engagement, include the following:

    Everyone can benefit from taking a little time off once in a while. Organizations that want to support a happier workforce understand this, therefore they provide flexible time off policies that add to the overall work-life balance. Want to take it up a notch? Provide travel discounts, working vacations and group day outings to allow employees to blow off steam.

    Company Ownership and Profit Sharing

    When employees can experience the rewards of business profitability, this can be a powerful incentive for them to hustle at work. Therefore, adding a company stock ownership or profit sharing program can be a big benefit.

    Retirement Savings Plans

    With thousands of Baby Boomers leaving the workforce daily, the need for strong retirement savings plans is high on the list of priorities for many employees. This is also true for those who are in their 30s and 40s, as they will be busy earning as much money as possible to boost retirement plans. Companies can set up an automatic retirement savings plan and match 50 cents on every dollar that employees contribute to help boost retirement savings.

    Training and Development

    The learning and professional development market has exploded since the evolution of online and remote classes. In addition, there are still many working adults who are reinventing themselves as a result of the recession which took away many jobs. Having a program that provides on-the-job training at no cost to employees can be a major boost to employee engagement and productivity. Make sure that there are many ways for employees to learn both on and off the job, such as support for college tuition, industry certifications and community events.

    Flexible Scheduling, Remote Work Arrangements

    There are millions of adults working from home at least a few days a week. Even those who work full time on business campuses are less likely to sit at desks all day because of the use of mobile technology. A workplace that creates mobile-friendly work options, such as telecommuting, holding meetings offsite and offering flexible work hours can be a great way to improve employee productivity and happiness.

    Mentorship and Advanced Skill Building

    A company that wants to inspire its workforce understands the need to transfer skills and knowledge from one generation to the next. Create a legacy learning and coaching program that matches seasoned leaders up with mid-level employees who will be ready to take that next step in their careers. Mentors can boost morale and they can also give the business an edge by deepening the core values that the company has developed. Set up mentorship meet-and-greet programs often.

    Wellness Benefits and Programs

    Employers are continually recognizing how critical the wellness and mind connection is for employees. When employees are healthy, they are happier and can work up to their full abilities. Wellness programs can be rolled out for a small investment and can include simple programs such as on-site nutritional support, walking programs and health fairs.

    Improved Working Environment

    Today’s employees are looking for the entire package when it comes to their work experience. They are no longer willing to work in stifling cubicle farms with no windows or anything pleasant to look at. Companies that take the time to improve the work environment with soft seating arrangements, collaborative workstations, pleasant artwork, lighting and live plants are going to find that this translates to happier employees. Making some changes in the workplace can help a company see an almost immediate boost in employee mood.

    Financial Wellness Benefits

    An overwhelming amount of debt stemming from credit cards, student loans, housing costs and more weigh on many employees. Many people just don’t know how to manage the money they earn. A company that invests in the financial education and well-being of its workforce can help employees to experience the freedom of getting out of debt and living within their means.

    Company Celebrations and Events

    Along with being connected to the profitability and success of a business, employees often look forward to celebrations. And why not celebrate their hard work and contributions? Have at least an annual celebration that includes all employees, including those that are family friendly. For example, there could be a week-long celebration with a fun theme, so employees can dress up for a costume contest, decorate their workspaces or participate in a chili cook-off.

    Employee Surveys and Brainstorming Sessions

    The greatest perk you can give your employees is the chance to have a voice. Employee engagement surveys, pulse surveys, and brainstorming sessions allow employees to speak up in an environment where they can feel safe and validated. Use a third party employee survey firm to handle the details and keep things confidential. Hold brief staff meetings with participants asking them to come up with workplace improvement ideas.

    Special Spotlight Projects and Community Causes

    Many employees enjoy the chance to gain professional and personal recognition for a project of their choosing. These can be community-based projects or initiatives that are industry related and promote the company in a positive light. Find out what causes employees are participating in and how the company can get behind them. Introduce the concept of employee social journalism into the day to day activities of the company to create culture and engagement.

    The above perks and benefits can be excellent incentives to get employees excited about their work again. Set up bonus and recognition programs to foster employee well-being even more. A little can go a long way, with the right effort from the company.

    Employer Engagement Services

    Build our brand and connect with us! We have many great opportunties for you to meet with top NYU talent for all your recruiting needs. Reach out to recruitment@nyu.edu to start hiring NYU talent today!

    Complimentary Services

    Job Postings

    Free online job and internship listing through Handshake, used by undergraduate and graduate students, as well as alumni.

    On-Campus Interviews for NYU Students

    Interview students in our state of the art space. Access our space which includes 23 interview rooms to conduct interviews on the New York University campus for full-time positions and paid summer internships during the academic year.

    Career Education & Networking Events

    We believe employers bring a valuable and unique perspective to students’ career exploration and development. Regardless of your current recruiting needs, we welcome your involvement in career development activities to stay connected to NYU students and build your brand on-campus. Some examples of past events are included below:

    • Boot Camps, Navigating Identities, Career Conversations, Women’s Networking Night

    Organization Site Visits

    Bring NYU student talent to your organization for an insider view. Visits range from 1-hour to a full-day experience and might include an office tour, alumni or employee panel, case activities, project/product demonstration, and position shadowing. Visits are tailored to meet your organization’s space and recruitment needs.

    Social Media Takeovers

    Share a day in the life at your organization. Build your organization’s brand, while cross-promoting open positions or promoting an upcoming event or information session using our @NYUWasserman handle to engage with students in a twitter take-over or Insta-Stories take-over to give students an insider view.

    Blog Posts

    Become a guest blogger! Create quick posts by providing inside information about your industry, your career or job search story, networking tips, or current NYU alum spotlight within your organization. We can work with you on a topic that works for you and your recruiting needs. Check out an example of a great employer blog.

    Signature Events

    Tabling Events

    Receive two tables for two hours in our Palladium Building Lobby which sees high foot traffic for the gym, residence hall, Wasserman Center, and Dining Hall. Discuss company culture, desired candidates, and enjoy networking the NYU talent in this casual atmosphere. $100

    Select Industry Meet-Ups

    Join 3-5 other organzations from your industry to speak with students and share more information about opportunities you have available and interact with top NYU talent. $150

    Coffee Chats

    Customizable informational chats with students are designed to offer students individual or small group meetings with a representative from your organization. Hosted in our office and scheduled either open coffee hours, or scheduled 15/30 minute appointments the sessions provide students with a brief overview of your organization and available job opportunities, as well as insight into careers in your industry. $200

    Information Sessions/Corporate Presentations

    60 minute employer information sessions give you the opportunity to share valuable company information with interested students in your own private space in our office on campus. Discuss company culture, desired candidates, and enjoy networking the NYU talent at the end of your presentation. $475-$575

    Broad Impact and Niche Career Fairs

    Career Fairs are unique and convenient opportunities to meet with a large number of motivated and interested students. Attending a career fair is an excellent way for organizations to gain visibility on-campus, build your brand, and maximize recruiting potential at NYU. $150-$750

    Select Diversity Programs

    Engage with top NYU students by sponsoring or attending one of the following programs targeted at underrepresented groups. Programs include:
    Diversity Internship Career & Prep Program (DICP), First Class Program (First Generation Student Mentorship Program), Women’s Herstory Month Series, Queer Connect Networking Night, Navigating Identities (Finance, Tech, Entertainment, Media, & Communications). $1000-$5000

    Career Center Takeover

    Takeover our Union Square state of the art office for a day to have your brand and opportunities in front of students in all forms of engagement. Recruit professionals from your organization to engage in activities that include: resume reviews, mock interviews, tabling, networking information sessions and more! Your logo and swag will be included throughout the office as well. $3500/half day. $5000/full day.

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