Premier announces a new Labour Market Strategy for Immigrati Канада


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Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)

Almost all Canadian work permits require a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), formerly called a Labor Market Opinion (LMO), in order hire a temporary foreign worker.

What is a Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)?

An LMIA is a labor market verification process whereby Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) assesses an offer of employment to ensure that the employment of a foreign worker will not have a negative impact on the Canadian labor market. Employers will be required to provide a variety of information about the position for which they want to hire a foreign worker, including the number of Canadians who applied for the position, the number of Canadians who were interviewed, and detailed explanations for why the Canadian workers considered were not hired.

In their analysis of the offer of employment, ESDC will consider the following elements:

Is the salary offered to the foreign worker consistent with the average for the occupation in the area the position is located?

Are the working conditions consistent with labor laws and/or collective bargaining agreements?

Is there a labor shortage for that occupation in the area the position is located?

Is there an ongoing labor dispute in the company and/or industry?

Has the Canadian employer undertaken recruitment efforts in order to find a Canadian to fill the position?

Will the foreign worker be able to transfer unique skills or expertise to Canadians?

Will hiring the foreign worker help to create or retain jobs for Canadians?

Will the foreign worker be the employee of the Canadian employer, whereby the foreign worker is expected to work on a full-time basis at a pre-determined wage?

Generally speaking, for jobs located in one of Canada’s major cities, the more specialized the position and the higher the salary offered, the higher the chances of obtaining a positive LMIA will be. In less populated cities and regions, this is still true but generally obtaining an LMIA may be easier.

LMIA Based Work Permits:

Typically, foreign workers and employers must go through a two-step process in order to receive a Canadian work permit. First, the applicant must submit an application to ESDC for a Labor Market Impact Assessment, followed by a second application to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for the actual work permit. The LMIA is issued by ESDC who, after considering numerous protective labour market factors, authorizes the Canadian employer to hire a foreign worker.

In June 2014, it was announced that work permits for foreign workers who require a LMIA will only be granted for a period of 1 year for all low-wage occupations.

How Long Does it take to Obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment?

ESDC has committed to a 10 business day service standard for certain LMIA applications. The 10 day processing will only be available for applications pertaining to jobs in high demand (such as skilled trades), jobs offering wages in the top 10% of wages earned by Canadians in that province or territory, and for jobs with a short duration work period (less than 120 days).

ESDC offices are responsible for processing LMIA applications, and there are ESDC offices exist in every Canadian province.

Requirements for Employers Applying for an LMIA:

Effective as of June 2014, all employers wishing to hire a temporary foreign worker to Canada must pay a processing fee of $1,000 CDN tied to each request for a labour market opinion. A “privilege fee” of $100 CDN is also required.

English and French must be the only languages that can be distinguished as job requirements both for LMIAs and for job vacancy advertisements unless the employer can prove that another language is otherwise required.

Employers must also advertise all job vacancies in the Canadian job market for at least four weeks before applying for an LMIA and are required to prove that they have used at least two other recruitment methods in addition to having posted an advertisement on the Canadian Job Bank website. Employers must focus advertising efforts on groups of Canadians who are under-represented, such as Aboriginals or persons with disabilities.

When employers are applying for LMIA for high-wage positions, they are also required to submit a transition plan to ESDC with their LMIA. The transition plan should indicate how the company plans to reduce their reliance on temporary foreign workers. Proof of investment in skills training or hiring Canadian apprentices are examples of how employers can prove they plan to reduce their reliance on temporary foreign workers. Proof that the employer is assisting their high-skilled temporary foreign worker in becoming a Canadian permanent resident can also qualify as the transition plan. If the employer is chosen for an inspection or if they apply to renew their LMIA, they will be required to report on the progress of their transition plan.

Employers are required to attest to their awareness that they are prohibited from laying off or cutting the hours of Canadian workers if they employ foreign workers.

Employers should be mindful of a number of criteria that affect whether or not ESDC will process an LMIA application. Currently, if an employer’s LMIA application meets all of the following criteria, it will not be processed:

The occupation listed on the LMIA is as defined as a job in Accommodations, Food Service or Retail Sales. Under the North American Industry Classification System (NAIC), these occupations are classified as NAIC type 72, 44, or 45.

The occupation listed is categorized as Skill Level D in the National Occupation Classification.

The economic region where the job is to take place has an annual unemployment rate of over 6%.

Employers hiring for certain occupations, such as airlines requesting foreign pilots, may face additional requirements. Contact FWCanada for details.

For more information about the LMIA process or for assistance bringing a foreign worker to Canada, fill out our assessment form.

FWCanada is a Montreal-based immigration law firm that provides professional legal services on Canadian immigration. For more tips and updates on Canadian immigration follow FWCanada on Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin.

Nova Scotia Labour Market Priorities

The Nova Scotia Labour Market Priorities stream selects candidates in the federal Express Entry system who meet provincial labour market needs to apply for nomination. Only candidates who receive a Letter of Interest from the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration may apply.

ELIGIBILITY

To apply you must:

  • receive a Letter of Interest from the Nova Scotia Nominee Program within the Express Entry system;
  • submit your application within 30 calendar days of the date on which your letter of interest was issued;
  • meet the minimum work experience requirements of the Express Entry stream for which you have qualified;
  • demonstrate sufficient funds to successfully establish yourself and your family in Nova Scotia and to pay your immigration costs and travel expenses;
  • have legal status in your current country of res >

Criteria for the Oct. 28, 2020, draw for nurses are as follows. Candidates must:

  • Have a primary occupation of registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse (NOC 3012)
  • Provide letters of reference from employers, as outlined in the application guide, to demonstrate that they have 3 or more years of experience as a registered nurse or registered psychiatric nurse.
  • Have a Canadian Language Benchmark score of 8 or higher in English or French in all language abilities as demonstrated by providing results from a language test approved by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.*
  • Hold a bachelor’s degree OR have completed a program of three or more years at a university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute.*
  • Have submitted an expression of interest to the Express Entry pool on or after Nov. 1, 2020

* You must include copies of language tests and proof of education to meet a bachelor’s degree or higher with your application. Proof of education must include an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report issued by an organization designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada if your educational credential was obtained outside of Canada.


International Credential Recognition

Visit the Nova Scotia College of Nursing site to learn about becoming licensed in Nova Scotia.

The Department of Health and Wellness’s Entry to Practice Policy for Continuing Care Assistants allows certain internationally educated nurses assessed by the National Nursing Assessment Service to work as Continuing Care Assistants.

HOW TO APPLY

If you have received a Letter of Interest, complete the online application form and include all required information and attachments.

APPLICATION GUIDE AND FORMS

CONTACT INFORMATION

Nova Scotia Office of Immigration
1469 Brenton Street, 3rd floor
PO Box 1535
Halifax, NS, Canada
B3J 2Y3

Nova Scotia Start

Nova Scotia Start offers information and support for new immigrants.

Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) для трудоустройства в Канаде

В некоторых случаях чтобы трудоустроить иностранных граждан в Канаде, работодатель должен сделать Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA).

Для трудоустройства иностранных граждан работодатель должен получить оценку воздействия на рынок труда Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). LMIA — это документ, который выдается отделом занятости и социального развития Канады (Employment and Social Development Canada), и который дает работодателю разрешение нанять временного иностранного работника.

В LMIA нужно доказать, что на данную вакансию нет доступных сотрудников из числа канадских граждан и только иностранец может занять вакансию. Позитивную LMIA иногда называют подтверждающим письмом (confirmation letter).

Оформление оценки полностью возложено на работодателя. Перед трудоустройством иностранца работодатель должен проверить требуется ли ему LMIA, и если требуется, он должен подать на нее заявку.

Иностранный работник также самостоятельно может проверить потребуется ли LMIA для его трудоустройства. Для это нужно ответить на несколько вопросов, чтобы узнать:

  • вид разрешения на работу, на который иностранный работник сможет подать заявку, и
  • шаги, которые должен предпринять работодатель, прежде чем иностранный работник подаст заявку на получение разрешения на работу

Вы уже подписались на мой Telegram-канал про жизнь в Канаде?

Работодатели, которые трудоустраивают временных работников некоторых типов, должны получить оценку воздействия на рынок труда (LMIA) до того, как работник подаст заявку на разрешение на работу. Как только работодатель получает LMIA, работник может подать заявку на получение разрешения на работу.

Чтобы подать заявку на разрешение на работу, работнику необходимо:

Существует также программа облегченного трудоустройства иностранцев по LMIA в Квебеке (Facilitated Labour Market Impact Assessment process for Quebec employers). По этой программе работодатель Квебека, нанимающий иностранного сотрудника на позицию, охваченную списком профессий, освобождается от необходимости сначала рекламировать позицию на месте, чтобы привлечь на нее канадцев.

Когда LMIA не нужна

Если вы иммигрируете через Express Entry, то работодателю не нужно получать LMIA, если вы:

  • работали на полный рабочий день у этого же работодателя по разрешению на работу не менее 1 года (или равное время на неполную занятость) и
  • имеете предложение о работеи
  • имеете действительное разрешение на работу, которое освобождается от LMIA в соответствии с
    • международным соглашением или
    • федерально-провинциальным соглашением или
    • по категории «канадские интересы»

Если вы иммигрируете по программе Federal Skilled Trades Program, до двух работодателей могут сделать предложение о работе. Вы должны работать на двоих работодателей.

Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) Exemptions

In order to bring a temporary foreign worker to Canada, a Canadian employer must generally receive a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA). There are several cases, however, where the need for a LMIA may be waived.

Some of the most common LMIA-exempt streams are outlined below. This page is divided into the following sections:

Note: Being exempt from obtaining a LMIA does not mean the individual is exempt from obtaining a work permit. All streams on the LMIA exemption list still require the individual to obtain a work permit to work in Canada legally.

Canada Work Permit HR Tool

The Canada Work Permit HR Tool has been designed to help employers navigate the complex process of hiring foreign workers.

Significant benefit

Apart from the situations outlined below in this section, Canadian visa officers have a degree of flexibility in assessing whether the issuance of a work permit to a foreign national is desirable without the need for a LMIA to be secured. This is known as significant social or cultural benefit.

The foreign national’s proposed benefit to Canada through his or her work must be significant, meaning it must be important or notable. Officers typically rely on the testimony of credible, trustworthy, and distinguished experts in the foreign national’s field, as well as any objective evidence provided. The foreign national’s past record is a good indicator of his or her level of achievement.

Objective measures for “significant social or cultural benefit”:

  • an official academic record showing that the foreign national has a degree, diploma, certificate, or similar award from a college, university, school, or other institution of learning relating to the area of their ability;
  • evidence from current or former employers showing that the foreign national has significant full time experience in the occupation for which he or she is sought (significant in this context can be taken to mean ten or more years experience);
  • has been the recipient of national or international awards or patent;
  • evidence of membership in organizations requiring excellence of its members;
  • having been the judge of the work of others;
  • evidence of recognition for achievements and significant contributions to the field by peers, governmental organizations, or professional or business associations;
  • evidence of scientific or scholarly contributions to the field by the foreign national;
  • publications authored by the foreign national in academic or industry publications; and.or
  • leading role of the foreign national in an organization with a distinguished reputation.

Entrepreneurs/Self-Employed Persons

A LMIA exemption may be granted to private entrepreneurs who wish to come to Canada temporarily in order to start or operate a business. Applicants to one of these programs must be the sole or majority owners of the business they wish to pursue in Canada. They will also have to demonstrate that their business will be of significant benefit to Canada. Entrepreneurs are only eligible for LMIA-exempt work permits if they can demonstrate that their work in Canada is temporary in nature. This category is particularly well suited to owners of seasonal businesses. Entrepreneurs who have already applied for Canadian permanent residence may also qualify for LMIA-exempt work permits in this category. Entrepreneurs are only eligible for LMIA-exempt work permits if they can demonstrate that their work in Canada is temporary in nature.

Intra-Company Transferees

Intra-Company Transferees may be granted a LMIA exemption for a temporary transfer to Canada. Transferees must be considered executives, managers, or specialized knowledge workers, and must work for a foreign company with a qualifying relationship to the company in Canada.

Dependents Of Foreign Workers


Spouses and children of Foreign Workers holding a Canadian work permit for a skilled position do not require a LMIA. Please note that this does not apply to the spouses of workers on an International Exchange Program.

French-Speaking Skilled Workers

Foreign nationals who have been recruited through a francophone immigration promotional event coordinated between the federal government and Francophone minority communities, and who are destined for a province or territory outside of Quebec and qualified under a National Occupational Classification (NOC) 0, A or B, may be eligible to work in Canada through Mobilité Francophone.

Academics

This includes researchers, guest lecturers, and visiting professors.

Provincial LMIA Exemptions

Workers nominated by a province for permanent residence and who have obtained a job offer in that province may be exempt from the need for a LMIA.

Reciprocal employment

Reciprocal employment agreements allow foreign workers to take up employment in Canada when Canadians have similar reciprocal work opportunities abroad.

International Agreements

Canada is a party to a number of international agreements that facilitate the entry of foreign workers. Admission of foreign workers under these agreements is considered of significant benefit to Canada and, as such, does not require a LMIA. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is an example of this case.

International Exchange Programs

Canada is a participant in a number of programs for international youth exchange. Such programs include the International Experience Canada (IEC) Working Holiday Visa, Student Co-op programs, Young Professionals programs, and teacher exchange programs. These programs are exempt from the need for a LMIA.

Charitable and religious work

Charitable workers

In the Canadian context, charity is defined as the relief of poverty, advancement of education or certain other purposes that benefit the community. As such, certain charitable workers do not require a LMIA in order to enter the Canadian labour market temporarily.

Being registered with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) as a chairty is a strong indicator that an organization is indeed charitable in nature. However, foreign workers may be able to work in Canada for an organization under this LMIA-exempt provision that is not registered with the CRA; the visa officer may request additional information from the employer in such an instance.

The government of Canada draws a distinction between a charitable worker, who needs a work permit, and a volunteer worker, who is work-permit exempt. A volunteer worker does not enter the labour market and his or her presence in Canada is incidental to the main purpose of the visit A charitable worker, on the other hand, usually takes a position involving an activity that meets the definition of work and may be compensated for his or her work in Canada. As a result, he or she needs a work permit, though the LMIA process is not required.

Religous Workers

Religious work normally entails a requirement for the foreign national to be part of, or share, the beliefs of the particular religious community where he or she intends to work, or to have the ability to teach or share other religious beliefs, as required by the employer.

For this LMIA-exempt category, the primary duties of the foreign national should reflect a particular religious objective, for example the provision of religious instruction or promotion of a particular religion or faith.

The work should involve advancing the spiritual teachings of a religious faith, as well as maintaining the doctrines and spiritual observances on which those teachings are based.

Contact us

Please complete this short form to submit your work permit query directly to our specialists.

The Canada Jobs Report: Fall 2020

Over 54,000 jobs created in Canada in September as employment increased by 110,000 in the third quarter.

Author

November 13th, 2020

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It’s October, the sun is shining, the leaves have turned a beautiful shade of Autumnal gold and we’re less than a week out from the Canadian federal election. If that wasn’t enough, the the Quarterly Canada Jobs Report from Moving2Canada is here to paint a detailed picture of how the economy has been performing over the past three months.

Employment rose by 54,000 in September, which resulted in the unemployment rate declining by 0.2 percentage points to 5.5 percent. In the past three months, employment increased by 111,000, or 0.6 percent. On a year-over-year basis, employment grew by 456,000, or 2.4 percent. Over the same period, total hours worked were up 1.3 percent.

Canada job market: Fall 2020

Canada Job Market Fall 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Quarterly Canada Jobs Report.

The data below comes from the Labour Force Survey, produced by Statistics Canada.

The Provincial Picture

What industries are attracting immigrants to Canada?

The latest jobs figures in Canada are healthy. Very healthy, in fact. Speaking on the continued jobs growth in Canada in the third quarter, Josh Nye, senior economist at Royal Bank of Canada, had this to say:

“There was no give-back after August’s strong jobs numbers as Canada recorded another above-50,000 employment gain in September (the fifth such increase in nine months this year). The labour force is growing at its fastest pace in more than a decade, helping sustain job growth late in the economic cycle.”

But what has this got to with immigrants? Well, quite a lot actually.

Newcomers arrive to Canada for a whole host of reasons but job openings and new career opportunities are two of the most important factors. We also know that immigrants continue to contribute to Canada’s economy with unemployment levels either below or slightly above the figure for all Canadians depending on the origin continent of the immigrants in question. With that in mind, we have decided to share this visual representation of the top five industries being pursued by Express Entry candidates to Canada. We hope that this information will help you understand the Canadian jobs market, and the role of immigrants in it, more closely.

If you want to see how the figures in this quarter’s Jobs Report compare with previous ones, then feel free to view our helpful slides below.


Moving2Canada Quarterly Jobs Report: Summer 2020

Canada’s monthly unemployment rate increased from 5.4 to 5.5 percent in June, and while it is never positive to see this total creeping upwards, the reality is that the employment landscape in Canada remains extremely buoyant in the first half of 2020. In fact, the 5.5 percent unemployment total is a sizable drop from the already lean 5.8 percent figure from January.

In the last six months, the Canadian economy has added 247,500 jobs – the majority of them are full time positions – meaning that this is the single biggest employment growth spurt since 2002.

In addition, wage growth has increased by more than 2 percentage points since January as employers continue to compete for the best candidates. From a provincial perspective, almost all provinces (Manitoba and Newfoundland and Labrador) have seen unemployment rate reductions since the start of the year.

Finally, immigrants continue to prosper in Canada in 2020 as the economy reaches record-level growth. Find out what employers are saying about the role they play ahead of this October’s federal election below.

Canada job market: 2020’s first six months

Canada Job Market Summer 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

The data below comes from the Labour Force Survey, produced by Statistics Canada.

The Provincial Picture

October election is business time for immigrants to Canada

With just over three months to go until Canadians go to the polls to elect a new federal government, it should come as little surprise that the issue of immigration is to the fore.

The number of immigrants moving and settling in Canada has increased steadily under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s premiership – with 321,035 new permanent residents in Canada in 2020 – and a political debate has emerged about what immigration route Canada should pursue in the next four years. However, among the business community, there appears to be a clear consensus on this issue.

With the Canadian unemployment rate currently at 5.5 percent, it is widely predicted that immigrants will be needed to grow the economy in the months and years to come. A June 25 report showed the country’s farm labour shortage is costing billions and is expected to balloon in the next decade.

Speaking on the vital role that immigrants have played in growing the Canadian economy, Goldy Hyder, head of the Business Council of Canada, had this to say:

“We don’t want immigration to be used as a political weapon here as it has been in the United States.We agree with the federal government’s targets and we need to meet those targets. The facts clearly demonstrate that Canada is going to need immigrants to help grow the economy.”

This sentiment was echoed by Rocco Rossi, head of Ontario’s Chamber of Commerce who stated that:

“We could do with even more (immigrants), we have enormous needs.”

It remains to be seen what will happen in October’s federal election but it’s not an exaggeration to suggest that the country’s continued economic growth is intrinsically tied to the number of immigrants entering Canada each year. We will continue to monitor this situation closely and keep you informed of all updates.

If you want to see how the figures in this month’s Jobs Report compare with previous months, then feel free to view our helpful slides below.

Moving2Canada Jobs Report: June 2020

There was further good news for the Canadian economy in May as the unemployment rate fell by 0.3 percentage points to 5.4 percent. The unemployment rate in May was the lowest since comparable data became available in 1976.

The report released from Statistics Canada indicates that compared with May 2020, employment grew by 453,000, or 2.4 percent, reflecting gains in both full-time (+299,000) and part-time (+154,000) work. Over the same period, total hours worked were up 1.0 percent.

Canada job market: latest unemployment figures

Unemployment in Canada fell to 5.4 percent in May 2020.

One of the biggest takeaways from the Moving2Canada Jobs Report for June is the growth in the health care sector. There were 20,000 more people working in health care and social assistance in May, bringing year-over-year gains in this industry to 89,000 (+3.7 percent). Over half of this increase was in Ontario.

Similarly, the professional, scientific and technical services sector saw an increase of 17,000 last month, more than offsetting a decline in the previous month. The rise in May was again primarily concentrated in Ontario, while smaller increases were also registered in New Brunswick and Saskatchewan. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in this industry grew by 67,000 or 4.5 percent.

Finally, a closer look at immigrant unemployment trends in Canada for May shows that immigrants from Latin America, Asia, Europe and North America all saw their month-on-month unemployment rate fall. Meanwhile, the employment rate for all landed immigrants declined or remained static last month. In addition, a recent internal federal memo indicates that the employment rate for immigrants aged 25 to 54 who landed less than five years ago was 71 per cent in 2020. It was the indicator’s highest level since 2006 — which is as far back as the data goes.

Canada Job Market June 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

The data below comes from the Labour Force Survey, produced by Statistics Canada.

Prime Minister Trudeau acknowledges positive role of immigrants in Canada’s growing tech sector

At Moving2Canada we are acutely aware of the positive impact that immigrants play in the Canadian jobs market. By both bolstering and growing the Canadian economy and adding diversity to the social make-up of the country, recent, and not so recent, newcomers to the country have helped Canada grow and prosper while other countries’ economies stagnate. However, it is not just us who feel this way, it is also a sentiment shared by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Speaking at the the Collision tech conference last month, Prime Minister Trudeau had this to say:

“Access to talent obviously comes from immigration and it comes from training young and educating Canadians right.”

He added that while many countries like the US and UK are closing themselves off more to immigration, Canada is staying open. Making a point to reference the importance of immigrants in the Canadian jobs market, Trudeau said:

“As we see anxieties and worries around the world, Canadians know that we get more resilient communities, we get better solutions, we get better innovations, when we bring in people from all around the world. That’s why we are doing well even at a time of anxiety — we have seen the Canadian economy flourish over the past few years.”

Hear, hear, Justin, we couldn’t have said it better ourselves!

Notice: Immigrant unemployment rates are not available in seasonally adjusted statistics.

Monthly employment gains in May

In last month’s Canadian Jobs Report we informed you that there was an increase in the annual jobs figure, as employment grew by 426,000 (+2.3 percent). The good news is that the positive story that emerged in April was backed up strongly in May as the number of people working in the labour market increased by over 27,000 month-on-month for a new total of 19,056,800. Similarly, and as we discussed earlier, the unemployment rate fell by 0.3 percentage points for a new total of 5.4 percent — the lowest rate since 1976.

Total Population May 2020 Apr 2020 May 2020 Change M-O-M Change Y-O-Y
Labour force (x 1,000) 19,761.40 20,187.80 20,138.60 -49.2 377.2
Employment (x 1,000) 18,603.70 19,029.10 19,056.80 27.7 453.1
Full-time employment (x 1,000) 15,147.00 15,418.30 15,446.00 27.7 299.0
Part-time employment (x 1,000) 3,456.70 3,610.80 3,610.80 +154.1
Unemployment rate (percentage) 5.9 5.7 5.4 -0.3 -0.5

BC awakes from its employment slumber

From a provincial perspective, four provinces recorded upturns in employment numbers in May. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick saw modest gains of 4,500 and 3,000 jobs in their respective labour markets, but in Ontario and British Columbia more sizable jobs market increases were detected.

Employment in Ontario rose by 21,000 in May, with notable increases among the core-aged population and among women. Similarly, year-on-year employment was up by 222,000, or 3.1 percent. However, perhaps the bigger story is in BC where, following little change in the previous five months, employment rose by 17,000 in May. Compared with May 2020, employment in the province grew by 107,000 (+4.3%).

Elsewhere, Alberta and Quebec remained relatively unchanged in terms of month-to-month employment variations, but the story was less positive on the east coast where employment in Newfoundland and Labrador was down 2,700, driven by losses in part-time work.


Industry in focus: Clean energy

With more and more attention being played to the impact of global warming and climate change in recent times, it should come as no surprise that this month we are shining a light on the clean energy sector. One point that may come as a surprise however is just how developed this sector is in Canada right now, and it looks to be growing from strength to strength as Canada’s labour market grows and diversifies.

Canada’s clean energy sector employed 298,000 Canadians as of 2020. What’s more, it’s growing in value by 4.8 percent every year — a third faster than Canada’s economy as a whole. Pretty impressive numbers, I hear you say, but which jobs are covered under the umbrella term of clean energy?

In general, the clean energy sector includes companies and jobs in the Canadian economy that help cut carbon pollution, whether by creating clean energy, moving it or shaping how it’s used for heat, power and transportation. This diverse sector has created jobs across every province, and is an increasingly important part of employment in the Canadian labour market..

If you want some quick and concise takeaways of the value of the clean energy sectorto Canada’s economic and environmental sustainability, then these five should come in handy:

  1. The value of the clean energy sector grew by 4.8% a year between 2010 and 2020. Compare that to the whole of Canada’s economy, which grew by 3.6% annually over that same period.
  2. The number of jobs grew by 2.2% a year between 2010 and 2020 — nearly 60% faster than Canada’s economy as a whole.
  3. Investment in the clean energy sector went up by 70% between 2010 and 2020, mirroring well-above-average rises in its GDP.
  4. Clean transport was the biggest employer, providing 57% of the jobs in 2020.
  5. Renewable energy supply is one of the biggest earners, providing 40% of the sector’s GDP contribution.

That’s it for this month, but if you would like to join the team at Moving2Canada, then you’re in luck as we’re hiring! Visit our Careers Page for more information.

If you want to see how the figures in this month’s Jobs Report compare with previous months, then feel free to view our helpful slides below.

Moving2Canada Jobs Report: May 2020

There was more good news for workers and businesses in Canada this month as the labour market saw its biggest month-on-month increase since 1976. This is also good news for people who want to move to Canada, as a roaring economy means greater opportunity.

The report released from Statistics Canada indicates that Canada added 106,500 net jobs in April, the bulk of which were full-time positions. This significant increase in the number of jobs in Canada saw the unemployment rate fall to 5.7 percent in April, down 0.1 percentage points from March.

One of the biggest takeaways from the Moving2Canada Jobs Report for May is the growth in construction jobs.

Following four months of little change, employment in construction increased by 29,000 in April. Gains were concentrated in Ontario and British Columbia. On a year-over-year basis, employment in Canada’s construction industry was up by 32,000 (+2.2 percent, and experienced international construction professionals are invited to visit our Outpost recruitment agency website).

Similarly, employment was up by 32,000 in wholesale and retail trade in April, driven by increases in Quebec and Alberta. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment in this industry grew by 75,000 (+2.7 percent), entirely due to gains since the beginning of 2020.

Finally, employment increased by 24,000 in April for women in the core working ages of 25 to 54. The unemployment rate for this age group was 4.8 percent for women. On a year-over-year basis, employment increased by 103,000 (+1.8 percent) among core-aged women.

Finally, a closer look at immigrant unemployment trends in Canada for April shows that immigrants from Latin America, Asia, Europe and Africa saw their month-on-month unemployment rate either fall or remain the same in April, with only the North American cohort experiencing an increase in the number of people unemployed.

Canada Job Market May 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

The data below comes from the Labour Force Survey, produced by Statistics Canada.

Recent report shows that immigrant businesses created a ‘disproportionate’ number of Canadian jobs

A recent study from Statistics Canada has found that between 2003 and 2013, immigrant-owned businesses had a “disproportionate share of net job creation” compared with their Canadian-born counterparts.

The study also indicated that private businesses owned and operated by immigrants accounted for 25 per cent of net jobs created by private incorporated firms during the 11-year period. This amounted to roughly 400,000 net new jobs created between 2003 and 2013 and translated to a higher per-firm net job creation average than Canadian-owned businesses.

There is little doubt that immigration looks set to be one of the most pivotal political issues in this year’s federal election. Given this backdrop, it was refreshing to see the results of a recently published poll by the Environics Institute for Survey Research which indicates that Canadians’ views on immigrants have remained constant in recent months, despite disparaging rhetoric from some corners of the political establishment.

When polled alongside party preference, the results were illuminating and may act as a barometer for debates on the issue later in the year. The findings indicated that 75 percent of Liberal supporters and 70 percent of NDP respondents said they disagree with the notion that immigration levels are too high, compared with 44 percent of Conservatives.

Notice: Immigrant unemployment rates are not available in seasonally adjusted statistics.

Year-on year unemployment reductions

In last month’s Jobs Report we informed you that there was an increase in the annual unemployment figures, with a net decline of 7,200 jobs nationwide. Well, we’re now pleased to report that this annual trend was reversed in April as employment grew by 426,000 (+2.3 percent). Gains were made in both full-time (+248,000) and part-time (+179,000) work compared with April 2020. In addition, total hours worked were up 1.3 percent in the same period.

Total Population May 2020 Apr 2020 May 2020 Change M-O-M Change Y-O-Y
Labour force (x 1,000) 19,761.40 20,187.80 20,138.60 -49.2 377.2
Employment (x 1,000) 18,603.70 19,029.10 19,056.80 27.7 453.1
Full-time employment (x 1,000) 15,147.00 15,418.30 15,446.00 27.7 299.0
Part-time employment (x 1,000) 3,456.70 3,610.80 3,610.80 +154.1
Unemployment rate (percentage) 5.9 5.7 5.4 -0.3 -0.5

Unemployment falls below 5 percent in Quebec

From a provincial perspective, Quebec was the big winner in terms of unemployment reduction in April with the province reporting a new rate of 4.9 percent. This new unemployment figure represents a reduction of 0.3 percentage points month-on-month, and a yearly fall of 0.5 percentage points.

It was a similarly positive story in Prince Edward Island, where unemployment fell by 0.3 and 2.2 percentage points, respectively, in terms of monthly and yearly comparisons for a new total of 8.6 percent.

Yearly reductions were also evident in Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and British Colombia. The one black mark on Canada’s unemployment copybook for April was in Ontario, where unemployment has hit the 6 percent mark.

Industry in focus: Electricity providers

A recent report from the Electricity Human Resources Canada suggests that the industry is going to have to appeal to a younger and more diverse cohort of people if it wants to ensure that the lights stay on in homes and businesses across Canada. The report indicated that at least 20,500 new workers will be needed in power plants and transmission systems before 2022 if the needs of Canada’s expanding population are to be met.

Most of the new workers will be needed to replace the aging workforce, but the industry is also expanding as demand for power grows thanks to battery-powered electronics, electric cars, and digital systems.

Unlike other industries, the electrical industry is not as diverse as Canada as a whole, with women accounting for only one in four employees and visible minorities just over one in 10. Moreover, of the almost 107,000 people employed directly in the industry in Canada, fewer than one in 20 people employed in the sector are under the age of 25, meaning it is a far older industry than the Canadian average.

The challenge of finding new and skilled workers in the electricity provider industry are complicated further by the more demanding training that is tied to positions in this sector. Speaking on the issue, Electricity Human Resources Canada CEO Michelle Branigan had this to say:

“These people are not trained in like three months or six months and ready to hit the ground running.”

There is no doubt that the shortfall of new workers in the electricity industry in Canada is problematic, and challenges exist to diversify and grow the workforce. That said, there may be a light at the end of the tunnel. Given the success that recent and longer-landed immigrants have had in Canada in recent years, it feels like a win-win for all involved.

Finally, if you would like to join the team at Moving2Canada, then you’re in luck as we’re hiring! Visit our Careers Page for more information.

If you want to see how the figures in this month’s Jobs Report compare with previous months, then feel free to view our helpful slides below.

Moving2Canada Jobs Report: April 2020

After the best two-month start to a year since 1981 for job creation in Canada, March’s figures show a net decline of 7,200 jobs in Canada. Still, this was the best quarter of job creation since late 2020, and Canada’s job market remains strong.

Unemployment went down in eight of Canada’s ten provinces last month; only population-rich Ontario and British Columbia showed slight increases, resulting in no month-on-month change to the national unemployment rate, which remains at 5.8 percent as we enter the spring season.

Canada job market: latest unemployment figures


For this April Moving2Canada Jobs Report, we’re going to focus on a couple of key stats hidden in the latest StatsCan Labour Force Survey:

  • Wage gains were up 2.4 percent year-on-year, outpacing the inflation rate (1.5 percent in February).
  • Hours worked has increased by nearly 1 percent, showing a trend towards more full-time work.

So, which industries are leading when it comes to wage growth? StatsCan provides some key answers.

Employee average hourly wages by industry

Mar-18 Mar-19 $ annual change % annual change
Total employees, all industries 26.97 27.61 $0.64 2.37%
Goods-producing sector 28.89 29.99 $1.10 3.81%
Agriculture 19.19 19.92 $0.73 3.80%
Forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas 40.33 40.28 -$0.05 -0.12%
Utilities 41.23 41.29 $0.06 0.15%
Construction 29.31 30.55 $1.24 4.23%
Manufacturing 26.1 27.46 $1.36 5.21%
Services-producing sector 26.49 27.02 $0.53 2.00%
Wholesale and retail trade 20.79 21.15 $0.36 1.73%
Transportation and warehousing 26.85 27.1 $0.25 0.93%
Finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing 31.56 31.48 -$0.08 -0.25%
Professional, scientific and technical services 33.58 35.07 $1.49 4.44%
Business, building and other support services 20.49 21.22 $0.73 3.56%
Educational services 32.73 33.62 $0.89 2.72%
Health care and social assistance 27.47 27.57 $0.1 0.36%
Information, culture and recreation 25.49 25.55 $0.06 0.24%
Accommodation and food services 15.64 16.37 $0.73 4.67%
Other services (except public administration) 23.08 23.48 $0.40 1.73%
Public administration 36.99 37.18 $0.19 0.51%

Canada Job Market April 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

The data below comes from the Labour Force Survey, produced by Statistics Canada.

Highest immigrant numbers in a century contribute to Canada’s lowest unemployment rate for decades

According to a recent Statistics Canada report, over 321,000 people moved to Canada in 2020. This figure means that more immigrants arrived in Canada in 2020 compared with any other year since 1913, when 401,000 newcomers landed in Canada. This influx of individuals and families to Canada saw the nation’s population growth top half a million people for the first time since the late 1950’s.

In percentage terms, Canada’s population increased by 1.4 percent in 2020, the fastest increase since 1990 and the strongest among Group of Seven countries. And while it would be ill-informed to attribute Canada’s recent record low unemployment levels exclusively to newcomers to Canada, immigrants continue to play a vital role in the growth and development of the Canadian economy.

A closer look at immigrant employment trends in Canada for March shows that immigrants who landed in Canada more than five years ago, but last than a decade ago, saw month-on-month decreases of 0.2 percentage points in March for a new total of 6.6 percent. This total is less than one percentage point higher than the total unemployment figure for all Canadians.

Finally, from a continent-specific point of view, only North American immigrants saw a month-on-month reduction in their unemployment figure for a new total of 4.4 percent.

Notice: Immigrant unemployment rates are not available in seasonally adjusted statistics.

Click to view table: Unemployment among immigrants

Year-on year employment growth

In last month’s Jobs Report we informed you that overall employment increased by 369,000, or 2 percent compared with February 2020. Unfortunately, the downward trajectory in the unemployment total was checked somewhat in March with a net decline of 7,200 jobs. That said, in the first quarter of 2020, employment rose by 116,000 (+0.6%). Similarly, year-on-year, employment grew by 332,000 (+1.8%).

Total Population Apr 2020 Mar 2020 Apr 2020 Change M-O-M Change Y-O-Y
Labour force (x 1,000) 19,765.40 20,079.70 20,187.80 108.1 422.4
Employment (x 1,000) 18,602.70 18,922.60 19,029.10 106.5 426.4
Full-time employment (x 1,000) 15,170.40 15,345.30 15,418.30 73.0 247.9
Part-time employment (x 1,000) 3,432.30 3,577.20 3,610.80 33.6 178.5
Unemployment rate (percentage) 5.9 5.8 5.7 -0.1 -0.2

Employment up Atlantic Canada and Prairie provinces.

Employment increased by 3,900 in Saskatchewan in March and the unemployment rate declined by 0.9 percentage points to for a new total of 4.9 percent—the lowest rate since August 2015.

It was a similarly positive story in New Brunswick, where employment rose by 3,100, while the unemployment rate decreased by 0.6 percentage points to 7.9 percent.

In Prince Edward Island, an additional 2,000 people were employed in March as the unemployment rate fell by 1.4 percentage points to 8.9 percent. One of the biggest challenges facing Canada’s smallest province has been the retention of immigrant workers. For optimal results to this question it has been suggested that the private sector needs to take a more hands-on approach to keep newcomers in PEI. Recognizing the growing labour supply issue, Cavendish Farms, a JD Irving Limited company, has appointed a director of immigration for this very purpose. We will continue to monitor this development closely in the coming months and see if other businesses follow suit.

Click to view table: Unemployment rate by province

Industry in focus: Agriculture

Based on Statistics Canada detailed reporting, agriculture has seen the strongest year-on-year growth, with 3,500 jobs created through March 2020. As we touched on earlier, the industry also saw the hourly rate of pay in the sector increase by $0.73 cents or 3.8 percentage points on the same time last year. Much of this growth has been based in the Prairie provinces including Saskatchewan. In fact, the “Breadbasket of Canada” now has the second lowest unemployment rate in the country, behind British Columbia’s 4.7 percent.

Finally, if you would like to join the team at Moving2Canada, then you’re in luck as we’re hiring! Visit our Careers Page for more information.

If you want to see how the figures in this month’s Jobs Report compare with previous months, then feel free to view our helpful slides below.

Moving2Canada Jobs Report: February 2020

The juggernaut that is the Canadian economy continues to defy expectations, with unemployment remaining below six percent and 55,900 net new jobs added across the country through February. This gain was far greater than expected by economists.

The number of new full-time positions was actually greater than the overall net figure, with around 67,400 more full-time positions offset by a decline of 11,600 part-time roles. Some of these changes may be explained, at least in part, by more workers moving from part-time employment to full-time roles — and that means more workers with more stable incomes and higher wages.

Canada job market: latest unemployment figures

The Canadian unemployment rate remained consistent at 5.8% in February.

As has been the case over recent months, immigrants to Canada are at the heart of this continuing success story.

Canada Job Market February 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

Yearly unemployment rate drops for Latin American, African and Asian immigrant groups

Despite the ongoing political controversy whirling around Ottawa at present, the reality is that immigration is likely to be one of the most important issues in this year’s federal election campaign. The Liberal and Conservative party leaders may not be diametrically opposed on the issue of immigration but there is no doubt that Conservative Party leader, Andrew Scheer does not agree with all aspects of Prime Minister Trudeau’s pro-immigration policies. While it may be difficult to predict the future in this respect, one thing that is for certain is that immigrants are continuing to contribute positively to the Canadian economy.

A closer look at immigrant employment trends in Canada for February shows that immigrants who landed in Canada in the last decade saw month-on-month decreases of 0.2 percentage points in February for a new total of 6.8 percent – just one percentage point higher than the total unemployment figure for all Canadians.

Finally from a continent-specific point of view, only European immigrants saw a month-on-month reduction. However, there was year-on-year unemployment reductions for the African, Asian and Latin American cohorts in Canada, while unemployment level among Europeans (4.7 percent) is the same as it was a year ago in February 2020.

Notice: Immigrant unemployment rates are not available in seasonally adjusted statistics.

Year-on year employment growth increased further in February

In last month’s Jobs Report we informed you that overall employment increased by 327,000, or 1.8 percent compared with January 2020. Well, we have more good news in February as the year-on-year increase on February 2020 is 369,100. This equates to an increase of 2 percent.

Finally, from a demographic perspective, youth employment had an important role to play in this month’s positive employment story. The number of young people employed (aged between 15 to 24) in Canada increased for the second consecutive month, jumping by 29,000 in February. The increase was split pretty evenly between young women (+16,000) and young men (+13,000). The unemployment rate for youth was little changed, at 10.8 percent.

Total Population Mar 2020 Feb 2020 Mar 2020 Change M-O-M Change Y-O-Y
Labour force (x 1,000) 19,740.30 20,091.00 20,079.70 -11.3 339.4
Employment (x 1,000) 18,591.00 18,929.80 18,922.60 -7.2 331.6
Full-time employment (x 1,000) 15,141.60 15,351.70 15,345.30 -6.4 203.7
Part-time employment (x 1,000) 3,449.40 3,578.10 3,577.20 -0.9 127.8
Unemployment rate (percentage) 5.8 5.8 5.8

Positive and negatives for Canadian provinces in February

The second month of the year saw the unemployment rate across Canada remain constant at 5.8 percent.


A deeper dive into the figures illustrates that Ontario and Quebec both saw employment gains. Employment in Ontario rose for the second consecutive month, up 37,000 in February, boosted by gains in full-time work (+59,000). However, the unemployment rate was unchanged at 5.7 percent as more people participated in the Ontario labour market.

Similarly, in Quebec, employment edged up slightly in February, continuing the upward trend from Fall 2020. The unemployment rate was little changed at 5.3 percent.

In the prairies, the story is a little less positive as employment fell by 3,300 in Manitoba in February but the unemployment rate actually fell to 5.3 percent because there were fewer people participating in the labour market.

People in focus: Women in Canada’s economy

As we sat to down to digest the latest StatsCan employment information and write this report, millions of people around the world were participating in International Women’s Day in myriad ways. So what better day is there to focus on the role of women in Canada’s economy?

With an avowedly feminist Prime Minister and gender-balanced cabinet in Ottawa, Canada’s government is signaling to the world that this is a place where anyone, regardless of their gender, can reach the highest levels of public office. But what about those who earn their wages in the private sector or in government roles that don’t always make the front pages? Let’s take a look.

As recently as 1991, around three quarters of women aged 25 to 54 (75.9 percent) participated in Canada’s job market. This was more than three times the participation rate of 1950, but significantly short of the nearly 83 percent labour force participation rate among women in 2020. This was 10 points higher than the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) average of 73 percent.

The surge of women in the Canadian workforce coincided with socio-demographic and economic changes, such as increased participation in higher levels of education, delayed marriage and childbearing, and increased separation and divorce.

The empowerment of women and growth in the economy is not a coincidence — leading economists have long established this as a recipe for economic success not just in Canada, but pretty much anywhere — but Canada still has some work to do if it is to be viewed as completely egalitarian when it comes to gender and the economy.

Yes, women’s average personal income has increased in the last 40 years, but it’s still the case that not all women are receiving the same wage as men for the same work at the same location. However, the gap appears to be closing as a 2020 StatsCan reportrevealed that between 1976 and 2015, women’s average personal income increased by $19,200, from $16,100 to $35,300 (in constant 2015 dollars), but there is no doubt that more needs to be done.

At Moving2Canada, we are delighted to have welcomed two amazing, talented women to the team over the past few months and we would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge all they do for the Moving2Canada team. Thank you, Maria and Shannon!

Finally, if you would like to join the team at Moving2Canada, then you’re in luck as we’re hiring! Visit our Careers Page for more information.

Moving2Canada Jobs Report: January 2020

Between Express Entry and the Parent and Grandparent Program, Canada invited more than 40,000 new immigration applications in January. Throw in another 40,000 or so who were invited to apply under the International Experience Canada (IEC) program, and you’ve already got the equivalent of a small city of newcomers-to-be now well on their way to Canada this year, with plenty more to come. Luckily for them, they’ll be arriving in a Canada that boasts steady economic growth and plenty of new jobs.

Last month we informed you that landed immigrants (those who have been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities, and are not Canadian by birth or by virtue of a study, work permit or refugee claimants) had an unemployment rate of 5.8 percent. Well, this month we are pleased to report that this figure has remained constant.

The number of people employed in Canada grew by 67,000 in January. However, the unemployment rate increased by 0.2 percentage points to 5.8 percent as more people looked for work in the first month of the year.

Looking at the unemployment figures from a provincial perspective, it was a little bit of a mixed bag as Quebec and most of the Atlantic provinces saw their unemployment numbers fall, while out west Alberta and British Columbia saw their respective rates rise.

Canada job market: latest unemployment figures

From an industry viewpoint, much of the positive news in January was thanks to a 34,000 figure increase in the wholesale and retail trades. While jobs in the professional, scientific and technical services increased by 29,000 in January.

Canada Job Market January 2020 update

New Canadian employment figures are released each month, and you’ll always find the latest data here on our Moving2Canada Jobs Report.

Landed immigrant unemployment rate continues to fall

The news that landed immigrants now have an unemployment rate of 5.8 percent is undoubtedly a welcome development. It is also further evidence that the Canadian government’s pro-immigrant policies are having a real and positive impact on the Canadian economy.

The concerted efforts of the Canadian government to implement pro-immigrant policies that attract the best and brightest to Canada, combined with the typically strong work ethic of immigrants who come to the country ,means that this relationship is likely to remain mutually beneficial for the months and years ahead. What’s more, given that 2020 is an election year in Canada, it should come as no surprise that this positive story will be one that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party will bring to voters across Canada this coming October.

A deeper dive into immigrant employment trends in Canada shows that that two of the three groups measured by Statistics Canada — those who landed here more than five years ago, and those who landed here more than five but less than 10 years ago — saw year-on-year decreases in January 2020 for new totals of 8.6 and 7 percent, respectively.

Finally from a continent-specific point of view, the North and Latin American populations in Canada both saw their unemployment rates fall in January, while the Asian number stayed the same at 5.9 percent.

Notice: Immigrant unemployment rates are not available in seasonally adjusted statistics.

Employment up over 327,000 since January 2020

The standout figure from January in terms of overall employment was that there was a year-on-year increase in overall employment of 327,000, or 1.8 percent. Over the same period, total hours worked rose by 1.2 percent.

Overall employment gains were almost entirely driven by private sector job growth, while the number of self-employed people decreased and the number of public sector employees remained pretty constant.

Finally, from a demographic perspective, employment increased for both young women and men aged 15 to 24, as well as for men aged 55 and over. At the same time, employment was down for women aged 55 and over.

Slight rise in unemployment rate but many provinces still moving in the right direction

The first month of 2020 saw the unemployment rate across Canada increase by 0.2 percentage points for a new total of 5.8 percent.

Taken in isolation, this may look like bad news. However, the reality is that even though the unemployment rate increased slightly this month, the reality is that many provinces saw their month-on-month figures drop. From our informative graphic above you can see that almost all the Atlantic provinces, as well as Quebec, experienced declines in their respective provincial unemployment rates last month. By contrast, the western provinces of Alberta and B.C. saw their rates rise slightly.

Industry in focus: Construction

The latest BuildForce Canada labour market report for the construction sector points to the fact that the demand for labour looks set to be strong in British Columbia for the next decade. By contrast, BC’s westerly neighbours, Alberta and Saskatchewan, look set to endure some short-term declines, but the medium- and long-term future looks far more promising with housing and capital projects both expected to contribute positively to the construction industry in both provinces. Out east, Prince Edward Island looks set to have its busiest construction season ever in 2020, but labour shortages, a consistent theme of this month’s report, may prove problematic.

More broadly, the construction outlook across Canada remains positive if a little less vibrant than many would like. Almost full employment combined with six-straight quarters of higher spending in the non-residential segment and progress on several major projects should have confidence at an all time high as we move into 2020. However, a number of legacy issues from 2020, including skilled labour shortages and technology integration concerns, mean that certain construction experts hold reservations about the growth potential in 2020.

Touching on the retirement conundrum facing the Canadian construction industry in 2020, Moving2Canada founder and Outpost Recruitment head, Ruairi Spillane had this to say:

“In 2020, it is likely that we will see more construction workers retire. These skilled positions need to be filled if the growth experienced by the construction industry in Canada recently is to continue. To be clear, this is not a BC-specific issue. If you look at cities like Toronto there is a clear shortage of skilled labour, and this can cause delays and cancellation of projects. In my mind, the most efficient way of solving this problem is to ensure skilled immigrant workers are in a position to access these jobs.”

At Moving2Canada, we feel that there is a great opportunity for the current labour shortages and projected concerns in the construction sector to be filled by skilled immigrants who can often move to Canada through one of the country’s economic programs and integrate quickly into their job and life here in Canada.

Alberta Announces New Immigration Streams | Canada Immigration News

Alberta has announced major changes to the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) starting in January 2020! The number of streams will be drastically reduced to streamline the process and make immigration more responsive to the province’s needs.

Currently, the Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) operates seven distinct immigration programs in three different streams.

Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program Streams

The Strategic Recruitment Stream:

The Employer-Driven Stream:


Finally, the Self-Employed Farmer Stream.

Each of these programs has its own eligibility criteria and application guide

New Alberta Opportunity Stream

However, as of January 2, 2020, a new Alberta Opportunity Stream will replace the Strategic Recruitment and Employer-Driven Streams. To be eligible for this new stream, you have to be working in Alberta in an eligible occupation when you apply. You also need to score at least CLB 4 in all four language abilities in English or French, have at least high school level education, and a minimum of two years of work experience.

This stream will not be aligned with Express Entry, which means that applicants won’t have to compete with everyone else in the federal Express Entry pool. It also means that a wider range of occupations are acceptable. In fact, most occupations classified as National Occupational Classification (NOC) skill levels 0, A, B, C, and D are eligible under the AINP, as long as they are not listed on the Alberta Opportunity Stream Ineligible Occupations list.

Alberta Opportunity Stream Ineligible Occupation List

NOC Code Skill Level Occupation Title
11 Legislators
0014* Senior Managers — Religious Occupations only
422 School Principals and Administrators of Elementary and Secondary Education
423 Managers in Social, Community and Correctional Services
433 Commissioned Officers of the Canadian Forces
651 Managers in Customer and Personal Services, n.e.c.
4031 A Secondary School Teachers
4032 A Elementary School and Kindergarten Teachers
4154 A Professional Occupations in Religion
5121 A Authors and Writers
5133 A Musicians and Singers
5134 A Dancers
5135 A Actors and Comedians
5136 A Painters, Sculptors and Other Visual Artists
1215* B Supervisors, Partspersons only
1227 B Court Officers and Justices of the Peace
2225 B Landscape and Horticulture Technicians and Specialists
2243 B Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics
3223* B Dental Laboratory Bench Workers only
4214 B Early Childhood Educators and Assistants (may only apply to Employer-Driven Stream — Skilled Worker Category and are subject to specific criteria)
4216 B Other Instructors
4217 B Other Religious Occupations
5232 B Other Performers, n.e.c.
5244 B Artisans and Craftspersons
5251 B Athletes
6232 B Real Estate Agents and Salespersons
6313* B Casino Occupations Supervisors only
6321 B Chefs
6322 B Cooks
6332 B Bakers
6341 B Hairstylists and Barbers
7201 B Contractors and Supervisors, Machining, Metal Forming, Shaping and Erecting Trades and Related Occupations
7202 B Contractors and Supervisors, Electrical Trades and Telecommunications Occupations
7203 B Contractors and Supervisors, Pipefitting Trades
7204 B Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
7205* B Contractors and Supervisors, Bricklayers, Concrete Finishers, Floorcovering Installers, Glaziers, Insulators, Painters and Decorators, Roofers, Lathers (Interior Systems Mechanics only) and Tilesetters only
7231 B Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors
7232 B Tool and Die Makers
7233 B Sheet Metal Workers
7234 B Boilermakers
7235 B Structural Metal and Platework Fabricators and Fitters
7236 B Ironworkers
7237 B Welders and Related Machine Operators
7241 B Electricians (except Industrial and Power System)
7242 B Industrial Electricians
7243 B Power System Electricians
7244 B Electrical Power Line and Cable Workers
7245 B Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers
7246 B Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers
7247 B Cable Television Service and Maintenance Technicians
7251 B Plumbers
7252 B Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers
7253 B Gasfitters
7271 B Carpenters
7272 B Cabinetmakers
7281 B Bricklayers
7282 B Concrete Finishers
7283 B Tilesetters
7284* B Lathers — Interior Systems Mechanics only
7291 B Roofers and Shinglers
7292 B Glaziers
7293 B Insulators
7294 B Painters and Decorators (except interior decorators)
7295 B Floor Covering Installers
7301 B Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
7302* B Contractors and Supervisors, Crane Operators and Water Well Drillers only
7311 B Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics, except Textile Machinery Mechanics and Repairers
7312 B Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
7313 B Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanics
7318 B Elevator Constructors and Mechanics
7321 B Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers
7322 B Motor Vehicle Body Repairers
7332 B Appliance Servicers and Repairers
7333 B Electrical Mechanics
7334 B Motorcycle, All-Terrain Vehicle and Other Related Mechanics
7335* B Outdoor Power Equipment Technicians only
7371 B Crane Operators
7373 B Water Well Drillers
7384* B Recreation Vehicle Service Technicians and Locksmiths only
8222 B Contractors and Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Services
8232 B Oil and Gas Well Drillers, Servicers, Testers and Related Workers
8255 B Contractors and Supervisors, Landscaping, Grounds Maintenance and Horticulture Services
1522* C Partspersons only
4411 C Home Child Care Providers
4412 C Home Support Workers, Housekeepers and Related Occupations
4413 C Elementary and Secondary School Teacher Assistants
6513 C Food and Beverage Servers
6533 C Casino Occupations
6564 C Other Personal Service Occupations
7513 C Taxi and Limousine Drivers and Chauffeurs
7522* C Utility Arborists
8442 C Trappers and Hunters
9461* C Tobacco Processing Machine Operators only
9462 C Industrial Butchers and Meat Cutters, Poultry Preparers, and Related Workers
9463 C Fish and Seafood Plant Workers
6541 D Security Guards and Related Security Service Occupations
6611 D Cashiers
6621 D Service Station Attendants
6622 D Store Shelf Stockers, Clerks and Order Fillers
6623 D Other Sales Related Occupations
6711 D Food Counter Attendants, Kitchen Helpers and Related Support Occupations
6721 D Support Occupations in Accommodation, Travel and Facilities Set-Up Services, except Facilities Porters
6722 D Operators and Attendants in Amusement, Recreation and Sport
6731 D Light Duty Cleaners
6732 D Specialized Cleaners
6733 D Janitors, Caretakers and Building Superintendents
6741 D Dry Cleaning, Laundry and Related Occupations
6742 D Other Service Support Occupations, n.e.c.
7611 D Construction Trades Helpers and Labourers
7612 D Other Trades Helpers and Labourers
7621 D Public Works and Maintenance Labourers
7622 D Railway and Motor Transport Labourers
8611 D Harvesting Labourers
8612 D Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance Labourers
8613 D Aquaculture and Marine Harvest Labourers
8614 D Mine Labourers
8615 D Oil and Gas Drilling, Servicing and Related Labourers
8616 D Logging and Forestry Labourers
9611 D Labourers in Mineral and Metal Processing
9612 D Labourers in Metal Fabrication
9613 D Labourers in Chemical Products Processing and Utilities
9614 D Labourers in Wood, Pulp and Paper Processing
9615 D Labourers in Rubber and Plastic Products Manufacturing
9616 D Labourers in Textile Processing
9617 D Labourers in Food, Beverage and Associated Products Processing
9618 D Labourers in Fish and Seafood Processing
9619 D Other Labourers in Processing, Manufacturing and Utilities

Alberta Express Entry Stream

At the same time, Alberta will be launching a new Alberta Express Entry stream, which will allow AINP to nominate candidates in the federal Express Entry pool for permanent residence. The Express Entry system was launched in 2015, and since then many provinces have launched streams aligned with Express Entry. A nomination from one of these streams grants candidates 600 additional Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points, virtually guaranteeing the candidate will receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence in the following Express Entry draw.

Alberta hasn’t released much information yet about how the Alberta Express Entry stream will work. Some provincial programs automatically invite Express Entry candidates to apply based on their Express Entry profile, while others require candidates to actively monitor them and submit applications. Some streams are open to applications at any time, others have specific intake periods.

Opportunities in Alberta

The Albertan economy was one of the strongest in the world, in large part because of the Alberta oil sands. Canada was the fourth largest oil exporter in 2015, and it’s estimated that the Alberta oil sands contain about 13 percent of the world’s oil reserves.

This vast natural resource had lead to major investment in the province and in the oil industry. When the price of oil is high, Alberta has a booming economy. However, oil isn’t the only major industry in the province. Alberta is the most western prairie province and, as in all three prairie provinces, agriculture and forestry are major parts of the economy.

With oil prices expected to rise, the Government of Alberta is trying to restructure the AINP to be more responsive to labour market needs, and to find ways to bring in workers to meet this upcoming labour demand.

The new Alberta Opportunity Stream will provide a pathway to permanent residence for temporary foreign workers already in the province, many of whom work in the Agriculture and Forestry industries, or in Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction.

On the other hand, the new Alberta Express Entry stream will probably focus on recruiting foreign workers with education or work experience in the same industries that are currently targeted by the Strategic Recruitment and Employer-Driven streams, such as engineers, skilled trades, and agricultural workers.

One of the major benefits of switching over to an Express Entry-aligned system is the faster processing times. As of today, an application for permanent residence as a provincial nominee not through Express Entry is quoted at 16 months. On the other hand, applications processed through Express Entry are quoted at 6 months or less!

At Canadim, we are experts in Canadian immigration law. Canadian immigration policies and practices change all the time. It’s our job to know what changes are coming, but we recognize that you’re hugely invested in the process too. That’s why we do our best to keep you informed about recent Canadian Immigration news. If you’d like to receive these updates by email, sign up for our Newsletter.

Understanding Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program Strategy 2020-2020

Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program under the Expression of Interest System

UPDATES: Draw #33 – August 15, 2020

SKILLED WORKERS IN MANITOBA

  • Number of Letters of Advice to Apply issued: 401
  • Ranking score of lowest-ranked candidate invited: 585

SKILLED WORKERS OVERSEAS

  • Number of Letters of Advice to Apply issued: 42 who were invited directly by the MPNP under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative
  • Ranking score of lowest-ranked candidate invited: 719

The government of Manitoba has released a new Labour Market Strategy for immigration through the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP). In order to understand the Premier of Manitoba, Canada, Brian Pallister’s approach, here’s his Conservative Government Immigration Strategy for 2020. This will continue until 2020, the end of his term unless he will be voted again.

Based on the Conservative Platform, they will focus to have “Better Jobs” in Manitoba.

“6. Encouraging New Immigration by enhancing the Provincial Nominee Program to welcome MORE QUALIFIED and SKILLED IMMIGRANTS from around the world as well as encouraging increased family immigration.” – Conservative’s 10-point Economic Growth Plan

In the previous MPNP Immigration policy, here is the percentage on how they accept applicants:

Skilled Workers Overseas – are applicants who are internationally trained and experienced workers who have skills in the local labor market. One major factor is they also demonstrate an established connection to Manitoba thru family or relatives. It was usually no job offer or no employer yet needed.

For the previous years, Skilled Workers Overseas (no job offer) – 59.8% applicants have been accepted.

Strategic Recruitment Initiatives – allows the province to nominate qualified persons for immigration. The province usually held Information Sessions or Job Fairs to different countries and recruit eligible applicants.

The Morden’s Community Driven Immigration Initiative Skilled Worker Program is also under this category.

For the previous years, Strategic Recruitment Initiatives – 6.9% applicants have been accepted only.

Farm Strategic Recruitment Initiative is for individuals with proven farm business experience, sufficient available capital to invest, and who intend to establish and operate a farm operation in rural Manitoba. They have accepted applicants for 0.1%.

General Business – These are who wants to put a business in Manitoba. The Business Immigration to Morden is under this program. It’s about 1.9% applicants have been accepted.

Skilled Worker in Manitoba – applicants who have a strong connection to the province through ongoing employment and sufficient skills, education and training, work experience and official language proficiency to make an immediate and ongoing contribution to the Manitoba economy. These are usually International Students/Graduates that have job offer. These are also Temporary Foreign Workers in Manitoba who apply for PR status.

For the previous years, Skilled Worker in Manitoba has accepted 31.3% applicants.

Now, the approach of the Progressive Conservative platform for MPNP 2020-2020 is the following. Their target percentage for each program are indicated:

Skilled Workers IN Manitoba – Total of 49.8%


  • International Students/Graduates nominated with a job offer – 35.6%
  • Temporary Foreign Workers (with a job offer) – 14.2%

Strategic Recruitment Initiatives with a job offer (usually come from Overseas Job Fairs) – 21.4%

Skilled Worker Overseas which they redefine it to have “matched jobs”. But its details have not been released properly. – 23.8%

New Business Streams – 0.3%

General Business Stream – 4.5%

Farm Strategic Recruitment Initiative – 0.3%

Furthermore, there will be a new MPNP skilled worker non- refundable application fee of $500 for applicants invited to submit a complete application which took effect last May 15, 2020.

As you can see, it is hard for the Skilled Worker Overseas to apply. There is a drop of 36% for applicants that will be recruited in that category. But it is some good news for all the International Students and Temporary Foreign Workers applying for PR status. It is because somehow they are the priority in these strategies. There is an increase of 18.5% in their category that will be accepted in the MPNP.

Furthermore, here is the latest EOI Draw #32 which was posted on July 11, 2020.

Registered Nurses, Secondary and Elementary School Teachers, Vocational and College Instructors, University Professors, General and Specialist Physicians have not been considered in this draw unless they were directly invited by the MPNP under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative

For MPNP-Business Category, 84 applications including those from Farm Strategic Recruitment Initiative were received for the months of May and June 2020.

Fact. Did you know that the last EOI draw for Skilled Workers Overseas was Aug. 24, 2020? With the following details:

Since then, it was stopped and they were focused on the Strategic Recruitment Initiative Category. It has been almost a year now, maybe this August 2020; it is time for them to make that kind of EOI draw again. Well, let’s hope for the best.

Furthermore, here are some strategies might be applicable to you for MPNP 2020 and beyond:

  1. If you are a Skilled Worker Overseas, aim a ranking score of at least 600pts.
  2. If you are an International Student Graduate or Temporary Foreign Worker, now is the best time to apply for PR status.
  3. If you are aiming for Strategic Recruitment Initiative, try the Morden immigration Program or watch out for upcoming Information Sessions and Job Fairs. But take note that during Job Fairs, they wanted you to already have a valid IELTS score and Education Assessment.

You can also join Filipino Portal In Canada Support Group on where you can post questions, ask insights and guidance regarding Canadian Immigration Programs. In this social media group, fellow Filipinos across Canada might help answer your queries and give you some important reminders.

Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)

Almost all Canadian work permits require a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), formerly called a Labor Market Opinion (LMO), in order hire a temporary foreign worker.

What is a Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA)?

An LMIA is a labor market verification process whereby Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) assesses an offer of employment to ensure that the employment of a foreign worker will not have a negative impact on the Canadian labor market. Employers will be required to provide a variety of information about the position for which they want to hire a foreign worker, including the number of Canadians who applied for the position, the number of Canadians who were interviewed, and detailed explanations for why the Canadian workers considered were not hired.

In their analysis of the offer of employment, ESDC will consider the following elements:

Is the salary offered to the foreign worker consistent with the average for the occupation in the area the position is located?

Are the working conditions consistent with labor laws and/or collective bargaining agreements?

Is there a labor shortage for that occupation in the area the position is located?

Is there an ongoing labor dispute in the company and/or industry?

Has the Canadian employer undertaken recruitment efforts in order to find a Canadian to fill the position?

Will the foreign worker be able to transfer unique skills or expertise to Canadians?

Will hiring the foreign worker help to create or retain jobs for Canadians?

Will the foreign worker be the employee of the Canadian employer, whereby the foreign worker is expected to work on a full-time basis at a pre-determined wage?

Generally speaking, for jobs located in one of Canada’s major cities, the more specialized the position and the higher the salary offered, the higher the chances of obtaining a positive LMIA will be. In less populated cities and regions, this is still true but generally obtaining an LMIA may be easier.

LMIA Based Work Permits:

Typically, foreign workers and employers must go through a two-step process in order to receive a Canadian work permit. First, the applicant must submit an application to ESDC for a Labor Market Impact Assessment, followed by a second application to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) for the actual work permit. The LMIA is issued by ESDC who, after considering numerous protective labour market factors, authorizes the Canadian employer to hire a foreign worker.

In June 2014, it was announced that work permits for foreign workers who require a LMIA will only be granted for a period of 1 year for all low-wage occupations.

How Long Does it take to Obtain a Labour Market Impact Assessment?

ESDC has committed to a 10 business day service standard for certain LMIA applications. The 10 day processing will only be available for applications pertaining to jobs in high demand (such as skilled trades), jobs offering wages in the top 10% of wages earned by Canadians in that province or territory, and for jobs with a short duration work period (less than 120 days).

ESDC offices are responsible for processing LMIA applications, and there are ESDC offices exist in every Canadian province.

Requirements for Employers Applying for an LMIA:

Effective as of June 2014, all employers wishing to hire a temporary foreign worker to Canada must pay a processing fee of $1,000 CDN tied to each request for a labour market opinion. A “privilege fee” of $100 CDN is also required.

English and French must be the only languages that can be distinguished as job requirements both for LMIAs and for job vacancy advertisements unless the employer can prove that another language is otherwise required.

Employers must also advertise all job vacancies in the Canadian job market for at least four weeks before applying for an LMIA and are required to prove that they have used at least two other recruitment methods in addition to having posted an advertisement on the Canadian Job Bank website. Employers must focus advertising efforts on groups of Canadians who are under-represented, such as Aboriginals or persons with disabilities.

When employers are applying for LMIA for high-wage positions, they are also required to submit a transition plan to ESDC with their LMIA. The transition plan should indicate how the company plans to reduce their reliance on temporary foreign workers. Proof of investment in skills training or hiring Canadian apprentices are examples of how employers can prove they plan to reduce their reliance on temporary foreign workers. Proof that the employer is assisting their high-skilled temporary foreign worker in becoming a Canadian permanent resident can also qualify as the transition plan. If the employer is chosen for an inspection or if they apply to renew their LMIA, they will be required to report on the progress of their transition plan.

Employers are required to attest to their awareness that they are prohibited from laying off or cutting the hours of Canadian workers if they employ foreign workers.

Employers should be mindful of a number of criteria that affect whether or not ESDC will process an LMIA application. Currently, if an employer’s LMIA application meets all of the following criteria, it will not be processed:

The occupation listed on the LMIA is as defined as a job in Accommodations, Food Service or Retail Sales. Under the North American Industry Classification System (NAIC), these occupations are classified as NAIC type 72, 44, or 45.

The occupation listed is categorized as Skill Level D in the National Occupation Classification.

The economic region where the job is to take place has an annual unemployment rate of over 6%.

Employers hiring for certain occupations, such as airlines requesting foreign pilots, may face additional requirements. Contact FWCanada for details.

For more information about the LMIA process or for assistance bringing a foreign worker to Canada, fill out our assessment form.

FWCanada is a Montreal-based immigration law firm that provides professional legal services on Canadian immigration. For more tips and updates on Canadian immigration follow FWCanada on Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin.

Skilled Enough? Employment Outcomes for Recent Economic Migrants in Canada Compared to Australia

  • Lesleyanne Hawthorne

Abstract

Canada and Australia represent highly comparable settlement sites for degree-qualified migrants. Economic migrants, however, now perform better in Australia post-arrival. Greater proportions of new arrivals in Australia than in Canada secure positions quickly, access professional or managerial status, earn high salaries and use their credentials in work. In the process, unprecedented numbers are avoiding the labour market displacement and over-qualification typically associated with select birthplace, language, age and gender-related groups. This chapter demonstrates the extent to which labour market outcomes are amenable to influence by policy change, given the sustained benefits flowing to Australia following its post-1999 economic migration reform.

Keywords

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to gratefully acknowledge that this chapter is based on contrastive Canada–Australia policy research commissioned by the Canadian government (Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Statistics Canada), first reported by agreement in “The Impact of Economic Selection Policy on Labour Market Outcomes for Degree-Qualified Migrants in Canada and Australia,” L. Hawthorne, Institute for Research on Public Policy, VOL. 14, No 5, 2008.

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