Protection, Security and Investigation Канада


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The investigation

When an investigation is warranted, an investigator reviews the file and collects any relevant or missing information regarding the allegation or concern raised. Once the file review is completed, the investigation proceeds by methods such as:

  • Fact-finding meeting
    The investigator will meet with all persons involved in the investigation together e.g., human resources advisors, candidate, hiring manager;
  • Individual or group interviews
    The investigator will meet with each person involved in the investigation, individually or in separate groups;
  • Written submissions
    The investigator will communicate with persons involved in the investigation in writing in order to gather the necessary information; or
  • A combination of these methods.

Interviews and fact-finding meetings are recorded and testimonies are provided under oath or solemn affirmation.

During the investigation, a Factual Report may be drafted and disclosed, partially or in its entirety, to persons involved in the investigation for comments and submission. This Factual Report contains the relevant evidence gathered during the investigation. After receiving comments and submissions, the investigator will then proceed with the analysis and conclusion.

The Investigation Report

An Investigation Report, which includes the analysis and conclusion, is prepared by the investigator and shared with the organizations and persons affected.

If the allegation or concern raised is unfounded, the file is closed.

If the allegation or concern raised is founded, the Commission considers whether to order corrective action. In cases of fraud in an appointment process, the Commission may also decide to provide a copy of the Investigation Report and any relevant information to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, pursuant to section 133 of the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA).

In cases where the investigation of an internal appointment process was requested by a deputy head under subsection 67(2) of the PSEA , the Investigation Report is prepared by the Investigations Branch and sent to that deputy head for approval and determination of appropriate corrective action.

Duration of the investigation

Investigations are conducted as informally and expeditiously as possible and in respect of procedural fairness. The PSC strives to complete 80% of its cases at the investigation phase within 175 calendar days.

The investigation phase starts the day the decision to investigate is made and ends once the Investigation Report is sent to the organization and individuals affected.

Each investigation is unique and several variables can influence its duration. These include but are not limited to:

  • Whether or not there is an admission at the onset of the investigation;
  • Volume of investigations at a given time;
  • Complexity of the investigation;
  • Availability of resources (e.g., subject matter experts);
  • Availability and number of persons involved in the investigation; and
  • Time required to obtain information from the persons or organizations involved in the investigation.

Powers of the Public Service Commission investigators

PSC investigators have all the powers under Part II of the Inquiries Act. This means that investigators may issue subpoenas to compel witnesses to testify and/or to produce documents. Investigators may also enter and remain within any public office or institution, examine all papers, documents, vouchers, records and books belonging to the public office or institution and may administer the oath or solemn affirmation.

Pursuant to Section 135 of the PSEA , deputy heads and employees shall provide the Commission with any facilities, assistance, information and access to their respective offices.

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Protection, Security and Investigation

Protection, Security and Investigation

Сообщение Zizit » 27 ноя 2020, 01:07

Очень во многих колледжах Канады есть программа «Protection, Security and Investigation».

Есть кто нибудь кто по ней учился и может рассказать что это такое? Есть ли перспективы для иммигрантов в этой сфере деятельности?

Protection, Security and Investigation

General information

Intake information

Start date Campus
Fall 2020 Orillia

Program description

Students develop knowledge and skills demanded by the rapidly evolving safety and security industry. Areas of study include investigative techniques, defensive skills and use of force theory, security procedures, crisis intervention, emergency management and cyber security.

During a common first year with the Police Foundations and Community and Justice Services programs, students are provided with an overall understanding of criminal justice and law enforcement in Canada, and they have the opportunity to transfer between these programs after the first year. Second-year students develop the specialized knowledge and skills demanded by today’s security and investigation industry.

Additional program specific fees for Protection, Security and Investigation


Transfer options

A common first year with the Community and Justice Services and Police Foundations programs provides students with an overall understanding of criminal justice and law enforcement in Canada and also allows students the opportunity to transfer between programs after the first year of study and possibly receive all three credential in four years.

Graduating students may also have the opportunity to further their studies at the degree level and may receive up to two years of advanced standing (see Diploma to degree pathways) toward our unique four-year Bachelor of Human Services — Police Studies degree.

Career opportunities

Graduates may find employment in government organizations, corporate and industrial security agencies, the armed forces, police services, hotels, casinos and retail establishments or be self-employed in the security industry. Graduates are eligible to write the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services examinations which are mandatory for private investigators and security guards in Ontario. Under the Private Security and Investigative Services Act 2005, only candidates who pass the examinations are allowed to apply for a private investigator and/or security guard license.

Admission information

Admission requirements

OSSD or equivalent with

  • Grade 12 English (C or U)

Mature students, non-secondary school applicants (19 years or older), and home school applicants may also be considered for admission. Eligibility may be met by applicants who have taken equivalent courses, upgrading, completed their GED, and equivalency testing. For complete details refer to: www.georgiancollege.ca/admissions/policies-procedures/

Pathways

Applicants who have taken courses from a recognized and accredited post-secondary institution and/or have relevant life/learning experience may also be considered for admission; refer to the Credit Transfer Centre website for details:
www.georgiancollege.ca/admissions/credit-transfer/

Admission details

Students are required to sign a waiver indicating they are physically and medically able to participate in strenuous physical activity.

Fleming College

Ontario College Diploma in Protection, Security and Investigation

Start Dates:

September 2020

Program Highlights

Security, intelligence and investigation professionals work both in the front lines and behind the scenes to “protect Canadian businesses, institutions, infrastructure and people”. In the Protection, Security and Investigation (PSI) program you will develop the knowledge, skills and capabilities to work in a wide variety of roles. The PSI sector is recognized as one of the fastest growing fields in the world. Unlike other programs that focus more on security guard training, our focus is on new concepts in technology, intelligence analytics and investigative skills. This diverse range of marketable skills are essential to your success as an industry professional.

  • Our program’s strength is our faculty members who have extensive experience across all PSI industries including corporate security, policing, health & safety, loss prevention, hospital security, fire prevention, security technologies, cyber security and intelligence
  • Each faculty member will share their unique skills, expertise and experience and introduce you to their extensive network of industry contacts
  • We are affiliated with many PSI industry professional organizations including, ASIS International, CPTED Ontario, Council of Private Investigators Ontario (CPIO), International Association for Health Care Security & Safety
  • Apply what you have learned in real-word settings with a wide variety of field placement opportunities and applied projects working with community partners
  • Our unique curriculum includes training in crime prevention through environmental design concepts, intelligence and analytics, investigation skills, cyber security techniques, online investigations and emerging security technologies
  • An active advisory committee with members who are senior security managers, and strong partnerships with local municipalities, corporations and emergency services, will help you make additional industry connections
  • You’ll attend industry networking, recruiting and mentoring events to help plan your career path and build a professional network. Events include, Canadian Security Magazine Career Expo, ASIS Student Appreciation Dinner and other PSI industry job fairs, workshops and expos
  • You will complete the training for industry qualifications including:
    • Security Guard License
    • Private Investigator’s License
    • Certified Healthcare Security Officer (CHSO) Certification from IAHSS
    • Basic Emergency Management Certification

The program prepared me to enter a corporate work environment confidently and with the base knowledge that I needed to do my job well. I found TD through my placement and I have worked here for five years. In my roles as an Intelligence Security Analyst and now a Physical Security Risk Analyst, I continue to apply various topics that I learned in the program including the intelligence cycle, legal research, physical security threat and risk assessments (STRA), and crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED).”

Lindsay Redgate, Physical Security Risk Analyst, Global Security & Investigations, TD Bank

Common First Semester

Students in our Law and Justice Diploma programs take the same courses for the first semester. This common focus exposes you to a variety of career options and other programs, while you acquire a base of knowledge and fundamental skills which are common to all justice programs. Having the common first semester enables you to change direction if you find another justice program or career area is more appealing to you. If you decide to change from one justice program to another, you can enter the new justice program in semester two, subject to enrolment capacity. Having the option to change your mind gives you the comfort of knowing you have not lost any time or tuition dollars and you will be on track with your new justice program. The Law and Justice Diploma programs sharing the Common First Semester include Community and Justice Services, Customs Border Services, Law Clerk, Paralegal, Police Foundations, and Protection Security and Investigation.

“Through meetings with faculty during the common first semester, I learned about the field of Protection, Security and Investigation and the wide variety of career options available, and this really appealed to me. You can pursue all different kinds of opportunities including integrated security, corporate security or investigations, which is where I am now. In my role at Profile Investigation, I am responsible for administration in our investigations department.”

James Skinner, Profile Investigation Inc.

University Grad?

Are you a university graduate? You may be eligible for direct entry into an upper semester of this program and graduate in as little as 12 months. Please contact the program coordinator, for more information.

Work Experience

Upon successful completion of your courses, you will be eligible to complete a 120-hour field placement with one of our community partners.

Private and public enforcement roles, government investigations, and facility protection have grown to include hundreds of thousands of positions in Canada, which means you’ll be in demand as a specialist and manager with applicable specialized training. Positions in the industry include:

  • security manager
  • project manager
  • security sales
  • security design
  • corporate investigator
  • executive protection consultant
  • VIP personal security

  • event security management specialist
  • government enforcement officer
  • bank investigator
  • insurance investigator
  • intelligence analyst
  • private investigator
  • risk management specialist
  • fire and safety security specialist
  • casino security, surveillance and investigations
  • hospital security guard
  • armored car escort
  • by-law enforcement officer
  • animal control and protection officer
  • special constable
  • police officer

With your highly regarded Fleming College diploma, you’ll find your career advances quickly. Our graduates have moved into management positions fairly soon after they land their first job. In the Canadian security industry, security managers or professionals with several years of experience and education can expect to make $45,000.00 — $65,000.00 annually. Professionals with 5-10 years industry experience can expect to make $65,000 — $100,000+.

Watch this video, which features Fleming College, to learn about this worthwhile experience.

With your highly regarded Fleming College diploma, you’ll find your career advances quickly. Our graduates have moved into management positions fairly soon after they land their first job. In the Canadian industrial security industry, security managers or professionals with several years of experience and education can expect to make $45,000.00 — $65,000.00 annually.

Indigenous Perspectives Designation

The Indigenous Perspectives Designation (IPD) is an option available to students studying in theProtection, Security and Investigation program. To qualify for the IPD, students must take and successfully complete GNED49 — Introduction to Indigenous Studies and GNED128 — Indigenous Knowledges, along with a minimum of four approved co-curricular Indigenous events or experiences that will be incorporated into the final portfolio assignment in GNED128. The student’s transcript will indicate the IPD designation. Upon graduation, students with an IPD will have a strong foundational basis in Indigenous Studies, and a designation that will be marketable in the employment sector.

Related Programs

If you haven’t yet decided what kind of law enforcement or justice career you’d like to pursue, check out the Law Clerk, or Police Foundations programs.

Additional Costs

Plan on $800 per year for books and supplies.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Students applying to Protection, Security and Investigation must meet the following requirements:

  • OSSD including Gr 12 C English

OSSD with majority of courses at College (C ) or Open (O) unless otherwise stated.
Grade 12 C courses will be accepted where Gr 11 C course requirements are listed.
Where College level courses are listed, U and M courses will be accepted.

Mature Students

If you are 19 years of age or older before classes start, and you do not possess an OSSD, you can write the Canadian Adult Achievement Test to assess your eligibility for admission. Additional testing or academic upgrading may be necessary to meet specific course requirements for this program.

Tuition Detail

Tuition and ancillary fees are subject to change without notice. The fees presented below reflect Fall start programs only for the current academic year. For details about the fee differences for other program start dates please refer to the Tuition Details chart below.

View complete tuition details
Domestic Students
historical Amount
academic-year Amount
Semester 1 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health Plan $280.00
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Integrated Transportation Fee $365.00
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $1,290.38
Total $2,458.62
Semester 2 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $1,290.38
Total $2,272.62
Semester 3 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health Plan $280.00
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Integrated Transportation Fee $365.00
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $1,290.38
Total $2,458.62
Semester 4 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $1,290.38
Total $2,272.62

The fees above are for the current academic year for domestic students. Please note that the fees reflect the Health Plan and Integrated Transportation (Sutherland Programs only) charges for the fall entry point. These charges are applied up front and provide service coverage for a full year September to August. The charges for the winter and spring terms are as follows:

Health Plan Integrated Transportation Coverage
Winter $180.50 $255.50 January to August
Spring $129.50 $142.35 January to August
International Students
Semester 1 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Integrated Transportation Fee $365.00
International Health Plan $708.43
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $6,775.00
Total $8,371.67
Semester 2 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $6,775.00
Total $8,203.09
Semester 3 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Integrated Transportation Fee $365.00
International Health Plan $708.43
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $6,775.00
Total $8,371.67
Semester 4 Amount
*Alumni Fee $14.61
*Student Administrative Council Clubs $2.80
*Student Administrative Council Governance $8.00
*Student Administrative Council Provincial Advocacy $5.00
*Student Food Bank $1.25
Academic Supports $32.52
Athletics and Recreation $67.81
Career Services $13.43
Health and Counselling $48.91
Information Technology Fee $99.81
Peterborough Sport & Wellness Centre $87.55
Student Achievement & Records $11.55
Student Building Fee $48.00
Student Building Fund $42.00
Student Centre Renovation Fund $40.00
Tuition $6,775.00
Total $8,203.09

The fees above are for the current academic year for international students. Please note that the fees reflect the Health Plan and Integrated Transportation (Sutherland Programs only) charges for the fall entry point. These charges are applied up front and provide service coverage for a full year September to August. The charges for the winter and spring terms are as follows:

Health Plan Intergrated Transportation Coverage
Winter $645.82 $255.50 January to August
Spring $263.60 $142.35 January to August


Transfer Agreements

You may be able to use credits obtained at Fleming College to continue your postsecondary education in pursuit of a degree. The articulation and credit transfer agreements with our partner institutions are summarized below.

Global Protection Security And Investigation

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Executive Security and Investigation Services

170 Fuller Rd., Unit 6, Ajax (ON), L1S 7G8, Canada

Время работы Добавить информацию О нас Executive Security & Investigation Services (ESIS) is an owner managed agency committed to providing professional and high quality services. Миссия Executive Security and Private Investigation Services (ESIS) strives to be the provide safe, secure and professional security and investigation services. Based out of Ajax and serving the Durham Region, Toronto and surrounding GTA area with over twenty (20) years of experience and professional/personal practices. Available 24-7 to assist with your needs with a prompt response. Our professionally trained security guards and investigators will help not only protect you but also work closely with you to ensure your needs are met. By assisting and advising you on detailed and strategic planning, we will ensure your home, business and property is safe and secure. Описание Executive Security & Investigation Services is an owner managed agency committed to providing professional and high quality security and investigation services. Services include the below Security services and professional investigation services:
◾Special Event Security
◾Executive Protection
◾ Alarm Response
◾Parking Enforcement
◾Mobile Patrols
◾Private Investigation Основана Shelley Marshall Продукты Security Guard Services
Private Investigation

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Computer Security and Investigations

  • Home ›
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  • Computer Security and Investigations

General

\n Program Highlights \n

The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology. Your classes are regularly reviewed and improved to be the most current subjects demanded by the industry, such as: \n

  • Advanced Ethical Hacking \n
  • Threat and Risk Analysis \n
  • Information Security \n
  • Advanced Computer Forensics \n
  • Internet and Hacking Investigations \n
  • CISCO Network Design and Management \n
  • Network Security \n
  • Criminology \n
  • Justice Studies \n

In addition to these cutting edge subjects, you will also learn how to develop systems, procedures, and human resources to manage the risks associated with information technology — and be capable of providing technical assistance to prevent, investigate, and protect individuals and organizations from cyber-crime. Your studies will be from a security management and law enforcement perspective, with emphasis placed on both the technological and management skills required to implement information technology security, and the investigative skills necessary to respond appropriately to breaches of security. \n

You will have the added benefit of courses in law, justice, and criminology, taking advantage of Fleming College\u2020s reputation and experience in these fields, in addition to obtaining the technical training you need to function as a technological consultant. In this three-year program, the final sixth semester is an applied project or co-operative field placement in partnership with business, industry, a law enforcement agency, or government department. \n

Why Choose Fleming \n

Fleming has a well-known track record of producing talented graduates in both the Applied Computing and Engineering Science, and the Law and Justice fields. As such, you will acquire the best we have to offer—in a new, winning combination that will put you on the road to success as an in-demand computer security specialist. \n

There are no other programs like this in Ontario. The program will provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for industry certification in both the computer forensics and networking disciplines. As you progress through the program you will gain the skills required to become industry certified in a number of areas, including: \n

  • CCNA \u2013 Cisco Certified Network Architect \n
  • CCE \u2013 Certified Computer Examiner \n
  • Security+ \n
  • Network+ \n
  • A+ \n
  • Linux+ \n
  • MCSE \u2013 Microsoft Certified System Engineer \n
  • CISSP \u2013 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (student level qualification) \n
  • CEH — Certified Ethical Hacker \n
  • EnCE — Encase Certified Examiner \n

With your diploma, and these top certifications, you will demonstrate your abilities and value to the industry, gaining you the employment advantage. \n

Work Experience \n

In your final semester, you will work on an intensive team project or co-operative field placement. Each student will contribute specialized knowledge, learned in his or her program of study, to the solution of a real world technological problem posed by a sponsoring business or organization. Recent projects include: \n

  • Co-operative placements within financial and forensic firms, working real cases \n
  • Co-operative placements within corporate security departments and information security service providers \n
  • Security and penetration testing of a large Internet Service Provider \n
  • Forensic analysis and creation of standards for a security corporation \n
  • Development of a Linux based Darknet and Intrusion Detection system for a professional penetration testing company \n
  • Development and field deployment of a computer network Intrusion Detection System for a managed security service company to support large commercial clients \n

This applied project or co-operative field placement will enhance problem-solving skills, applied industry knowledge, and the ability to work as part of a team. You’ll also learn critical workplace skills such as time management, how to map a critical path, and presentation skills. Since you may be working on sophisticated developmental or research based work, sponsors will often use the project as a testing ground and recruitment opportunity. \n

Is this You? \n

  • excellent oral and written communication skills \n
  • good problem solving skills \n
  • creative and analytical thinking skills \n
  • previous computing experience \n
  • able to keep a cool head in a crisis \n
  • research and investigative skills and interest \n
  • desire to learn and be challenged \n
  • strong time management skills \n

Career Opportunities \n

Career opportunities are available in both public and private sector organizations. Job titles include: \n

  • Information Technology Security Analyst \n
  • Information Security Administrator \n
  • Computer Security Consultant \n
  • Investigator \n
  • Network Security Specialist \n
  • Computer Forensics Examiner \n
  • Digital Investigative Specialist \n

Starting salaries for many positions are $40,000 to $60,000. Industry surveys identify that IT security professionals, with the security skills you will acquire, consistently earn higher income than others in the industry. \n

Minimum Admission Requirements \n

OSSD with the majority of credits at the College (C) and Open (O) level, including: \n

  • 2 College (C) English courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12) \n
  • 2 College (C) Math courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12) \n

When (C) is the minimum course level for admission, (U) or (U\/C) courses are also accepted. \n


Mature Students \n

If you are 19 years of age or older before classes start, and you do not possess an OSSD, you can write the Canadian Adult Achievement Test to assess your eligibility for admission. Additional testing or academic upgrading may be necessary to meet specific course requirements for this program. \n

\n Advanced Standing \n

Do you have another college diploma, or have you completed other technology courses at another college or university? You may be eligible for advanced standing entry to the Computer Security and Investigations program. With this fast track option, you can quickly complete the program and become qualified to enter the field of computer security. Contact the program coordinator to find out how you can take advantage of this opportunity. \n

Transfer Agreements \n\nUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology\n»>» :price=»<"EUR":<"amount":2370>,»USD»:<"amount":2658>,»GBP»:<"amount":2034>>» :teaching-languages=»[«English»]» :startdate=»»08 September 2020″» :deadline=»null» :duration=»»6 semesters»» :instances=»[<"country":"Canada","country_

The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology. \n

\n Program Highlights \n

The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology. Your classes are regularly reviewed and improved to be the most current subjects demanded by the industry, such as: \n

  • Advanced Ethical Hacking \n
  • Threat and Risk Analysis \n
  • Information Security \n
  • Advanced Computer Forensics \n
  • Internet and Hacking Investigations \n
  • CISCO Network Design and Management \n
  • Network Security \n
  • Criminology \n
  • Justice Studies \n

In addition to these cutting edge subjects, you will also learn how to develop systems, procedures, and human resources to manage the risks associated with information technology — and be capable of providing technical assistance to prevent, investigate, and protect individuals and organizations from cyber-crime. Your studies will be from a security management and law enforcement perspective, with emphasis placed on both the technological and management skills required to implement information technology security, and the investigative skills necessary to respond appropriately to breaches of security. \n

You will have the added benefit of courses in law, justice, and criminology, taking advantage of Fleming College\u2020s reputation and experience in these fields, in addition to obtaining the technical training you need to function as a technological consultant. In this three-year program, the final sixth semester is an applied project or co-operative field placement in partnership with business, industry, a law enforcement agency, or government department. \n

Why Choose Fleming \n

Fleming has a well-known track record of producing talented graduates in both the Applied Computing and Engineering Science, and the Law and Justice fields. As such, you will acquire the best we have to offer—in a new, winning combination that will put you on the road to success as an in-demand computer security specialist. \n

There are no other programs like this in Ontario. The program will provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for industry certification in both the computer forensics and networking disciplines. As you progress through the program you will gain the skills required to become industry certified in a number of areas, including: \n

  • CCNA \u2013 Cisco Certified Network Architect \n
  • CCE \u2013 Certified Computer Examiner \n
  • Security+ \n
  • Network+ \n
  • A+ \n
  • Linux+ \n
  • MCSE \u2013 Microsoft Certified System Engineer \n
  • CISSP \u2013 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (student level qualification) \n
  • CEH — Certified Ethical Hacker \n
  • EnCE — Encase Certified Examiner \n

With your diploma, and these top certifications, you will demonstrate your abilities and value to the industry, gaining you the employment advantage. \n

Work Experience \n

In your final semester, you will work on an intensive team project or co-operative field placement. Each student will contribute specialized knowledge, learned in his or her program of study, to the solution of a real world technological problem posed by a sponsoring business or organization. Recent projects include: \n

  • Co-operative placements within financial and forensic firms, working real cases \n
  • Co-operative placements within corporate security departments and information security service providers \n
  • Security and penetration testing of a large Internet Service Provider \n
  • Forensic analysis and creation of standards for a security corporation \n
  • Development of a Linux based Darknet and Intrusion Detection system for a professional penetration testing company \n
  • Development and field deployment of a computer network Intrusion Detection System for a managed security service company to support large commercial clients \n

This applied project or co-operative field placement will enhance problem-solving skills, applied industry knowledge, and the ability to work as part of a team. You’ll also learn critical workplace skills such as time management, how to map a critical path, and presentation skills. Since you may be working on sophisticated developmental or research based work, sponsors will often use the project as a testing ground and recruitment opportunity. \n

Is this You? \n

  • excellent oral and written communication skills \n
  • good problem solving skills \n
  • creative and analytical thinking skills \n
  • previous computing experience \n
  • able to keep a cool head in a crisis \n
  • research and investigative skills and interest \n
  • desire to learn and be challenged \n
  • strong time management skills \n

Career Opportunities \n

Career opportunities are available in both public and private sector organizations. Job titles include: \n

  • Information Technology Security Analyst \n
  • Information Security Administrator \n
  • Computer Security Consultant \n
  • Investigator \n
  • Network Security Specialist \n
  • Computer Forensics Examiner \n
  • Digital Investigative Specialist \n

Starting salaries for many positions are $40,000 to $60,000. Industry surveys identify that IT security professionals, with the security skills you will acquire, consistently earn higher income than others in the industry. \n

Minimum Admission Requirements \n

OSSD with the majority of credits at the College (C) and Open (O) level, including: \n

  • 2 College (C) English courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12) \n
  • 2 College (C) Math courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12) \n

When (C) is the minimum course level for admission, (U) or (U\/C) courses are also accepted. \n

Mature Students \n

If you are 19 years of age or older before classes start, and you do not possess an OSSD, you can write the Canadian Adult Achievement Test to assess your eligibility for admission. Additional testing or academic upgrading may be necessary to meet specific course requirements for this program. \n

\n Advanced Standing \n

Do you have another college diploma, or have you completed other technology courses at another college or university? You may be eligible for advanced standing entry to the Computer Security and Investigations program. With this fast track option, you can quickly complete the program and become qualified to enter the field of computer security. Contact the program coordinator to find out how you can take advantage of this opportunity. \n

Transfer Agreements \n\nUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology\n»,»description_short»:»The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to prov >

Program Description

The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology.

Program Highlights

The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology. Your classes are regularly reviewed and improved to be the most current subjects demanded by the industry, such as:

  • Advanced Ethical Hacking
  • Threat and Risk Analysis
  • Information Security
  • Advanced Computer Forensics
  • Internet and Hacking Investigations
  • CISCO Network Design and Management
  • Network Security
  • Criminology
  • Justice Studies

In addition to these cutting edge subjects, you will also learn how to develop systems, procedures, and human resources to manage the risks associated with information technology — and be capable of providing technical assistance to prevent, investigate, and protect individuals and organizations from cyber-crime. Your studies will be from a security management and law enforcement perspective, with emphasis placed on both the technological and management skills required to implement information technology security, and the investigative skills necessary to respond appropriately to breaches of security.

You will have the added benefit of courses in law, justice, and criminology, taking advantage of Fleming College’s reputation and experience in these fields, in addition to obtaining the technical training you need to function as a technological consultant. In this three-year program, the final sixth semester is an applied project or co-operative field placement in partnership with business, industry, a law enforcement agency, or government department.

Why Choose Fleming

Fleming has a well-known track record of producing talented graduates in both the Applied Computing and Engineering Science, and the Law and Justice fields. As such, you will acquire the best we have to offer—in a new, winning combination that will put you on the road to success as an in-demand computer security specialist.

There are no other programs like this in Ontario. The program will provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for industry certification in both the computer forensics and networking disciplines. As you progress through the program you will gain the skills required to become industry certified in a number of areas, including:

  • CCNA – Cisco Certified Network Architect
  • CCE – Certified Computer Examiner
  • Security+
  • Network+
  • A+
  • Linux+
  • MCSE – Microsoft Certified System Engineer
  • CISSP – Certified Information Systems Security Professional (student level qualification)
  • CEH — Certified Ethical Hacker
  • EnCE — Encase Certified Examiner

With your diploma, and these top certifications, you will demonstrate your abilities and value to the industry, gaining you the employment advantage.

Work Experience


In your final semester, you will work on an intensive team project or co-operative field placement. Each student will contribute specialized knowledge, learned in his or her program of study, to the solution of a real world technological problem posed by a sponsoring business or organization. Recent projects include:

  • Co-operative placements within financial and forensic firms, working real cases
  • Co-operative placements within corporate security departments and information security service providers
  • Security and penetration testing of a large Internet Service Provider
  • Forensic analysis and creation of standards for a security corporation
  • Development of a Linux based Darknet and Intrusion Detection system for a professional penetration testing company
  • Development and field deployment of a computer network Intrusion Detection System for a managed security service company to support large commercial clients

This applied project or co-operative field placement will enhance problem-solving skills, applied industry knowledge, and the ability to work as part of a team. You’ll also learn critical workplace skills such as time management, how to map a critical path, and presentation skills. Since you may be working on sophisticated developmental or research based work, sponsors will often use the project as a testing ground and recruitment opportunity.

Is this You?

  • excellent oral and written communication skills
  • good problem solving skills
  • creative and analytical thinking skills
  • previous computing experience
  • able to keep a cool head in a crisis
  • research and investigative skills and interest
  • desire to learn and be challenged
  • strong time management skills

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities are available in both public and private sector organizations. Job titles include:

  • Information Technology Security Analyst
  • Information Security Administrator
  • Computer Security Consultant
  • Investigator
  • Network Security Specialist
  • Computer Forensics Examiner
  • Digital Investigative Specialist

Starting salaries for many positions are $40,000 to $60,000. Industry surveys identify that IT security professionals, with the security skills you will acquire, consistently earn higher income than others in the industry.

Minimum Admission Requirements

OSSD with the majority of credits at the College (C) and Open (O) level, including:

  • 2 College (C) English courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12)
  • 2 College (C) Math courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12)

When (C) is the minimum course level for admission, (U) or (U/C) courses are also accepted.

Mature Students

If you are 19 years of age or older before classes start, and you do not possess an OSSD, you can write the Canadian Adult Achievement Test to assess your eligibility for admission. Additional testing or academic upgrading may be necessary to meet specific course requirements for this program.

Advanced Standing

Do you have another college diploma, or have you completed other technology courses at another college or university? You may be eligible for advanced standing entry to the Computer Security and Investigations program. With this fast track option, you can quickly complete the program and become qualified to enter the field of computer security. Contact the program coordinator to find out how you can take advantage of this opportunity.

Transfer Agreements

University of Ontario Institute of Technology

Protection, Security and Investigation Канада

(Formerly Law & Security Administration)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
OSSD with the majority of courses at the College (C), University (U), University/College (M) or Open (O) level plus:

  • Grade 12 English — ENG4U, ENG4C, EAE4C or EAE4U

Mature students — See Admission Procedures for details.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW
This program provides general training for work in the various areas of private security, Canadian Border Services, Immigration, federal and provincial correctional services, by-law enforcement, Ministry of Transportation Enforcement Officers, Military Policing as well as other areas of policing.

This program will appeal to students who are self-disciplined, with a high moral character. They must have good written and oral communication skills and the ability to analyze and apply legal principles. Students must also be willing to work in diverse communities and have good health and fitness.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Job opportunities are very good and continue to grow with security related positions increasing in the gaming industry and in the corporate and retail sector. Entry-level positions are also available in corrections, customs operations, private investigation, bylaw enforcement and the armed forces .

HEALTH REQUIREMENTS
Students will be required to complete 2 physical fitness courses (PFP108-Lifestyle & Management I and PFP208 — Lifestyle & Management II) which require the applicant to assess their ability to participate.

CRITERIA
Because all law enforcement agencies have designated hiring criteria (that may include physical and medical restrictions) prospective students are expected to investigate the specific qualifications to determine their eligibility for potential employment. Students should be aware that persons with a criminal record might be precluded from employment within these areas.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • Program Physical Demands Analysis: B803

YOUR INVESTMENT
The standard tuition and compulsory fees for the current academic year :

For programs with Experiential Learning (Work Placement/Internship): Costs for accommodation, if needed, travel and related expenses is at the student’s own expense. It is recommended for most programs, that students have access to a laptop or desktop computer while away from home during experiential learning periods.


Textbooks and other materials are in addition to Tuition Fees. Textbook prices may be found through the Bookstore website.

Please be aware that tuition and compulsory fees are subject to adjustment each year. The College reserves the right to change, amend or alter fees as necessary without notice or prejudice.

National Cyber Security Strategy
Canada’s Vision for Security and Prosperity in the Digital Age

Table of contents

Foreword

Virtually everything Canadians do is touched by technology in some way – on a per capita basis, we spend the most time online of any country in the world, at 43.5 hours per Canadian per month. We are heavily inter-connected and networked, a fact that enhances our quality of life, but also creates vulnerabilities. From commercial supply chains to the critical infrastructure that underpins our economy and our society, the risks in the cyber world have multiplied, accelerated, and grown increasingly malicious.

Major corporations, industries and our international allies and partners are engaged in the global cyber challenge. But many others are not — representing a significant risk, but also a missed opportunity in this rapidly growing global industry. While it is important to be keenly aware of cyber threats, Canada’s cyber security policy cannot be driven by fear and defensiveness.

With this in mind, the renewal of the existing Cyber Security Strategy has been undertaken with an emphasis on the enormous potential of Canada’s increased leadership in this field. In partnership with the Ministers of Defence, Innovation, Infrastructure, Public Services and the Treasury Board, we consulted directly with Canadians and key stakeholders about how the new strategy could best serve their security needs, while allowing them to benefit from the opportunities that the digital economy offers. Informed by over 2,000 submissions to our public consultation, the Strategy directly addresses the gaps and areas for improvement in Canada’s current cyber security climate.

The Strategy’s core goals are reflected in Budget 2020’s substantial investments in cyber security – totaling more than $500 million dollars over five years. As the largest single investment in cyber security ever made by the Canadian government, Budget 2020 demonstrates our commitment to safety and security in the digital age.

Among the new measures introduced:

  • Funding for the new Canadian Centre for Cyber Security to support leadership and collaboration between different levels of government and international partners, while providing a clear and trusted resource for Canadian citizens and businesses.
  • The creation of the National Cybercrime Coordination Unit to expand the RCMP’s capacity to investigate cybercrime, establishing a coordination hub for both domestic and international partners.
  • Funding to foster innovation and economic growth, and the development of Canadian cyber talent.

The Strategy is the roadmap for Canada’s path forward on cyber security, and is designed to meet the objectives and priorities of Canadians. We are proud to be leading the way.

The Honourable Ralph Goodale
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

Executive Summary

Canada’s Place in a Digital World

Our world has been transformed by digital innovation.

Digital technologies are now an integral part of our daily lives, with new developments emerging every day. From running our businesses, accessing government services, to interacting with our friends and families, these technologies connect Canadians from coast to coast to coast while linking us into a dynamic global network.

This is just the beginning. There is endless potential for new and revolutionary ideas. We will continue to see digital innovation pushed to new heights — to the benefit of our communities, our societies, and our planet.

The Importance of Cyber Security

As we embrace digital technologies for their tremendous benefits, we can open ourselves up to threats.

Criminals and other malicious cyber threat actors — many of which operate outside our borders — take advantage of security gaps, low cyber security awareness, and technological developments in an effort to compromise cyber systems. They steal personal and financial information, intellectual property, and trade secrets. They disrupt and sometimes destroy the infrastructure that we rely on for essential services and our way of life.

In 2010, the Government of Canada launched a national effort to defend against these threats with Canada’s first Cyber Security Strategy. The progress made and accomplishments achieved under the 2010 Strategy are the basis for future action.

Our new approach reflects the extent to which digital technologies have become essential to our way of life. With a new Cyber Security Strategy, we can proceed with confidence in our digital age. In this reality, cyber security is the companion to innovation and the protector of prosperity.

The Vision of the National Cyber Security Strategy: Security and prosperity in the digital age

Strong cyber security is an essential element of Canadian innovation and prosperity. Individuals, governments, and businesses all want to have confidence in the cyber systems that underpin their daily lives. The Government of Canada envisions a future in which all Canadians play an active role in shaping and sustaining our nation’s cyber resilience.

To realize our vision, the Government of Canada and its partners will work together across three themes:

Security and Resilience

Through collaborative action with partners and enhanced cyber security capabilities, we will better protect Canadians from cybercrime, respond to evolving threats, and defend critical government and private sector systems.

Cyber Innovation

By supporting advanced research, fostering digital innovation, and developing cyber skills and knowledge, the federal government will position Canada as a global leader in cyber security.

Leadership and Collaboration

The federal government, in close collaboration with provinces, territories, and the private sector, will take a leadership role to advance cyber security in Canada and will, in coordination with allies, work to shape the international cyber security environment in Canada’s favour.

In a dynamic cyber security environment, the Government of Canada’s approach will be rooted in a sustained commitment to:

  • Protect the safety and security of Canadians and our critical infrastructure
  • Promote and protect rights and freedoms online
  • Encourage cyber security for business, economic growth, and prosperity
  • Collaborate and support coordination across jurisdictions and sectors to strengthen Canada’s cyber resilience
  • Proactively adapt to changes in the cyber security landscape and the emergence of new technology

Scope of the Strategy

The scope of this Strategy starts with the work that the Government of Canada is already undertaking. This includes ongoing and future efforts to protect Government of Canada systems, to extend our network of partnerships to help protect critical infrastructure, and to help Canadians to be safe online. In a more diverse and dynamic global cyber security landscape, however, Canada’s new approach will be more extensive and inclusive. This document outlines the key elements of the global cyber security environment and articulates some of the ways that the Government of Canada will respond to an array of new challenges and opportunities in cyberspace.

Implementing the Strategy

Recognizing that the pace of change we see today will only accelerate, this Strategy is designed as the mainstay of the Government’s continuous efforts to enhance cyber security in Canada. The Government’s actions will evolve alongside the ground-breaking technological developments and resulting paradigm shifts that have become common in our connected world.

Cyber security action plans will supplement this Strategy. These will detail the specific initiatives that the federal government will undertake over time, with clear performance metrics and a commitment to report on results achieved. They will also outline the Government’s plan for working with internal and external partners to achieve its vision.

The implementation of this Strategy will align with other cyber-related Government of Canada initiatives. These include: the Minister of Democratic Institutions’ mandate to defend the electoral process from cyber threats; cyber foreign policy in Canada’s international agenda; the Canadian military’s use of cyber; and the Innovation and Skills Plan.

The Government of Canada’s first Cyber Security Strategy allocated $431.5 million over ten years, with three pillars of action and wide-ranging accomplishments:

I. Securing Government systems

The Government of Canada increased its capacity to prevent, detect, respond to, and recover from cyber attacks. The number of data breaches has steadily declined since 2010 — despite an increase in the number and sophistication of state-sponsored and non-state cyber activities against Government networks.


II. Partnering to secure vital cyber systems outside the federal government

Partnerships were forged with owners and operators of Canada’s critical infrastructure, the private sector, and provincial and territorial governments. The Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) expanded its operations, with over 1300 organizations receiving regular alerts and communications.

III. Helping Canadians to be secure online

Through the Get Cyber Safe campaign, the Government of Canada supported cyber security awareness with outreach, activities, and development of targeted resources. Efforts made under the 2010 Strategy also improved the capacity of the RCMP and law enforcement agencies to combat cybercrime, including initial investments in cybercrime intelligence, investigations, and training.

Introduction

Building on Canada’s Accomplishments in a Dynamic Cyber Landscape

Cyber Security Snapshot
The Benefits of Backing Up

Jacqueline is a small business owner who sells crafts through an online store. One day, Jacqueline receives an email from a customer who is complaining about a broken piece. The customer attaches a picture of the product, but when Jacqueline opens the attachment she finds that she is locked out of her computer. A message appears indicating that her computer will only be unlocked if she pays a ransom of $1,000 to the perpetrator. Fortunately, Jacqueline regularly backs up her computer. She wipes her hard drive, eliminating the malware that was delivered through the email attachment and restores the backup, which allows her to access all her documents.

What is Cyber Security?

Cyber security is the protection of digital information and the infrastructure on which it resides.

Cyber security was once the domain of technical experts, but now, in our digital world, we all have a role to play in our individual and collective cyber security.

From the Margins to the Mainstream

The degree to which digital technology is now integrated into our daily lives would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. From social media, smartphone applications, online shopping, networked devices, the cloud, and beyond, we rely on digital technologies for more than personal enjoyment — they are integral to the systems that underpin our economy and our way of life. These interdependent systems include the communications networks that connect across the country and around the world, energy to heat our homes and power our industry, and air, train, and road travel we use every day.

We tend to take this connectivity for granted, without pausing to reflect on its implications. Cyber security cannot be taken for granted. As the benefits and opportunities of technologies continue to grow, it is increasingly crucial to secure these technologies.

Taking Stock of a Changing Landscape

In 2020, the Government of Canada took the first step toward developing a new Cyber Security Strategy. The Cyber Review was launched to understand the cyber security implications of being a connected nation, and to position the Government of Canada to establish a new approach that reflects the challenges and opportunities we face.

The Cyber Review sought to take stock of the evolving threats in cyberspace, to understand and explore the ways that cyber security is becoming a driver of economic prosperity, and to determine the appropriate federal role in this digital age. The Cyber Review included in-depth engagement within the federal government cyber security community, an evaluation of our performance under the 2010 Strategy, as well as Canada’s first public consultation on cyber security. The Government of Canada obtained insights and advice from experts, key stakeholders, and engaged citizens.

Cyber Security Snapshot
Password Smarts

Christine loves the convenience of the cloud. She created one central account online that manages everything from her computer, her smartphone, her fitness tracker, and even her home security system. Through the cloud, her email and social media accounts are linked, her photos and videos are uploaded automatically, and any updates to her calendar appear across all her devices. Christine always uses the same password so that it’s easy for her to remember. When she hears about a data breach affecting her email account, she realizes that someone could use her email password to access her cloud account. Concerned about protecting her privacy and her information, Christine creates a new, strong password, which she varies slightly for other online services.

Our Response

This new Cyber Security Strategy reflects the perspectives from the Cyber Review. It also recognizes that while cyber threats are growing in sophistication and magnitude, there is enormous potential for Canadian digital innovation and expertise in cyber security. It is designed to be adaptable and to account for a continuously changing cyber landscape.

Our National Cyber Security Strategy establishes three goals in response to evolving threats, emerging opportunities, and the need for collaborative action:

  • Secure and Resilient Canadian Systems
  • An Innovative and Adaptive Cyber Ecosystem
  • Effective Leadership and Collaboration

The federal government will lead the effort to achieve these goals in an era when cyber security is not just a necessity, but a competitive advantage for Canada.

The input received through the Cyber Review was comprehensive, sophisticated, and insightful. Responses came from the federal government cyber community, cyber security experts, business leaders, government officials, law enforcement, academics, and engaged citizens.

The Cyber Review revealed three main trends:

There is support for law enforcement’s efforts to address cybercrime while protecting privacy in cyberspace

  • There is recognition that cyber security serves to protect personal information — and by extension, privacy. Canadians support efforts to safeguard their privacy online.
  • Canadians acknowledge that law enforcement faces challenges addressing cybercrime, and are concerned by the rising threat of cybercrime for individuals, private and public sector organizations, and governments.

There is a wide ranging need for improved cyber security knowledge and skills

  • Better cyber security knowledge and skills are needed. This extends from our children to our elderly and from our small and medium business owners to our law enforcement agencies and corporate executives.
  • A shortage of cyber security talent makes it difficult for organizations — including the federal government — to attract and retain the people they need to improve their cyber security or to disrupt cyber threats.

There are calls for strong federal leadership on cyber security:

  • External partners want a reliable focal point of federal government leadership on cyber security.
  • Partners want consistent messaging, advice, guidance from the Government of Canada.
  • Organizations have asked for cyber security standards or legislation in Canada to clarify requirements and expectations to improve their cyber security.
  • Stakeholders want to see federal leadership in cyber security to foster national collaboration, drive investment, facilitate information sharing and safeguard rights and freedoms.

Security and Resilience

Strategic Context: The Evolution of the Cyber Threat

The threats we face in cyberspace are complex and rapidly evolving. Governments, businesses, organizations, and Canadians are vulnerable. With more of our economy and essential services moving online every year, the stakes could not be higher.

Cybercrime and Advanced Cyber Threats

Perpetrators of malicious cyber activity are extremely diverse, with varying aims and a wide array of techniques. Malicious cyber actors include individual hackers and insider threats, criminal networks, nation states, terrorist organizations, and state-sponsored actors. Sophisticated cyber attacks are often technically challenging to understand, with significant expertise required to do so.

Any organization or individual can be a victim of malicious cyber activity. Victims may be individually targeted or part of a campaign affecting millions of internet users. As Canadians put more information online, they become increasingly attractive targets for malicious cyber actors. Canadian law enforcement agencies’ ability to protect Canadians from these actors, who may be anywhere in the world, is a growing challenge.

Malicious cyber activity is often conducted for monetary gain. For example, phishing emails that appear to come from financial institutions can deceive people into providing their banking information. Ransomware can be deployed to encrypt files on a device or system, with a hacker demanding payment to restore access. Data breaches can result in personal and financial information (such as social insurance numbers, credit card information) being stolen from organizations’ online databases and subsequently sold in criminal marketplaces for activities like fraud, identity theft, or extortion.

Malicious cyber actors can also be motivated by a specific cause — sometimes called “hacktivists” — such as exposing wrongdoing, protesting, or provoking embarrassment. They can also be enthusiasts, attempting to demonstrate their skill at hacking and to gain notoriety.


On a larger scale, nation states and state-sponsored actors have the capability to steal our intellectual property or confidential business strategies to give their own economies a competitive advantage.

Some nation states are also developing advanced cyber tools with hostile aims. There are risks to Canada’s national security and public safety if the threat is to the computer systems that underpin government systems, critical infrastructure, and democratic institutions. Terrorist organizations are also interested in acquiring advanced cyber tools to conduct attacks.

Cyber Security Snapshot
Email Scams

It’s tax season and Mohsen recently filed his taxes online. A few days later, he receives an email from someone claiming to be a tax official, informing him that there is information missing from his file. The official makes an urgent request for additional personal information to complete his file, including his address and social insurance number. The email notes that failure to provide this information could lead to steep penalties and even jail time. Mohsen feels suspicious about the email, and so before providing the information, he checks the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) website. He reads that the CRA would never send emails asking individuals to divulge personal or financial information. He follows the CRA’s advice by ignoring the email.

The Growing Impact

As malicious cyber tools become increasingly accessible and as rates of cybercrime continue to rise, there is a real threat to Canada’s economic well-being. Furthermore, as more of Canada’s critical infrastructure can be controlled remotely and essential services are managed online, cyber incidents have the potential to compromise national security and public safety.

From a financial perspective, victims of cyber compromise face immediate costs to recover and restore their systems. They also face long-term costs to replace or upgrade cyber systems, as well as untold reputational costs. While start-ups are particularly vulnerable, the loss of intellectual property has contributed to financial ruin for businesses of all sizes.

Cyber incidents can also be profoundly destabilizing. They can erode trust in e-commerce and government institutions and can lead people to question their continued use of digital technologies if they feel that their safety or privacy is at risk.

The internet-of-things (IoT) refers to objects and devices that are connected to the internet to communicate with one another and provide more efficient and customized services. The IoT is growing rapidly, with over 25 billion connected devices expected by 2020.

Connecting devices to the internet opens the door to new cyber security risks. Cyber security gaps can be exploited to disrupt services through distributed denial of service (DDoS) campaigns or to gain entry to wider systems or private data. In October 2020, millions of unsecured devices were used to overwhelm the servers of Dyn, an internet infrastructure company, which then took popular websites and online services offline internationally.

Cyber Security Snapshot
Resilience Through Information Sharing

Beom-Jun works in the IT Department for a large financial institution. He has noticed that there have been a lot of attempts to hack into the system. While they have been unsuccessful, he decides to send the technical information to the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) for their analysis. He knows that CCIRC relies on critical infrastructure organizations, like his bank, to report cyber incidents so that they can notify other sectors and international partners of trends and threats. He appreciates that by working together, they are increasing the cyber security of the organizations that Canadians rely on.

As digital innovation is pushed further and as new technologies are developed, the nature of cyber threats will constantly change. For instance, internet-connected technologies are increasingly popular, from thermostats and healthcare devices like pacemakers to cars and the systems that run our critical infrastructure and services. Without adequate cyber security, connected devices are vulnerable to being hacked on an unprecedented scale. Similarly, many Canadians rely on encryption to secure their online communications and data. The arrival of quantum computing will undercut the security of traditional encryption, requiring that Canadians have quantum-resistant solutions at their disposal. A forward-looking and flexible cyber security posture will be necessary to keep pace with these changes.

Public Consultation on Cyber Security

What We Heard

“The #1 cyber challenge for Canada is that there are an increasing number of incidents that are causing harm to the economy and society, ranging from breaches, crimes, disruption of essential services, and destruction of corporate and country assets”

“Privacy and security are not a zero-sum game and we can have both. There is no security without privacy. And liberty requires both security and privacy”

“Canadian law enforcement should centralize their cybercrime resources… A single window centre will make it easier for businesses to know who to call when their systems have been compromised, and will help law enforcement investigate and respond to cybercrime across jurisdictions”

Secure and Resilient Canadian Systems

Through collaborative action with partners and enhanced cyber security capabilities, we will better protect Canadians from cybercrime, respond to evolving threats, and defend critical government and private sector systems.

The Government of Canada will maintain and improve cyber security across all federal departments and agencies to protect the privacy of Canadians’ information held by the federal government and the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of critical services for Canadians.

The Government of Canada will enhance law enforcement capacity to respond to cybercrime. It will support coordination across law enforcement agencies and with federal, provincial, territorial, and international partners. The Government will enhance cybercrime investigative capacity and make it easier for Canadians to report cybercrime.

Small and medium organizations often lack the knowledge and resources to implement cyber security regimes, even if doing so would offer a competitive advantage. The Government of Canada will help support these organizations — making cyber security more accessible.

In response to cyber threats of increasing sophistication, the Government of Canada will consider how its advanced cyber capabilities could be applied to defend critical networks in Canada and deter foreign cyber threat actors.

Some cyber systems — such as electricity grids, communications networks, or financial institutions — are so important that any disruption could have serious consequences for public safety and national security. The federal government will work with provinces, territories, and the private sector to help define requirements to protect this digital infrastructure.

Cyber Innovation

Cyber Security Snapshot
Skills for the Digital Age

Marc is looking for possible summer camps for his daughters. He wants to find something that allows them to try something different while developing new skills. In his search, he comes across a summer program designed to help children develop basic coding skills, which would give them the tools they need to build websites and develop their own programs. With Marc’s encouragement they register for the camp, opening the door to a new hobby and an exciting skillset.

Strategic Context: Expanding Frontiers of Cyber Security

Digital innovation has become the engine of economic growth in the 21st century. Cyber security is not only essential for protecting the sources of Canada’s digital innovation — it has become a source of innovation in its own right.

New Horizons of Technology and Business Development

Cyber security is increasingly driving innovation and economic activity in Canada. It already contributes $1.7 billion to Canada’s GDP and consists of over 11,000 well-paying jobs Note 1 . With the global cyber security industry forecasted to grow by 66% by 2021, thousands of additional jobs could be created for Canadians in the years ahead Note 2 . Governments, academia, and members of the private sector can work together to create new opportunities, drive investment, and foster leading-edge research and development.

Canada is already a leader in cyber security research and development. Breakthroughs in cyber security research are not only beneficial for Canadian cyber security firms, but for the economy as a whole. Government has a role to play to support advanced research and to help innovative companies scale up to bring cyber security technologies and services to the global marketplace.

Building on the Benefits of Digital Technology

Canada’s participation in digital life has generated immense prosperity and benefits, and has opened a new gateway to the world. Governments, businesses and other organizations play a central role in protecting these benefits by establishing strong security for their online platforms, products, and services.

Cyber security is only as strong as its weakest link. Small and medium enterprises — and indeed many organizations in Canada — face similar challenges securing their systems and networks as their much larger counterparts, but must do so with less expertise and fewer resources. Governments can help correct this asymmetry by providing advice and guidance and enhancing access to cyber security information and tools. This helps Canadian organizations in both public and private sectors to successfully adopt digital technologies.

Individual knowledge goes a long way in cyber security, from digital literacy all the way to coding and threat mitigation skills. Initiatives in Canadian communities, schools, and post-secondary institutions help to equip Canadians with skills for the digital age. The Government of Canada is playing its part through long-term investments to help Canadians of all backgrounds to get the education and work experience they need to participate in an increasingly digital economy.

Quantum science and technology allows information to be processed and secured much more rapidly and more securely. Quantum devices could have revolutionary benefits across a range of fields, such as helping to understand how diseases develop or optimizing medical treatments. While quantum can secure information and push technology to new limits, its use may also threaten many forms of encryption used today to protect systems and applications in Canada and around the world.

Recognizing the opportunities and challenges of quantum computing, Canadian efforts have established a strong base of expertise and leadership in quantum computing, like that seen at the Institute of Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo.

Advancing 21st Century Skills and Knowledge

The demand for qualified cyber security professionals is surging. A global shortage of qualified professionals represents an immediate and growing opportunity for Canada’s highly educated workforce. We can encourage more students to move into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. We can encourage graduates from both STEM programs and other disciplines (such as psychology, sociology, or management) to specialize in the skills needed for cyber security jobs. Attracting this multidisciplinary talent, both domestically and from abroad, is essential for Canadian governments and businesses. It also helps to ensure that Canadian companies are able to safely grow and innovate as they expand their use of digital technology.

As the cyber security environment continues to evolve, there is a constant need for reliable and up-to-date information. Canadian statistics and research in the area of cyber security will provide a more accurate view of the cyber issues our nation faces in a global context. This information can be used by academics, researchers, and policy makers to understand trends, manage risk, inform future investments, and adjust course when appropriate.

Public Consultation on Cyber Security

What We Heard

“We must work to ensure that start-ups and innovation born in Canada stay in Canada”

“The federal government can play a unique role in ensuring businesses see Canada as a location where they can thrive in a cyber safe environment”

“Few appreciate the strategic relevance of cyber security intelligence. You can’t manage what you don’t measure”

An Innovative and Adaptive Cyber Ecosystem

By supporting advanced research, fostering digital innovation, and developing cyber skills and knowledge, the federal government will position Canada as a global leader in cyber security.

The Government of Canada will work with partners to drive investment and foster cyber research and development. The Government will focus on emerging areas of Canadian excellence, such as quantum computing and blockchain technologies. The federal government is already making progress in this regard, with Budget 2020 announcing the creation of a Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy for research and talent.

Together, we will explore initiatives to ensure that Canadian companies can bring their products to a global market. The Government will explore initiatives to drive domestic demand for cyber security technologies and services.

The Government of Canada will explore new ideas for making businesses and Canadians of all ages and backgrounds more cyber secure. The federal government has already committed investments to improve digital skills, such as coding education for kids.

Working together across governments, academia, and the private sector is necessary to address the cyber skills gap. Taking action now will allow us to build the labour force of the future, one that will help to support Canadian cyber security and that will contribute to Canada’s future prosperity.

The quality of information at our disposal shapes our ability to understand cyber trends. The federal government will support Canadian research and statistics efforts to improve our collective understanding of cyber threats and opportunities.

Leadership and Collaboration

Cyber Security Snapshot
Streamlining Service Delivery

Stuart was relieved when he found out that he could access his Canada Pension Plan (CPP) account online without having to remember another password. All he has to do is go to the CPP log-in page, click on the logo for his bank, and enter his information. He uses the same username and password as he does for his online banking, since his bank is a sign-in partner for the Government of Canada’s online services. He really likes the convenience, and since he trusts his bank’s security measures, he knows his information is protected. As his son David keeps telling him, his banking information will be safer as long as he uses a secure Wi-Fi — like his password-protected network at home. Apparently, hackers can intercept traffic over unsecured Wi-Fi, like in a coffee shop or airport.

Strategic Context: Collaborating to Realize the Benefits of Digital Life

Advances in technology benefit our communities and our societies. They contribute to our quality of life today, and will be instrumental in meeting the challenges of tomorrow. We all have a responsibility to secure these technologies. Through our National Cyber Security Strategy, the Government of Canada will advance the ways in which we work together to do so.

Raising Baseline Cyber Security in Canada

The vast majority of Canada’s digital systems are owned by individuals and organizations outside of the federal government. From individuals that use few technologies to tech-savvy businesses that are firmly rooted in the online world, many do not realize that they could be the target of cyber threats. As a result, they do not have measures in place to protect themselves and recover from cyber incidents. Even those that recognize the importance of securing their information may find it hard to identify affordable and effective measures to protect themselves.

The Government of Canada is taking on a leadership role in cyber security to help organizations and Canadians recognize the value of cyber security and to support efforts to raise the baseline of cyber security in Canada. It will complement these domestic efforts by working with international partners and allies, seeking to reduce the threat to Canada from cybercriminals and also from state actors and their proxies that may seek to harm us.

Moreover, the federal government is aiming for national cyber security excellence. Reaching this target will involve enhancing and growing cyber security capabilities in government and industry. It will entail supporting Canada’s leading edge research and development, as well as the range of organizations and businesses that do not have strong cyber security measures in place. Private sector leaders will have a central role to play, as a collaborative effort is needed to ensure that all Canadians are as equipped as possible to prevent and respond to cyber threats.

Blockchain technology allows for the creation of online ledgers or records. Often associated with virtual currencies, there are many possible applications of blockchain. It could be used to provide public services like issuing passports, creating records of contracts or legal documents, and processing payments for services rendered. The technology improves efficiency by reducing processing time for activities and reduces the risk of fraud and compromise, as no one party can modify, delete or append any records.

The Government of Canada recognizes the potential of blockchain for secure service delivery and for wider economic and societal benefits. Ensuring the smart application of blockchain technologies in Canada will require a collaborative approach and a collective effort.

Federal Cyber Security Leadership in a Dynamic Environment

The Government of Canada is in a unique position to play a leadership role in cyber security. This stems from extensive relationships with private and public sectors, a history of working with provinces, territories, and international officials on a range of cyber security issues, and advanced cyber security expertise and capabilities.

Federal leadership in cyber security was established through the 2010 Strategy and the nation-wide initiatives it introduced. In today’s cyber security environment, however, the federal government must deepen collaboration with partners to strengthen Canada’s cyber security. Concerted and integrated action by all parties is needed to build cyber resilience in Canada.

Establishing a clear focal point for cyber security within the federal government is one of the ways that the Government will demonstrate leadership while also enhancing its capacity to collaborate with partners. The Government will ensure that partners receive unified advice and guidance on cyber security and that they know where to go for assistance.

Smart cities use digital technologies to enhance quality of life by making services more efficient, cost-effective, and responsive for urban residents. For example, “smart” traffic lights will measure and adapt timing to improve traffic flows and connected sewer systems will detect leaks and monitor real-time water flow.

To accelerate the development of smart cities in Canada, the federal government announced the Smart Cities Challenge initiative in Budget 2020.

The federal government will make smart investments in cyber security, while also advocating for its partners in the private sector and in other jurisdictions to do the same. Private sector organizations in Canada have world-class cyber security capabilities that can be leveraged to benefit all sectors of the Canadian economy. There are also great ideas and strong leadership in our schools and our post-secondary institutions that will be instrumental in shaping the future of cyber security in Canada.

The Government will work to bridge Canada-wide efforts to develop cyber skills, advance new solutions, and strengthen cyber security. We will be an example to the world of what can be achieved through a cohesive and coherent National Cyber Security Strategy.

Public Consultation on Cyber Security

What We Heard

“The Government of Canada can provide much needed leadership by creating, adopting and modeling best practices for cyber security, and making efforts to transfer this knowledge to the private sector”

“[There is a] need for more centralized governance and strategic planning … for modern legislation and regulations, and leadership in identifying, prioritizing, endorsing and disseminating the latest international standards of cyber security technology”

“Collectively, we need to create an effective framework for cyber security governance, spanning principles, roles, and responsibilities within the government and across the public and private sectors”

Cyber Security Snapshot
Collaborating to Solve Cyber Security Problems

Augustine received an invitation to participate in the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre’s (CCIRC) annual Geek Week. He attended last year and enjoyed working with cyber professionals and academics from Canada and other countries to solve cyber security problems. Augustine found that the skills and professional connections he gained during Geek Week benefitted him when he returned to work. At last year’s event, his team experimented with CCIRC’s prototype tools to perform automated analysis of mobile-based malware and ransomware, and also examined how encryption on such devices can be exploited by attackers. He likes that the work they did can have a real-world benefit and that after the event the team was able to take the tool they worked on back to their own organizations to develop further.

Effective Leadership, Governance, and Collaboration

The federal government, in close collaboration with provinces, territories, and the private sector, will take a leadership role to advance cyber security in Canada and will, in coordination with allies, work to shape the international cyber security environment in Canada’s favour.

Responding to calls for decisive federal leadership, the Government of Canada will streamline the way it works and collaborates with external partners and stakeholders by establishing a clear focal point for authoritative advice, guidance, and cyber incident response. This approach will improve information sharing and make it easier for the private sector to obtain the support it needs.

The Government of Canada will reinvigorate public awareness and engagement efforts and establish new forums for collaboration. The federal government will work in consultation with a cross-section of Canadian stakeholders to ensure that we collectively enhance cyber security in Canada.

The federal government will lead, in partnership with provinces, territories, and the private sector, the development of a national plan to prevent, mitigate and respond to cyber incidents, one that ensures efficient coordination and effective action.

The Government of Canada will work with its international partners to advance Canadian interests. This includes advocating for an open, free, and secure internet and enhancing our international cooperation to combat cybercrime.

Workbook Glossary

Footnotes

International Data Corporation (IDC) Canada, «2020 Canadian ICT Predictions and Forecast: Digital Transformation and Disruption,» December 2015

Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC), «Critical Infrastructure in a Hyperconnected Economy,» August 2020.

Research and Markets, «Cyber Security Market – Global Forecast to 2021,» August 2020.

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