Public Transport Канада


Public Transportation

The Canada Line is Vancouver’s rapid transit rail connecting YVR to downtown Vancouver in under 30 minutes and to downtown Richmond in 18 minutes. You can access trains from both the International and Domestic Terminals.

Canada Line

Canada Line’s YVR Airport station is centrally located between our International and Domestic Terminals. As you exit the train, turn left for domestic flights or right for US and international flights.

Check the Canada Line website for the latest schedules, news and events.

Canada Line accessibility

The Canada Line is accessible by elevator from arrivals and departures levels. Ask one of our friendly Green Coat volunteers, located throughout the terminals, for help finding the Canada Line.

Getting to the Canada Line from YVR

Arriving from within Canada?

  • Your checked bags are at Arrivals on Level 2 of the Domestic Terminal
  • On Level 3, walk toward the Link Building (located between the International and Domestic Terminal)
  • Follow the signs marked Canada Line or ask any of our Customer Care staff in red or green vests for assistance

Arriving from outside Canada?

  • Once through the customs and immigration arrivals process, walk toward the exit to our International Arrivals Greeting Area
  • Exit the building following signs marked Canada Line
  • Before the parkade entrance, an escalator and elevator will take you up to the Canada Line platform

All transit users travelling on the Canada Line leaving YVR are subject to a $5 Canada Line YVR AddFare, in addition to the regular zone fare. AddFare is automatically added when a user purchases a fare card.

The Canada Line YVR AddFare is levied and collected by TransLink. The Airport Authority receives no portion of the money collected from the Canada Line YVR AddFare.


Transport Canada

Связанные темы

Направлено: Marc Garneau

Everybody deserves safe transportation. If you live in a large city in Canada, you’ve probably taken public transit at least once. For 12% people, it’s the primary mode of transportation to work, grocery shopping, doctors appointments, and the community — but public transit isn’t available everywhere. Many Canadian cities lack a reliable transit system, causing people to forego job opportunities, miss appointments, or hitchhike just to meet their needs. It’s 2020. There’s no excuse. Research is showing that younger generations rely on public transit more than those before, and this isn’t a new problem. Public transit has a lot of benefits whether you use it or not: Benefits communities financially (jobs are created, home values go up, and economy improves.) Public transportation reduces air pollution (less cars) Increased fuel efficiency (less gas per person) Reduced traffic congestion Saves money (Taking public transportation instead of owning a second vehicle can save (on average) more than $9,823 a year, and for those who ride instead of driving the primary vehicle, can save individuals a significant amount of money each month in avoided gas, maintenance, parking, and other expenses.) Increases mobility (For those who don’t, or can’t, drive, public transportation allows them to get to work, to school, to the grocery store or doctor’s office, or just to visit friends, without having to engage a friend or relative to do the driving) [Also, no hitchhiking!] Frees up time (if you aren’t driving, you can be studying or bonding with your kids!) Taking public transit is safer (less crime and less accidents. and did I mention less hitchhiking?) Encourages healthier habits (people who take public transit tend to get 3x the physical activity to their no transit or car driving counterparts.) We deserve a transit system that allows every Canadian to meet their needs safely.

Everybody deserves safe transportation. If you live in a large city in Canada, you’ve probably taken public transit at least once. For 12% people, it’s the primary mode of transportation to work, grocery shopping, doctors appointments, and the community — but public transit isn’t available everywhere. Many Canadian cities lack a reliable transit system, causing people to forego job opportunities, miss appointments, or hitchhike just to meet their needs. It’s 2020. There’s no excuse. Research is showing that younger generations rely on public transit more than those before, and this isn’t a new problem. Public transit has a lot of benefits whether you use it or not: Benefits communities financially (jobs are created, home values go up, and economy improves.) Public transportation reduces air pollution (less cars) Increased fuel efficiency (less gas per person) Reduced traffic congestion Saves money (Taking public transportation instead of owning a second vehicle can save (on average) more than $9,823 a year, and for those who ride instead of driving the primary vehicle, can save individuals a significant amount of money each month in avoided gas, maintenance, parking, and other expenses.) Increases mobility (For those who don’t, or can’t, drive, public transportation allows them to get to work, to school, to the grocery store or doctor’s office, or just to visit friends, without having to engage a friend or relative to do the driving) [Also, no hitchhiking!] Frees up time (if you aren’t driving, you can be studying or bonding with your kids!) Taking public transit is safer (less crime and less accidents. and did I mention less hitchhiking?) Encourages healthier habits (people who take public transit tend to get 3x the physical activity to their no transit or car driving counterparts.) We deserve a transit system that allows every Canadian to meet their needs safely.

Public transport Toronto to Waterloo

I will travel to Toronto and I will need to travel to Waterloo too (from Toronto).

  • Is there any student discount with my Hungarian student ID?

I tried to plan my trip and as I saw when I will travel to Waterloo from Toronto I will need to take the 25F bus. Is there any alternative?

As a student I don’t have much money so that’s why I would like to come out the cheapest but I don’t know how.

1 Answer 1

The public transit intercity situation in Ontario is very unlike Europe. Depending on whether you want to travel directly from the airport, or from downtown, you will have different options and I predict you will not like any of them.

There are many different providers: Go train to Kitchener, VIA train to Kitchener, Go bus (horrible slow tortuous route), Greyhound, even a Federation of Students bus at certain times of the day. Some leave from downtown, so if you’re arriving by plane you’ll need to take the UP express first to get to Union. Others leave from the airport, or from assorted suburban locations, some of which are served by the subway in Toronto. The University of Waterloo has a travel page with various links you may find useful. Since you mention 25, I guess you are considering the GO bus 25 and have looked into how to get to it from wherever you are arriving or where you will be when your business in Toronto is finished.

Go does offer discounts to post-secondary students (on Canadian public transit, the undecorated word «student» means primary and secondary school, ie before university) but only if they are attending Canadian institutions. Your Hungarian ID will not get you a discount.

Public Transportation

Subway lines operate regular service from around 6am (9am Sunday) until 1:30am daily. The two main lines are the crosstown Bloor–Danforth line, and the U-shaped Yonge–University–Spadina line. Stations are generally very safe and have Designated Waiting Areas (DWAs) monitored by security cameras.

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Streetcars are notoriously slow during rush hours, stopping frequently. The main routes run east–west along St Clair Ave and College, Dundas, Queen and King Sts. North–south streetcars grind along Bathurst St and Spadina Ave. TTC buses generally serve suburban areas. For more far-flung travel, the TTC system connects with GO Transit’s network to surrounding areas like Richmond Hill, Brampton and Hamilton.

What’s up with the TTC ?


What’s up with the TTC? Seriously. It’s the question on everyone’s lips, usually a few times a week. Love it or hate it, you have to use it and tens of thousands of people do, every day. Operated by the Toronto Transit Commission and known by locals as the TTC, Toronto’s antiquated subway, streetcar and bus system is adequate, at best. At worst, it seriously underdelivers services to a city continuing to expand more rapidly than its infrastructure. On a good day, you’ll get to where you need to in the expected time frame. On a bad day – usually in midsummer or the throes of winter – you might wish you had just stayed put.

Service delays and overcrowding are the most common complaints. Streetcars are clunky, packed to the hilt and move at a snail’s pace during the long rush hours, twice a day. Be sure to have the exact change as you board or ye shall not pass. Subway trains are better, with some fancy new rolling stock on the rails, but they are equally subject to delays. Of course, it’s very Canadian to make like a sardine or wait patiently in line and never complain: especially at staffed ticket booths where you’ll often see your train whizz past as you wait in line to get through. Attempts to automate ticketing with the PRESTO card (and electronic passes) are still in their infancy, with big plans to roll it out across the whole TTC network.

Public Transportation

The Canada Line is Vancouver’s rapid transit rail connecting YVR to downtown Vancouver in under 30 minutes and to downtown Richmond in 18 minutes. You can access trains from both the International and Domestic Terminals.

Canada Line

Canada Line’s YVR Airport station is centrally located between our International and Domestic Terminals. As you exit the train, turn left for domestic flights or right for US and international flights.

Check the Canada Line website for the latest schedules, news and events.

Canada Line accessibility

The Canada Line is accessible by elevator from arrivals and departures levels. Ask one of our friendly Green Coat volunteers, located throughout the terminals, for help finding the Canada Line.

Getting to the Canada Line from YVR

Arriving from within Canada?

  • Your checked bags are at Arrivals on Level 2 of the Domestic Terminal
  • On Level 3, walk toward the Link Building (located between the International and Domestic Terminal)
  • Follow the signs marked Canada Line or ask any of our Customer Care staff in red or green vests for assistance

Arriving from outside Canada?

  • Once through the customs and immigration arrivals process, walk toward the exit to our International Arrivals Greeting Area
  • Exit the building following signs marked Canada Line
  • Before the parkade entrance, an escalator and elevator will take you up to the Canada Line platform

All transit users travelling on the Canada Line leaving YVR are subject to a $5 Canada Line YVR AddFare, in addition to the regular zone fare. AddFare is automatically added when a user purchases a fare card.

The Canada Line YVR AddFare is levied and collected by TransLink. The Airport Authority receives no portion of the money collected from the Canada Line YVR AddFare.

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Transport and Driving in Canada

Despite its large geographic size, getting around Canada is not difficult. The country has well-established road networks and an extensive railway system, as well as a large number of domestic airports – all of which contribute towards making travelling within Canada straightforward for new arrivals.

Major Canadian cities such as Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver all have efficient public transport networks and dedicated bike paths.

Public transport in Canada

Canada offers various choices of public transport, including well-managed roads, railways, ferry networks and long-distance bus services connecting the largest cities.

Trains

The national passenger rail services in Canada are operated by Via Rail, whose trains link most major Canadian cities and many smaller communities.


There are different classes of service on trains in Canada, including economy class, business, sleeper, sleeper plus and touring. The overall quality of rail services is very high; the trains are neat and tidy, the seats are spacious and all classes of service include free WiFi.

Travelling by train costs more than a bus, but it’s more comfortable, and if travelling in a group, it is possible to get a special discount.

The busiest rail route is between Windsor, Ontario and Quebec City. There are lots of trains connecting Montreal with Toronto, as well as with Ottawa, Halifax and Quebec City. The longest train route in Canada connects Toronto and Vancouver, commemorating the original Canadian Pacific Railway. Moreover, there are rail tours through the Rocky Mountains provided by the Rocky Mountaineer and Royal Canadian Pacific lines.

Buses

Bus services in Canada are also very good. Buses are clean, comfortable, safe and reliable.

There are a number of service providers offering intercity bus transportation, with extensive networks across central and western Canada, and including some parts of the United States.

Intercity buses may include onboard toilets, air conditioning, reclining seats and onboard movies, and selected routes also offer free WiFi and electrical outlets located at each seat. Tickets can usually be purchased online, over the phone, at a bus terminal or via an agency.

Furthermore, every city has its own bus system to transport people within the city limits.

Ships and ferries in Canada

Canada’s marine and inland waterway transit can be divided into four geographical parts: the Pacific west coast region, the Great Lakes/St Lawrence, the Atlantic region and the northern region. There is an extensive fleet of large commercial vessels in operation in Canada, as well as an abundance of ferries, especially across the Atlantic provinces and in British Columbia.

Many provinces and territories provide seasonal and year-round ferry services connecting the mainland with islands and offering convenient inland transportation. Ferries are usually reasonably priced, with pedestrians and cyclists able to get aboard without booking ahead of time. On the other hand, car drivers are advised to make a reservation.

Taxis in Canada

Most cities in Canada usually have several different taxi companies in operation, and they can either be hailed in the street, caught at a taxi rank or pre-booked over the phone. Metered fares are usually regulated in cities and cannot be negotiated. Drivers generally expect a tip of between 10 and 15 percent. Taxi drivers in all major cities must have an identification issued by the city.

There should be a numbered plate on the rear bumper of each taxi, which shows that the vehicle is registered, and there should be an information card including ID and a photo of the driver inside the cab.

Ride-sharing apps such as Uber are also operational in Canada.

Domestic air travel in Canada

Canada is acknowledged for having a successful and safe civil aviation programme. Given the size of the country, air travel is definitely an option worth considering for expats living in Canada.

Air transit is an important form of travel in the country, which has the second-largest fleet of civil aircraft in the Western world. There are 26 airports that are part of the national airport system.

The Canadian airline industry is highly competitive. The leaders in the industry such as Air Canada are chased by rising low-cost airlines, including WestJet and Porter. Increased competition means that expats can often find great deals on domestic flights. Furthermore, Canada has a wealth of independent regional and local airlines that usually focus on small, remote regions in the north.

Cycling in Canada

Canadian towns and cities promote cycling as a means of transport and try to provide cyclists with the best possible riding conditions. Cycling is very popular, and most cities and towns have hundreds of miles of dedicated bike paths.


Cyclists in Canada must follow the same rules and road regulations as other vehicles. Wearing a helmet is compulsory in most provinces. A bike is easy to acquire in all Canadian cities and towns regardless of the style or price range. Many of the larger Canadian cities have also implemented bike-sharing schemes which make cycling an even more convenient way to get around.

Driving in Canada

Driving is the most common means of transportation in Canada. To drive in Canada, one needs a valid driving licence. Expats will be able to use their foreign driving licence for a few months, but eventually, depending on their country of origin, they will have to exchange their licence for a Canadian licence, or take a driving test in the province or territory where they live. The cost of obtaining a Canadian driving licence depends on the driver’s driving record as well as the province and territory where he or she lives. After receiving the licence, it has to be renewed regularly.

The driving age in Canada is determined on a province-by-province basis, but it’s generally 16 to learn and 17 to drive without supervision. Drivers in Canada are legally required to carry their driving licence with them whenever they drive, as well as copies of their vehicle registration and insurance.

Under Canadian law, all cars must be insured and must be registered with the person’s provincial or territorial government. Car insurance in Canada can be expensive. However, it does protect the driver financially in case of an accident. Insurance costs vary across Canada so expats should do some research before committing to any given insurance policy.

The quality of Canadian roads is excellent, yet some routes to remote destinations may be unpaved. The Trans-Canada Highway crosses the whole country. The classification of other roads varies according to different provinces or territories.

Generally, the speed limit in Canada is 66mph (110km/h) on highways, 55 mph (80km/h) on rural highways and 30mph (50km/h) on residential roads.

More information

►To learn about expat money matters see Banking, Money and Taxes in Canada

►How expensive is life in Canada? Find out in Cost of Living in Canada

Are you an expat living in Canada?

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Public transport Toronto to Waterloo

I will travel to Toronto and I will need to travel to Waterloo too (from Toronto).

  • Is there any student discount with my Hungarian student ID?


I tried to plan my trip and as I saw when I will travel to Waterloo from Toronto I will need to take the 25F bus. Is there any alternative?

As a student I don’t have much money so that’s why I would like to come out the cheapest but I don’t know how.

1 Answer 1

The public transit intercity situation in Ontario is very unlike Europe. Depending on whether you want to travel directly from the airport, or from downtown, you will have different options and I predict you will not like any of them.

There are many different providers: Go train to Kitchener, VIA train to Kitchener, Go bus (horrible slow tortuous route), Greyhound, even a Federation of Students bus at certain times of the day. Some leave from downtown, so if you’re arriving by plane you’ll need to take the UP express first to get to Union. Others leave from the airport, or from assorted suburban locations, some of which are served by the subway in Toronto. The University of Waterloo has a travel page with various links you may find useful. Since you mention 25, I guess you are considering the GO bus 25 and have looked into how to get to it from wherever you are arriving or where you will be when your business in Toronto is finished.

Go does offer discounts to post-secondary students (on Canadian public transit, the undecorated word «student» means primary and secondary school, ie before university) but only if they are attending Canadian institutions. Your Hungarian ID will not get you a discount.

Toronto: Public Transportation

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Toronto: Public Transportation

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Public transit is a great way for visitors to get around Toronto. It’s an easy, safe, and quick way to get around; in many cases it’ll also save you a lot of money compared to renting a car and paying for expensive downtown parking.

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) provides service within the city of Toronto (including all of downtown), ferries connect to the Toronto Islands, and GO Transit handles commuter service to the suburbs. All are described in more detail below.

Toronto Transit Commission (TTC)

The TTC provides subway, streetcar, and bus service within the City of Toronto. Most downtown routes have very frequent service and some run 24 hours. The TTC Trip Planner helps with directions, as does Google Transit.

Fares

You pay a single fare for each one-way trip. The same fare covers subways, streetcars, and buses within the City of Toronto — there are no fare «zones» to worry about. You can transfer between routes for free as needed to reach your destination, but you’ll need to pay a new fare for the return trip, or if you make a stopover (e.g. to shop, eat, or explore an area).

For adults, the most common fare options are:

Option Cost (current as of September 1, 2014) Notes
Cash $3.00 Bus and streetcar drivers do not make change
Tokens $2.65 When bought in quantities of 3 or 7
Day Pass — Weekday $11.00 Unlimited rides all day
«Family» Day Pass — only good on Saturdays/ Sundays/ Holidays $11.00 Unlimited rides all day; a single pass covers two adults and up to four youths (19 or under) or one adult and up to five youths
Weekly Pass $39.25 Unlimited rides from Monday to the next Sunday
Monthly Metropass $133.75 Unlimited rides from the first to the last day of the month

Tokens and passes are sold at subway stations; while there, ask the fare collector for a free TTC Ride Guide map. You can also buy tokens and passes at convenience stores displaying a «TTC Fare Media Seller» or «TTC Ticket Agent» sign.

If you are paying cash or a using a single-ride token, you can get a paper «transfer» which acts as both proof of fare paid (required on the 501 Queen and 510 Spadina streetcar lines, which have roving fare inspectors) and allows you to change between routes at street level without paying again, so long as you’re making a continuous one-way trip. Since it’s free, it’s a good idea to always get one. A transfer is dispensed by a red machine inside subway stations, or by the driver on a bus or most streetcars. For new streetcars, it’s dispensed where you pay your fare: inside the middle doors or curbside at major stops. Note that the transfer is accepted only where the two routes intersect; if you walk even a block to the next stop, the transfer is invalid, although there are some specific stops where it is permitted called Walking Transfers.

The unlimited passes give you the flexibility to hop off your streetcar or bus when you see something interesting, and get back on the next one that comes along. And on weekends, the Day Pass is an unbeatable deal — with two adults, it pays for itself on a round-trip.

Some automatic turnstiles at only a accept the regional fare card called PRESTO.

Subways

Toronto subways run very frequently, as often as every two minutes in rush hour and about every five minutes at other times. Service runs approximately 6 am to 1:30 am, with a 9 am start on Sundays. All subway trains stop at all stations along the line (there are no «express» trains or diverging routes).

The subway map is posted above doorways in each car; you can also see an interactive subway map online (click the map to scroll left and right). Downtown Toronto lies within the U-shaped part of Line 1 (Yonge-University-Spadina, shown in yellow); the Yorkville area is along Line 2 (Bloor-Danforth) between Bloor-Yonge and St. George stations.

When transferring between lines, note that «Bloor-Yonge» station is called simply «Bloor» when riding Line 1 (along Yonge) line and «Yonge» when riding Line 2 (along Bloor) line. Also, avoid transferring at Spadina — it’s a very long walk!

Each subway station has at least one staffed entrance which accepts all fares, including day passes and transfers. Other entrances are automatic and accept tokens and weekly/monthly passes only. If paying with cash or tokens and switching to a streetcar or bus later in the same trip, get a paper transfer from the small red machine just past the turnstiles.

Typical downtown subway entrances are marked with a TTC sign and/or the name of the subway station. To find your bearings when exiting a station, look for a round metal plaque in the ground near the exit. These indicate the compass directions as well as nearby streets.

Streetcars

Much of the above-ground public transit through downtown Toronto is provided by a large fleet of streetcars (known in some parts of the world as trams or trolleys). In 2007, National Geographic named the 501 Queen streetcar one of the world’s 10 best streetcar rides, and many of the routes are a great way to see the city.

All streetcar stops are marked with a white pole with red bands and a streetcar icon. In some cases, the stop and waiting area are found on a separate platform along the tracks. On other routes, the stop is found on the sidewalk just like a bus stop; in this case, wait there until the streetcar stops, then walk out onto the street to board it. (Cars are required to stop behind the streetcar while its doors are open.)

When entering older streetcars, drop your fare in the fare box; if you’re switching to another route later in the same trip, ask the driver for a transfer. Or, if you already have a transfer or pass, simply show it to the driver. When your stop is announced, pull the yellow stop request cord. If at all possible, use the rear doors to exit the streetcar.

On the TTC’s new streetcars, you can’t pay the driver. Those paying with cash or tokens should enter by the middle doors — there’s a red machine inside those doors to pay your fare and be issued a transfer. Or, at major stops, you can pay in advance using a machine located at the stop. Roving fare inspectors will check that everyone has a valid pass or transfer. You can enter or exit by any of the doors (press the button to open the doors).

Some of the route highlights — from west to east for each route — include:

  • 501 Queen: High Park (south entrance), Queen West shopping districts, City Hall, Eaton Centre, Beach neighbourhood
  • 504 King: Liberty Village, entertainment district, financial district, «old town» Toronto, Distillery District, Chinatown East
  • 505 Dundas: Chinatown, Art Gallery of Ontario, Dundas Square, Chinatown East
  • 506 Carlton: High Park (east entrance), Little Italy, University of Toronto, Cabbagetown, Little India
  • 509 Harbourfront: Exhibition Place, central waterfront, Toronto Island ferries, Union Station
  • 510 Spadina: [from north to south] University of Toronto, Chinatown, central waterfront, Toronto Island ferries, Union Station

Buses

TTC buses operate the same way as most buses in other North American cities. Outside the downtown core, it’s important to plan your trip carefully, as some buses run infrequently and not all routes run at all times.

All bus stops are marked with a white pole with red bands and a bus icon ( photo with a bus stop pole at the far left). When boarding the bus, drop your fare in the fare box; if you’re switching to another route later in the same trip, ask the driver for a transfer. Or, if you already have a transfer or pass, simply show it to the driver. When your stop is announced, pull the yellow stop request cord or press one of the «Stop» buttons. If at all possible, use the rear door to exit.

From the Airport

For all your options, including TTC routes, see the articles Toronto: Getting Downtown from Pearson Airport (for most flights) or Toronto: Getting Downtown from the Island airport (for Porter Airlines and a handful of Air Canada Express flights from Montreal).

Maps and Trip Planning

You can get a free Ride Guide, with maps and travel tips, at the collector’s booth at any subway station. Or you can view the full system map online. The TTC’s downtown map (486 KB PDF) covers most major attractions and is handy even if you’re walking or driving.

The TTC has now added a trip planner to their website, and Google Transit now includes TTC, GO Transit, and other Toronto-area routes when you request directions and click «By public transit». The TripAdvisor Toronto Forum can also help you find the best route, or you can call the TTC Info line at +1-(416) 393-4636.

There are numerous applications, many free of charge, available for both Android and iPhone/iPad that will aid you with your trip planning as well. With them, it is possible to plan your route and to see when a bus or streetcar will be arriving at a particular stop.

Toronto Island Ferry

The ferries to the Toronto Islands operate separately from the TTC. Fares (as of summer 2014) are $7 for adults, $4.50 for students and seniors, and $3.50 for children under 14. The return trip from the islands is free.

In the summer, try to go on a weekday: sunny summer weekends see ferry lineups more than an hour long. In other seasons, the ferries do still operate, but less often. Schedules can be found on the Toronto Island Park web site.

The Toronto Island ferry cannot be used to reach the Island airport; see Toronto: Getting Downtown from the Island airport instead.

GO Transit

GO Transit is the commuter rail and bus service that connects cities and towns across the greater Toronto area. It reaches as far north as Barrie, west to Hamilton, and a bit east of Oshawa. It also runs summer weekend service to Niagara Falls. You can find schedules and calculate fares on the GO Transit web site.

GO trains and buses arrive in downtown Toronto at Union Station. Service is much less frequent than the TTC — often an hour between trips — and some routes only run during rush hour. Although GO Transit stations have large parking lots, these often fill up early on weekday mornings with regular commuters. Outside the city of Toronto, local transit serving GO stations may be quite limited.

Other Toronto-Area Transit Services

Although most visitors won’t use them, the Greater Toronto Area is served by a number of other local transit services. Check schedules carefully as many routes have infrequent service.

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