Remembrance Day Канада


Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day is a day to honor and remember the soldiers, sailors and airmen who died during the service to their country. It is a holiday much like Veteran’s Day in the United States, and is observed in the 53 member countries of the Commonwealth Of Nations. This day – also known as Poppy Day – is observed on November 11th because that is the date in 1918 when general hostilities ceased during World War I, although the war didn’t officially end until 1919 when the Treaty of Versailles was signed.

The Remembrance Day ceremony in the Commonwealth usually begins with a bugle or trumpet call called “The Last Post” which is then followed by two minutes of silence. After this period of silence, the observance then proceeds with the sounding of another bugle call – either Reveille or The Rouse – which is then followed by the Ode Of Remembrance, which is taken from the Laurence Binyon poem entitled ‘For the Fallen’. A poem that first appeared in The Times in 1914. While this poem is recited, there are a handful of songs that are usually played during the service. This includes “Flowers Of The Forest” and “I Vow to Thee, My Country.” Services can often also include blessings, national anthems, color guards and the laying of wreaths. Night vigils may or may not be part of the ceremony as well.

Remembrance Day — Canada

Observed on November 11th, Remembrance Day marks the end of World War I. This has taken place since the war ended in 1918.

Celebration\ Observance

Many have a moment of silence for those who died in World War I. Others remember a lost family member and the effects of war on an entire global scale.

History

As soon as the war ended the allied forces knew that there had to be a day when those who were brave enough to fight had to be honored. Around the world their was a debate on what day, but for Canada it rests on November 11th.

Canada Public Holidays

Date of Remembrance Day

Year Day Date 2020 Sunday November 11 2020 Monday November 11 2020 Wednesday November 11 2021 Thursday November 11 2022 Friday November 11

Yearly Calendars

Provides calendars for the calendar year for Canada.

Holiday Dates for the Year

Provides the dates for holidays for the calendar year for Canada.

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Remembrance Day

English-Russian dictionary of expressions . 2014 .

Смотреть что такое «Remembrance Day» в других словарях:

Remembrance Day — n. in Canada, a day (Nov. 11) honoring veterans of WWI and WWII … English World dictionary

Remembrance Day — Infobox Hol >Wikipedia

Remembrance Day — /rəˈmɛmbrəns deɪ/ (say ruh membruhns day) noun the anniversary of the end of World War I on 11 November 1918, when the armistice was signed. Also, Armistice Day. Ceremonies to remember those who died or suffered in World War I, and to reflect on… … Australian English dictionary


Remembrance Day — N UNCOUNT: oft N n In Britain, Remembrance Day or Remembrance Sunday is the Sunday nearest to the 11th of November, when people honour the memory of those who died in the two world wars. During their stay, they will attend a Remembrance Day… … English dictionary

Remembrance Day — UK / US noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms Remembrance Day : singular Remembrance Day plural Remembrance Days the Sunday nearest 11th November in the UK and Canada when the country honours the people who died in the First and Second World… … English dictionary

Remembrance Day — Jour du Souvenir Le jour du Souvenir[1] (en anglais Remembrance Day), aussi connu comme jour de l Armistice, est une journée de commémoration annuelle observée en Europe et dans les pays du Commonwealth pour commémorer les sacrifices de la… … Wikipédia en Français

Remembrance Day — noun the Sunday nearest to November 11 when those who died in World War I and World War II are commemorated • Syn: ↑Remembrance Sunday, ↑Poppy Day • Regions: ↑United Kingdom, ↑UK, ↑U.K., ↑Britain, ↑ … Useful english dictionary

Remembrance Day — noun a) The Sunday closest to November 11, observed in commemoration of the fallen in the two World Wars. b) November 11, a federal hol >Wiktionary

Remembrance Day — noun 1》 another term for Remembrance Sunday. 2》 historical another term for Armistice Day … English new terms dictionary

Remembrance Day — noun Date: 1918 November 11 set as >New Collegiate Dictionary

Remembrance Day — also Remembrance Sunday noun the Sunday nearest to November 11th, when a ceremony is held in Britain to remember people who were killed in the two world wars … Longman dictionary of contemporary English

Remembrance Day 2020

Remembrance Day, also known as Armistice Day or Poppy Day, is technically meant to honor the end of World War One, which occurred at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. But Remembrance Day has long been a time to pay respect to the fallen from all wars. Traditions used to observe Remembrance Day include the wearing of poppies, and a two-minute silence at 11 AM on the eleventh day of the eleventh month. Although Veterans Day is observed in the U.S. on November 11, Remembrance Day functions elsewhere in the world more closely related to Memorial Day in May.

Remembrance Day will on be on Monday, November 11, 2020.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Angela Lorden.

When Did The First Moment of Silence Occur?

It is said that the first moment of silence associated with Remembrance Day was a tradition adopted by British military members stationed in South Africa in 1918. There was one minute of silence to honor the fallen, and one to honor those who had returned.

This tradition was relayed back to Britain, and one year after the end of World War One, King George V held a similar two minute silence. He intended it as a public moment so “the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead” according to an article published on the BBC official site.

Are There Two Remembrance Days?

Remembrance Day is honored in many countries around the world, but in some areas (including Britain and other “Commonwealth countries”) there is also “Remembrance Sunday” held each year on the Sunday nearest to November 11.

Remembrance Day in Canada

Remembrance Day in Canada is celebrated in the following ways:

  • Remembrance Day is recognized as national holiday
  • Leading up to Remembrance Day many people wear artificial poppies.
  • Special church services are held which often includes the playing of “The Last Post” or the 4th verse of the “Ode of Remembrance”
  • Two minutes of silence is held at 11:00 a.m. during most services and ceremonies
  • Wreaths are laid at local war memorials
  • National War Memorials have official ceremonies
  • Many people lay poppies, letters and photographs on the tomb
  • It varies by province in how the holiday is observed

Why Are Poppies Worn On Remembrance Day?

The poppy grew into a symbol of the fallen thanks to the poetry of a Canadian military physician, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae. He wrote In Flanders Fields, which includes the following:


In Flanders fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

Photo by Capt. Keenan Kunst.

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

According to the British Legion official site, “Bright red Flanders poppies (Papaver rhoeas) however, were delicate but resilient flowers and grew in their thousands, flourishing even in the middle of chaos and destruction”.

These flowers definitely left an impression on Lt. Col. McCrae, and his poetry inspired an American named Moina Michael, “to make and sell red silk poppies which were brought to England by a French woman, Anna Guérin.”

The British Legion reports that in present times, the use of the poppy doesn’t just honor the fallen, but in some cases it also employs many disabled service members. “Over 5 million Scottish poppies (which have four petals and no leaf unlike poppies in the rest of the UK) are still made by hand by disabled ex-Servicemen at Lady Haig’s Poppy Factory each year”.

Today, the American Legion and many other organizations also use the poppy in fundraising and awareness efforts associated with Remembrance Day.

What are we remembering on Remembrance Day?

Posted October 24, 2020

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November 11 is Remembrance Day in Canada. This event is celebrated each year all over the nation.

What are we remembering?

Also known as Armistice Day, Remembrance Day commemorates the service of the armed forces – soldiers, airmen and sailors – who fought and died in armed conflicts since the first World War. November 11 at 11 am in 1918 (the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month) marks the date and time when armies stopped fighting in WWI. In the US, it is called Veteran’s Day, also celebrated on November 11.

Remembrance Day is also a chance to honour people who continue to serve in war, military conflict, and international peacekeeping missions. On this day, we acknowledge the important role of the men and women who risk life and limb to uphold world peace.

Is it a holiday?

Remembrance Day is a federal statutory holiday. Although it is not a statutory holiday in Manitoba, the province outlines restrictions for operating business and special requirements for paying employees who work on November 11.

Also, all schools, civic offices, and many businesses are closed. So are public libraries, most public leisure and recreation centres, as well as banks and credit unions. However, most grocery stores, shopping malls, museums and galleries are open starting at 1 p.m. To be sure of schedules, check online before you go.

How do Canadians celebrate it?

All government buildings fly the Canadian flag on this special day. And at exactly 11 a.m., everyone observes a two minute silence. Some people gather in memorial parks, community halls, workplaces, schools, homes and parks to observe this silence to honour fallen soldiers.

Every year, there is a National Remembrance Day Ceremony held at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. It is broadcasted nationally. The ceremony gathers veterans from all wars and peace support operations, dignitaries, the Canadian Armed Forces, the RCMP, members of the Diplomatic Corps and youth representatives. However, everyone can take part in the ceremony by attending or tuning in.

Prior to Remembrance Day (usually the last Friday of October), you will notice that many people start wearing a red flower on their clothes. This is the poppy flower. It symbolizes respect and support for the Canadian troops. You can get these poppy pins from members of the Royal Canadian Legion (usually in public places or in some commercial establishments) who hand them out for free or for a small donation. All donations go to the Legion’s Poppy Fund which supports serving and retired veterans and their families.


Why poppies?

After WWI, the poppy flower was adopted as a symbol of Remembrance. This was inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields” written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian doctor. In the poem, he paints a poignant picture of bright red poppies growing amidst reminders of death and loss during the war. Poppies have since become a symbol of respect for those who served and died for their country in Canada, Great Britain, the nations of Commonwealth, and the United States.

“In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae (recited by Leonard Cohen)
from Legion Magazine

Remembrance Sunday

The hol > Armistice Day, which was dedicated in Great Britain on Nov. 11, 1919, in commemoration of the one-year anniversary of the peace agreement that ended World War I. In response to a politician’s suggestion, King George V requested that the country pause in silence for two minutes in acknowledgment of the war’s fatalities. Thereafter a period of silence became the centrepiece of Armistice Day events that occurred annually until the outbreak of World War II in 1939, when it was decided that general celebrations would not be held on November 11 of that year. Instead, a proximate Sunday was observed as a “day of dedication” during the span of the war. After the conclusion of World War II, the British government, seeking to honour participants in both World Wars, officially replaced Armistice Day with the new Sunday observance, which was thereafter known as Remembrance Sunday. In 1956 the date was fixed as the second Sunday of the month. In recent years Armistice Day has been revived as an additional occasion for silence, though Remembrance Sunday remains the main day of commemoration.

The most recognizable symbol of Remembrance Sunday is the red poppy, which became associated with World War I memorials after scores of the flowers bloomed in the former battlefields of Belgium and northern France. (The phenomenon was depicted in the popular 1915 poem “In Flanders Fields,” by Canadian soldier John McCrae.) In 1921 the newly formed British Legion (now the Royal British Legion), a charitable organization for veterans, began selling red paper poppies for Armistice Day, and its annual Poppy Appeal has been enormously successful since. In addition to poppies intended to be worn on clothing, wreaths made of poppies are frequently displayed at memorial sites. Beginning in the 1930s, some groups have alternatively promoted white poppies as an emblem of peace, though this has often met with controversy.

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Holidays similar to Remembrance Sunday are still celebrated on November 11 in other countries, such as the United States (Veterans Day) and Australia, Canada, and France (Remembrance Day).

Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day (sometimes known informally as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth of Nations member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. Following a tradition inaugurated by King George V in 1919,[1] the day is also marked by war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November in most countries to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended «at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month», in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. («At the 11th hour» refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.[2]

The memorial evolved out of Armistice Day, which continues to be marked on the same date. The initial Armistice Day was observed at Buckingham Palace, commencing with King George V hosting a «Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic»[3] during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem «In Flanders Fields» written by Canadian physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae. After reading the poem, Moina Michael, a professor at the University of Georgia, wrote the poem, «We Shall Remember,» and swore to wear a red poppy on the anniversary. The custom spread to Europe and the countries of the British Empire and Commonwealth within three years. Madame Anne E. Guerin tirelessly promoted the practice in Europe and the British Empire. In the UK Major George Howson fostered the cause with the support of General Haig. Poppies were worn for the first time at the 1921 anniversary ceremony. At first real poppies were worn. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I; their brilliant red colour became a symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

1 Observance in the Commonwealth 1.1 Australia 1.2 Barbados 1.3 Belize 1.4 Canada 1.5 India 1.6 Kenya 1.7 New Zealand 1.8 Saint Lucia 1.9 South Africa 1.10 United Kingdom 1.10.1 Northern Ireland 1.10.2 Bermuda 2 Similar observances outside the Commonwealth 2.1 France and Belgium 2.2 Denmark 2.3 Germany 2.4 Hong Kong 2.5 Ireland 2.6 Israel 2.7 Italy 2.8 Netherlands 2.9 Norway 2.10 Poland 2.11 United States

3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links

Observance in the Commonwealth Edit

The common British, Canadian, South African, and ANZAC tradition includes a one- or two-minute silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (11:00 am, 11 November), as that marks the time (in the United Kingdom) when the armistice became effective.

The Service of Remembrance in many Commonwealth countries generally includes the sounding of the «Last Post», followed by the period of silence, followed by the sounding of «Reveille» or sometimes just «The Rouse» (often confused for each other), and finished by a recitation of the «Ode of Remembrance». The «Flowers of the Forest», «O Valiant Hearts», «I Vow to Thee, My Country» and «Jerusalem» are often played during the service. Services also include wreaths laid to honour the fallen, a blessing, and national anthems.[4]

The central ritual at cenotaphs throughout the Commonwealth is a stylised night vigil. The Last Post was the common bugle call at the close of the military day, and The Rouse was the first call of the morning. For military purposes, the traditional night vigil over the slain was not just to ensure they were indeed dead and not unconscious or in a coma, but also to guard them from being mutilated or despoiled by the enemy, or dragged off by scavengers. This makes the ritual more than just an act of remembrance but also a pledge to guard the honour of war dead. The act is enhanced by the use of dedicated cenotaphs (literally Greek for «empty tomb») and the laying of wreaths—the traditional means of signalling high honours in ancient Greece and Rome.

In Australia, Remembrance Day is always observed on 11 November, regardless of the day of the week, and is not a public holiday; it is a time when people can pay their respects to the substantial number of soldiers who died in battle. Some institutions observe two-minute’s silence at 11 am through a programme named Read 2 Remember,[5] children read the Pledge of Remembrance by Rupert McCall and teachers deliver specially developed resources to help children understand the significance of the day and the resilience of those who have fought for their country and call on children to also be resilient when facing difficult times. Services are held at 11 am at war memorials and schools in suburbs and cities across the country, at which the «Last Post» is sounded by a bugler and a one-minute silence is observed. In recent decades, Remembrance Day has been largely eclipsed as the national day of war commemoration by ANZAC Day (25 April), which is a public holiday in all states.

When Remembrance Day falls on a normal working day in Melbourne and other major cities, buglers from the Australian Defence Force often play the «Last Post» at major street corners in the CBD. While this occurs, the majority of passers by stop and observe a moment of silence while waiting for the bugler to finish the recital.

In Barbados, Remembrance Day is not a public holiday. It is recognised as 11 November, but the parade and ceremonial events are carried out on Remembrance Sunday.[6] The day is celebrated to recognise the Barbadian soldiers who died fighting in the First and Second World Wars. The parade is held at National Heroes’ Square, where an interdenominational service is held.[7] The Governor-General and Barbadian Prime Minister are among those who attend, along with other government dignitaries and the heads of the police and military forces. During the main ceremony a gun salute, wreaths, and prayers are also performed at the war memorial Cenotaph at the heart of Heroes’ Square in Bridgetown.

In Belize, Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November.[8] It is not a public holiday.

The Thin Red Line by Harold H. Piffard from Canada in Khaki showing red poppies separating the war and peace In Canada, Remembrance Day is a statutory holiday in all three territories and in six of the ten provinces (Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec being the exceptions).[9][10][11][12] From 1921 to 1930, the Armistice Day Act provided that Thanksgiving would be observed on Armistice Day, which was fixed by statute on the Monday of the week in which 11 November fell. In 1931, the federal parliament adopted an act to amend the Armistice Day Act, providing that the day should be observed on 11 November and that the day should be known as Remembrance Day.[13] A bill (C-597) intended to make Remembrance Day a federal statutory holiday was tabled in the House of Commons during the 41st parliament, but died on the order paper when parliament was dissolved for a federal election.[14]

The federal department of Veterans Affairs Canada states that the date is of «remembrance for the men and women who have served, and continue to serve our country during times of war, conflict and peace»; particularly the First and Second World Wars, the Korean War, and all conflicts since then in which members of the Canadian Armed Forces have participated.[15] The department runs a program called Canada Remembers with the mission of helping young and new Canadians, most of whom have never known war, «come to understand and appreciate what those who have served Canada in times of war, armed conflict and peace stand for and what they have sacrificed for their country.»[16]


The official national ceremonies are held at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. These are presided over by the Governor General of Canada and attended by the prime minister, other dignitaries, the Silver Cross Mother, and public observers. Occasionally, a member of the Canadian Royal Family may also be present (such as Prince Charles in 2009[17] and Princess Anne in 2014[18]).

Before the start of the event, four sentries and three sentinels (two flag sentinels and one nursing sister) are posted at the foot of the cenotaph. The commemoration then typically begin with the tolling of the carillon in the Peace Tower, during which current members of the armed forces arrive at Confederation Square, followed by the Ottawa diplomatic corps, ministers of the Crown, special guests, the Royal Canadian Legion (RCL), the royal party (if present), and the viceregal party. The arrival of the governor general is announced by a trumpeter sounding the «Alert», whereupon the viceroy is met by the Dominion President of the RCL and escorted to a dais to receive the Viceregal Salute, after which the national anthem, «O Canada», is played.

The moment of remembrance begins with the bugling of «Last Post» immediately before 11:00 am, at which time the gun salute fires and the bells of the Peace Tower toll the hour. Another gun salute signals the end of the two minutes of silence, and cues the playing of a lament, the bugling of «The Rouse», and the reading of the Act of Remembrance. A flypast of Royal Canadian Air Force craft then occurs at the start of a 21-gun salute, upon the completion of which a choir sings «In Flanders Fields». The various parties then lay their wreaths at the base of the memorial; one wreath is set by the Silver Cross Mother (a recent recipient of the Memorial Cross) on behalf of all mothers whose children died in conflicts in which Canada participated. The viceregal and/or royal group return to the dais to receive the playing of the Canadian Royal Anthem, «God Save the Queen», prior to the assembled armed forces personnel and veterans performing a march past in front of the viceroy and any royal guest, bringing about the end of the official ceremonies.[19] A tradition of paying more personal tribute has emerged since erection of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the War Memorial in 2000: after the official ceremony the general public place their poppies atop the tomb.

Similar ceremonies take place in provincial capitals across the country, officiated by the relevant lieutenant governor, as well as in other cities, towns, and even hotels or corporate headquarters. Schools will usually hold special assemblies for the first half of the day, or on the school day prior, with various presentations concerning the remembrance of the war dead. The largest indoor ceremony in Canada is usually held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with over 9,000 gathering in Credit Union Centre in 2010;[20] the ceremony participants include veterans, current members of the Canadian forces, and sea, army, and air cadet units.

In 2001, Merchant Navy Remembrance Day was created by the Canadian parliament, designating 3 September as a day to recognize the contributions and sacrifice of Canadian merchant mariners.[21]

In India, the day is usually marked by tributes and ceremonies in army cantonments. There are memorial services in some churches such as St. Mark’s Cathedral and St. John’s Church in Bangalore.[22] At Kohima and Imphal in the remote hillsides of North East India, services of remembrance supported by the Indian Army are observed at Kohima and Imphal War Cemeteries (maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission). The day is also marked at the Delhi War Cemetery.[23] In other places in India this event is not observed. In 2013, Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, marked the day in Mumbai’s St. John the Evangelist Church.[24]

In Kenya, the Kenya Armed Forces Old Comrades Association (KAFOCA) was established in Kenya immediately in 1945 to cater for the welfare of the Ex-servicemen of the First and the Second World Wars. The KAFOCA and Kenyan government recognise Remembrance Day.

New Zealand’s national day of remembrance is Anzac Day, 25 April.[25] «Poppy Day» usually occurs on the Friday before Anzac Day.[26] The reason for New Zealand having their remembrance on Anzac Day happened in 1921. The paper Poppies for Armistice that year arrived by ship too late for 11 November 1921, so an RSA branch distributed them at the next commemoration date (25 April 1922, which happened to be Anzac Day) and that date stuck as the new Poppy Day in New Zealand.

Armistice Day was observed in New Zealand between the World Wars, although it was always secondary to Anzac Day. As in other countries, New Zealand’s Armistice Day was converted to Remembrance Day after World War II, but this was not a success. By the mid-1950s the day was virtually ignored, even by churches and veterans’ organisations.[27]

Since the Unknown Warrior being returned to New Zealand for Armistice Day 2004, more ceremonies are now being held in New Zealand on Armistice Day and more churches are now observing Remembrance Sunday.

Like Barbados, St. Lucia does not recognize Remembrance day as a public holiday. Instead, ceremonial events such as parades and other activities are held on Remembrance Sunday. The parade is held at the central square, namely the Derek Walcott Square, where the Cenotaph is located. There, members of the Royal St Lucia Police Force and other uniformed groups such as the St Lucia Cadet Corps pay tribute through commemoration of St. Lucian men and women who fought in the war.

In South Africa, Remembrance Day is not a public holiday. Commemoration ceremonies are usually held on the nearest Sunday, at which the «Last Post» is played by a bugler followed by the observation of a two-minute silence. Ceremonies to mark the event in South Africa are held at the Cenotaph in Cape Town,[28] and in Pretoria at the Voortrekker Monument cenotaph and the War Memorial at the Union Buildings. Many high schools hold Remembrance Day services to honour the past pupils who died in the two World Wars and the Border war. In addition, the South African Legion of Military Veterans holds a street collection on the nearest Saturday to gather funds to assist in welfare work among military veterans.[29]

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In the United Kingdom, the main observance is on the Sunday nearest to 11 November, Remembrance Sunday with two minutes of silence observed on 11 November itself, a custom which had lapsed before a campaign for its revival began in the 1990s.[30] Ceremonies are held at local war memorials, usually organised by local branches of the Royal British Legion, an association for ex-servicemen. Typically, poppy wreaths are laid by representatives of the Crown, the armed forces, and local civic leaders, as well as by local organisations including ex-servicemen organisations, cadet forces, the Scouts, Guides, Boys’ Brigade, St John Ambulance and the Salvation Army. The start and end of the silence is often also marked by the firing of an artillery piece. A minute’s or two minutes’ silence is also frequently incorporated into church services. Further wreath-laying ceremonies are observed at most war memorials across the UK at 11 am on 11 November, led by the Royal British Legion.[30] The beginning and end of the two minutes’ silence is often marked in large towns and cities by the firing of ceremonial cannon[31] and many employers and businesses invite their staff and customers to observe the two minutes’ silence at 11:00 am.[32]

The First Two Minute Silence in London (11 November 1919) was reported in the Manchester Guardian on 12 November 1919:

The first stroke of eleven produced a magical effect.

The tram cars glided into stillness, motors ceased to cough and fume, and stopped dead, and the mighty-limbed dray horses hunched back upon their loads and stopped also, seeming to do it of their own volition.

Someone took off his hat, and with a nervous hesitancy the rest of the men bowed their heads also. Here and there an old soldier could be detected slipping unconsciously into the posture of ‘attention’. An elderly woman, not far away, wiped her eyes, and the man beside her looked white and stern. Everyone stood very still . The hush deepened. It had spread over the whole city and become so pronounced as to impress one with a sense of audibility. It was a silence which was almost pain . And the spirit of memory brooded over it all.[33]

The main national commemoration is held at Whitehall, in Central London, for dignitaries, the public, and ceremonial detachments from the armed forces and civilian uniformed services such as the Merchant Navy and Her Majesty’s Coastguard. Members of the British Royal Family walk through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office towards the Cenotaph, assembling to the right of the monument to wait for Big Ben to strike 11:00 am, and for the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery at Horse Guards Parade, to fire the cannon marking the commencement of the two minutes of silence. Following this, «Last Post» is sounded by the buglers of the Royal Marines. «The Rouse» is then sounded by the trumpeters of the Royal Air Force, after which wreaths are laid by the Queen and senior members of the Royal Family attending in military uniform and then, to «Beethoven’s Funeral March» (composed by Johann Heinrich Walch), by attendees in the following order: the Prime Minister; the leaders of the major political parties from all parts of the United Kingdom; Commonwealth High Commissioners to London, on behalf of their respective nations; the Foreign Secretary, on behalf of the British Dependencies; the First Sea Lord; the Chief of the General Staff; the Chief of the Air Staff; representatives of the merchant navy and Fishing Fleets and the merchant air service. Other members of the Royal Family usually watch the service from the balcony of the Foreign Office. The service is generally conducted by the Bishop of London, with a choir from the Chapels Royal, in the presence of representatives of all major faiths in the United Kingdom. Before the marching commences, the members of the Royal Family and public sing the national anthem before the Royal Delegation lead out after the main service.

Members of the Reserve Forces and cadet organisations join in with the marching, alongside volunteers from St John Ambulance, paramedics from the London Ambulance Service, and conflict veterans from World War II, Korea, the Falklands, the Persian Gulf, Kosovo, Bosnia, Northern Ireland, Iraq, other past conflicts and the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan. The last three then known British-resident veterans of World War I, Bill Stone, Henry Allingham and Harry Patch, attended the 2008 ceremony but all died in 2009. After the service, there is a parade of veterans, who also lay wreaths at the foot of the Cenotaph as they pass, and a salute is taken by a member of the Royal Family at Horse Guards Parade.

In the United Kingdom, Armed Forces’ Day (formerly Veterans’ Day) is a separate commemoration, celebrated for the first time on 27 June 2009.

In 2014 the Royal Mint issued a colour-printed Alderney £5 coin , designed by engraver Laura Clancy, to commemorate Remembrance Day.[34]

Also in 2014, to commemorate the outbreak of World War I a massive display of 888,246 ceramic poppies was installed in the moat of the Tower of London, each poppy representing a British Empire fatality.


Remembrance Day is officially observed in Northern Ireland in the same way as in Great Britain. However, it has tended to be associated with the unionist community. Most Irish nationalists and republicans do not take part in the public commemoration of British soldiers. This is mainly due to the actions of the British Army during The Troubles. However, some moderate nationalists began to attend Remembrance Day events as a way to connect with the unionist community. In 1987 a bomb was detonated by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) just before a Remembrance Sunday ceremony in Enniskillen, killing eleven people. The IRA said it had made a mistake and had been targeting soldiers parading to the war memorial. The bombing was widely condemned and attendance at Remembrance events, by both nationalists and unionists, rose in the following years.[35] The Republic of Ireland has a National Day of Commemoration in July for all Irish people who have died in war.

In Bermuda, which sent the first colonial volunteer unit to the Western Front in 1915, and which had more people per capita in uniform during the Second World War than any other part of the Empire, Remembrance Day is still an important holiday. The parade in Hamilton had historically been a large and colourful one, as contingents from the Royal Navy, British Regular Army and Territorial Army units of the Bermuda Garrison, the Canadian Forces, the US Army, Air Force, and Navy, and various cadet corps and other services all at one time or another marched with the veterans. Since the closing of British, Canadian, and American bases in 1995, the parade has barely grown smaller. In addition to the ceremony held in the City of Hamilton on Remembrance Day itself, marching to the Cenotaph (a smaller replica of the one in London), where wreaths are laid and orations made, the Royal Navy and the Bermuda Sea Cadet Corps held a parade the same day at the HMS Jervis Bay memorial in Hamilton, and a smaller military parade is also held in St. George’s on the nearest Sunday to Remembrance Day.[36]

Similar observances outside the Commonwealth Edit

France and Belgium

Bleuet de France, circa 1950 Remembrance Day (11 November) is a national holiday in France and Belgium. It commemorates the armistice signed between the Allies and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front, which took effect at 11:00 am—the «eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.» Armistice Day is one of the most important military celebrations in France, since it was a major French victory and the French paid a heavy price in blood to achieve it. The First World War was considered in France as the «Great Patriotic War».[37] Almost all French villages feature memorials dedicated to those fallen during the conflict.[38] In France the blue cornflower (Bleuet de France) is used symbolically rather than the poppy.

In 2009 the Danish government established Veterans’ Day with early events on 5 September where past and present members of the armed forces, who have done service in armed conflict, are remembered.[39]

The German national day of mourning is the secular public holiday of Volkstrauertag,[40] which since 1952 has been observed two Sundays before the first Sunday of Advent;[41] in practice this is the Sunday closest to 16 November. The anniversary of the Armistice itself is not observed in Germany.[42]

Each of the major German churches has its own festivals for commemorating the dead, observed in November: All Souls Day in the case of the Roman Catholic Church, Ewigkeitssonntag or «Eternity Sunday» in the case of the Lutheran church.

Though not a public holiday since July 1997, Remembrance Sunday is observed in Hong Kong, and is marked by a multi-faith memorial service at the Cenotaph in Central, Hong Kong. The service is organised by the Hong Kong ex-servicemen Association, and is attended by various Government officials and the representatives of various religious traditions such as the Anglican Church, the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Buddhist community, the Taoist community, the Muslim community and the Sikh community.

Although Hong Kong ceased to be part of the Commonwealth of Nations in 1997, the memorial service still resembles those in many other Commonwealth countries. The service includes the sounding of «Last Post», two minutes of silence, the sounding of «Reveille», the laying of wreaths, and prayers, and ends with a recitation of the «Ode of Remembrance». The Hong Kong Police Band continues to perform their ceremonial duty at the service. Members of the Hong Kong Air Cadet Corps (including the Ceremonial Squadron), Hong Kong Adventure Corps, Hong Kong Sea Cadet Corps and scouting organisations are also in attendance.

In the Republic of Ireland, Armistice or Remembrance Day is not a public holiday. In July there is a National Day of Commemoration for Irish men and women who have died in war. Nevertheless, Remembrance Sunday is marked by a ceremony in St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, which the President of Ireland attends.[43][44][45] During World War I, many Irishmen served in the British Army, but official commemoration of them (and other British soldiers) has been controversial. The British Army was used to suppress the Easter Rising (1916) and fought the forces of the Irish Republic during the Irish War of Independence (1919–22). A very small number of people living in the Republic still enlist in the British Army,[46][47][48] although the British Army is banned from recruiting there under the Defence Act 1954.[49][50] The Irish National War Memorial Gardens in Dublin is dedicated to the memory of the 49,400 Irish soldiers who were killed in action in World War I.[51]

In Israel there are two ceremonies, the first being in Jerusalem, at the British War Cemetery on the Saturday before Remembrance Sunday, organised by the British Consul in Jerusalem. The second ceremony is in Ramleh on the Sunday itself, organised by the British embassy in Tel Aviv. The Ramleh ceremony is the larger, and is also attended by veterans of the Second World War.

In Italy, soldiers who died for the nation are remembered on 4 November, when the ceasefire that followed the Armistice of Villa Giusti in 1918 began. The Day is known as the Day of National Unity Day of the Armed Forces, Giorno dell’Unità Nazionale Giornata delle Forze Armate in Italian.[52] Since 1977, this day has not been a public holiday; now, many services are held on the first Sunday in November.[53]

Main article: Remembrance of the Dead

In the Netherlands, Remembrance Day is commemorated annually on 4 May. It is not a public holiday. Throughout the country, military personnel and civilians fallen in various conflicts since World War II are remembered. The main ceremonies are at the Waalsdorpervlakte near The Hague, the Grebbeberg near Wageningen and Dam Square in Amsterdam. Two minutes of silence are observed at 8:00 pm. Remembrance Day is followed by Liberation Day on 5 May.

Main article: Veterans Day (Norway)

In Norway the Norwegian Armed Forces commemorate Veteran’s Day. The Norwegian Parliament, the Storting, decreed that Veteran’s Day would be observed on the same day as Victory in Europe Day, in Norway known as «Frigjøringsdagen», or Liberation Day. The ceremonies are held annually in Akershus Fortress, with the King of Norway, Harald V, present. The first of such ceremonies was held on 8 May 2011, with two Norwegian Special Forces Operators being awarded the War Cross for deployments in the recent War in Afghanistan. The ceremonies are observed with memorials and military salutes.

Main article: Polish Independence Day

11 November is a public holiday in Poland called Independence Day, as the ending of First World War allowed Polish people to regain the freedom and unity of their country after over a hundred years of partitions. Major events include laying flowers on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier by members of the government and highest authorities, other public ceremonies and church services and school celebrations.

Veterans Day is observed in the United States on 11 November, and is both a federal holiday and a state holiday in all states. However, the function of the observance elsewhere is more closely matched by Memorial Day in May. In the United States, and some other allied nations, 11 November was formerly known as Armistice Day; in the United States it was given its new name in 1954 at the end of the Korean War to honor all veterans. Veterans Day is observed with memorial ceremonies, salutes at military cemeteries, and parades.

See also Edit

iconHolidays portal British Army portal iconCanadian Armed Forces portal Military of Australia portal White poppy (symbol) American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and their Descendants Collective memory Earl Haig Fund Heroes Day (Indonesia) Remembrance Day bombing Remembrance of the Dead (The Netherlands) Returned and Services League of Australia Royal New Zealand Returned and Services’ Association The Soldier The Unknown Warrior Veterans’ Bill of Rights Victory Day Victory Day (Eastern Front) Volkstrauertag

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Notes Edit


1.Jump up ^ «The Remembrance Ceremony». rsa.org.nz. Archived from the original on 4 June 2010. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 2.Jump up ^ «World War I Ended With the Treaty of Versailles». 3.Jump up ^ Banquet in honour of The President of the French Republic, Monday 10 November 1919 at the Royal Collection. 4.Jump up ^ «A Guide to Commemorative Services – Veterans Affairs Canada». Veterans Affairs Canada. 1 October 2011. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 5.Jump up ^ «Read 2 Remember». Retrieved 11 November 2011. 6.Jump up ^ Staff writer (9 November 2009). «Remembrance Day Parade». CBC. Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation. 5297144. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 7.Jump up ^ Sealy, Donna (9 November 2009). «Salute to war dead». Nation Newspaper. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 8.Jump up ^ Trujillo, Renee (11 November 2015). «Remembrance Day Observed in Belize». LoveFM. Retrieved 12 November 2015. 9.Jump up ^ Ministry of Labour and Advanced Education. «Remembrance Day Holiday in Nova Scotia». Queen’s Printer for Nova Scotia. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 10.Jump up ^ «Statutory holidays in Ontario». Statutory Holidays Canada. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 11.Jump up ^ Office of Employment Standards. «Remembrance Day in Manitoba». Queen’s Printer for Manitoba. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 12.Jump up ^ «Public Holidays in Canada». Statutory Holidays Canada. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 13.Jump up ^ Department of Canadian Heritage. «Thanksgiving and Remembrance Day». Queen’s Printer for Canada. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 14.Jump up ^ «Remembrance Day a statutory holiday? Attempt to make it so clears hurdle». CTV News. 6 November 2014. Retrieved 10 November 2014. 15.Jump up ^ Veterans Affairs Canada (23 October 2014). «Remembrance – History – A Day of Remembrance – Introduction». Queen’s Printer for Canada. Retrieved 13 October 2020. 16.Jump up ^ Veterans Affairs Canada. «Canada Remembers > About Canada Remembers». Queen’s Printer for Canada. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 17.Jump up ^ «Government of Canada Announces the Itinerary for the 2009 Visit of The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall». 30 October 2009. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 18.Jump up ^ The Canadian Press (11 November 2014). «Canada remembers: Governor General rededicates National War Memorial». Toronto Star. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 19.Jump up ^ «National Remembrance Day Ceremony 2007». Royal Canadian Legion. Archived from the original on 25 May 2008. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 20.Jump up ^ Carr, Chris (11 November 2010). «Thousands gather for Remembrance Day ceremony in Saskatoon». StarPhoenix. Retrieved 11 November 2010.[dead link] 21.Jump up ^ «R-03-2001: A Resolution to designate the 3rd of September each year as «Merchant Navy Day»». Company of Master Mariners of Canada. Archived from the original on 14 April 2009. Retrieved 7 August 2014. 22.Jump up ^ «Remembrance day commemorated in Bangalore | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis». Dnaindia.com. 12 November 2012. Retrieved 18 May 2014. 23.Jump up ^ Centenary Digital. «Delhi War Cemetery marks Remembrance Day 2013». Centenarynews.com. Retrieved 18 May 2014. 24.Jump up ^ Nelson, Dean (10 November 2013). «Prince of Wales commemorates Remembrance Sunday in India». The Telegraph. Retrieved 5 September 2015. 25.Jump up ^ «New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage: Anzac Day». Mch.govt.nz. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 26.Jump up ^ «NZ Returned Services Association: Poppy Day». Rsa.org.nz. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 27.Jump up ^ Helen Robinson, ‘Lest we Forget? The Fading of New Zealand War Commemorations, 1946–1966’, New Zealand Journal of History, 44, 1 (2010). 28.Jump up ^ «Cenotaph war memorial restored in time for Remembrance Day». City of Cape Town. 28 October 2013. Archived from the original on 2 August 2014. Retrieved 2 August 2014. 29.Jump up ^ «About the South African Legion». SA Legion. Retrieved 3 August 2014. 30.^ Jump up to: a b Hall, Robert (11 November 1999). «UK War dead remembered». BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 31.Jump up ^ Anon. «The Royal Borough remembers — Remembrance Day and Armistice Day arrangements». The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead. Retrieved 6 February 2015. 32.Jump up ^ «War dead remembered». BBC. 11 November 1999. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 33.Jump up ^ Barrow, Mandy. «Remembrance Day in Britain». Woodlands Junior School. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 34.Jump up ^ Darrell. «The Remembrance Day 2014 Alderney £5 Brilliant Uncirculated Coin». The Royal Mint. 35.Jump up ^ Helen Robinson, ‘Remembering War in the Midst of Conflict: First World War Commemorations in the Northern Irish Troubles’, 20th Century British History, 21, 1 (2010). 36.Jump up ^ «Bermuda Online honors Bermuda’s war veterans». 37.Jump up ^ Jean-Baptiste Duroselle, La Grande Guerre des Français 1914–1918 (The Great War of the French 1914–1918), Perrin, 2002 38.Jump up ^ Les lieux de mémoire (Places of Memory), under the direction of Pierre Nora, Gallimard, Paris, 1997, 3 volumes 39.Jump up ^ «Anerkendelse er mere end en flagdag | Arbejderen» (in Danish). Arbejderen.dk. Retrieved 18 May 2014. 40.Jump up ^ «Germany declines armistice day invite». BBC News. 4 November 1998. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 41.Jump up ^ «Address by Mayor Hans Schaidinger for Volkstrauertag 2008». Website of the Regensburg Rathauser. 16 November 2008. Retrieved 11 November 2011. Unter den Linden Memorial, Regensburg city park, 11.45], «Seit genau 56 Jahren begehen die Menschen in Deutschland nun schon, immer am vorletzten Sonntag des Kirchenjahres – zwei Sonntage vor dem 1. Advent – den Volkstrauertag.» 42.Jump up ^ Alan Cowell and Steven Erlanger (11 November 2009). «France and Germany Use the Remembrance of a War to Promote Reconciliation». New York Times. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 43.Jump up ^ «Northern Ireland honours war dead». BBC News. 11 November 2001. Retrieved 10 April 2010. 44.Jump up ^ 9 November 2003 – 11:09:32 (18 February 2008). «President to attend Remembrance Day ceremony in Dublin». BreakingNews.ie. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 45.Jump up ^ [1] Archived 8 January 2009 at the Wayback Machine. 46.Jump up ^ «North and South of Ireland fighting the Taliban together». Belfasttelegraph.co.uk. 47.Jump up ^ Bootcamp Ireland (6 September 2008). «Irish soldier killed in bomb blast told of Afghan fears – National News, Frontpage». Independent.ie. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 48.Jump up ^ Self-catering (18 October 2008). «The Irish recruits who fight for Queen and country – Jobs & Careers, Lifestyle». Independent.ie. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 49.Jump up ^ «Defence Act, 1954». Irishstatutebook.ie. 13 May 1954. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 50.Jump up ^ «Taxpayers’ money used for British Army recruitment in Limerick». An Phoblacht. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 51.Jump up ^ «Department of Taoiseach». Taoiseach.gov.ie. Retrieved 23 February 2011. 52.Jump up ^ «4 novembre 2010 – Giorno dell’Unità Nazionale Giornata delle Forze Armate». Retrieved 11 November 2011. 53.Jump up ^ «From the Italian government website» (PDF). Governo.it. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 March 2009. Retrieved 23 February 2011.

References Edit

Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association Commemoration – Red poppies Royal Canadian Legion Returned & Services League of Australia South African Legion Canadian Poppy Coin

External links Edit

Annual Sikh Remembrance Day Service

Remembrance Day Single Remember Poppy Day by Olly Wedgwood Remembrance Day For All – Towards discussion that includes everyone in our Remembrance of Canada’s wars. The Poppy Appeal (Royal British Legion) Memorable Order of Tin Hats (South Africa) Free On-line Remembrance Day and Remembrance Week Lessons for Canadian Educators (Reading and Remembrance)

Remembrance Day 2020

Remembrance Day, also known as Armistice Day or Poppy Day, is technically meant to honor the end of World War One, which occurred at 11am on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. But Remembrance Day has long been a time to pay respect to the fallen from all wars. Traditions used to observe Remembrance Day include the wearing of poppies, and a two-minute silence at 11 AM on the eleventh day of the eleventh month. Although Veterans Day is observed in the U.S. on November 11, Remembrance Day functions elsewhere in the world more closely related to Memorial Day in May.

Remembrance Day will on be on Monday, November 11, 2020.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Angela Lorden.

When Did The First Moment of Silence Occur?

It is said that the first moment of silence associated with Remembrance Day was a tradition adopted by British military members stationed in South Africa in 1918. There was one minute of silence to honor the fallen, and one to honor those who had returned.

This tradition was relayed back to Britain, and one year after the end of World War One, King George V held a similar two minute silence. He intended it as a public moment so “the thoughts of everyone may be concentrated on reverent remembrance of the glorious dead” according to an article published on the BBC official site.

Are There Two Remembrance Days?

Remembrance Day is honored in many countries around the world, but in some areas (including Britain and other “Commonwealth countries”) there is also “Remembrance Sunday” held each year on the Sunday nearest to November 11.

Remembrance Day in Canada

Remembrance Day in Canada is celebrated in the following ways:

  • Remembrance Day is recognized as national holiday
  • Leading up to Remembrance Day many people wear artificial poppies.
  • Special church services are held which often includes the playing of “The Last Post” or the 4th verse of the “Ode of Remembrance”
  • Two minutes of silence is held at 11:00 a.m. during most services and ceremonies
  • Wreaths are laid at local war memorials
  • National War Memorials have official ceremonies
  • Many people lay poppies, letters and photographs on the tomb
  • It varies by province in how the holiday is observed

Why Are Poppies Worn On Remembrance Day?

The poppy grew into a symbol of the fallen thanks to the poetry of a Canadian military physician, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae. He wrote In Flanders Fields, which includes the following:

In Flanders fields the poppies grow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago


Photo by Capt. Keenan Kunst.

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

According to the British Legion official site, “Bright red Flanders poppies (Papaver rhoeas) however, were delicate but resilient flowers and grew in their thousands, flourishing even in the middle of chaos and destruction”.

These flowers definitely left an impression on Lt. Col. McCrae, and his poetry inspired an American named Moina Michael, “to make and sell red silk poppies which were brought to England by a French woman, Anna Guérin.”

The British Legion reports that in present times, the use of the poppy doesn’t just honor the fallen, but in some cases it also employs many disabled service members. “Over 5 million Scottish poppies (which have four petals and no leaf unlike poppies in the rest of the UK) are still made by hand by disabled ex-Servicemen at Lady Haig’s Poppy Factory each year”.

Today, the American Legion and many other organizations also use the poppy in fundraising and awareness efforts associated with Remembrance Day.

Quotes for Canadian Remembrance Day

Honoring Those Who Gave Their Lives Serving Canada

In 1915, Canadian soldier John McCrae who’d served in the Second Battle of Ypres in Flanders, Belgium, wrote a poem called «In Flanders Fields» in remembrance of a fallen comrade who’d died in battle and was buried with a simple wooden cross as a marker. The poem describes similar graves throughout the fields of Flanders, fields that once alive with red poppies, now filled with the bodies of dead soldiers. The poem also highlights one of the ironies of war—that soldiers must die so that a nation of people might live.

Commemorating Canada’s As is the case with most of the British Commonwealth countries, Remembrance Day in Canada is celebrated on November 11. To mark the occasion, Canadians observe a minute of silence and visit memorials to honor the soldiers sacrificed their lives for their country. The poppy symbolizes Remembrance Day and is often worn as a sign of respect. At the National War Memorial, a ceremony is held to commemorate the soldiers. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is also an important landmark where people gather to honor the dead.

Canada has always been known for its peaceful people, vibrant culture, and beautiful countryside. But even more than that, Canada is known for its patriotism. On Remembrance Day, take a moment to salute those patriotic men and women who served their nation by reading some of the quotes below.

Remembrance Day Quotations

«In Flanders Fields, the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.»
—John McCrae

«The dead soldier’s silence sings our national anthem.»
—Aaron Kilbourn

«But the freedom that they fought for, and the country grand they wrought for, is their monument today, and for aye.»
—Thomas Dunn English

«And they who for their country die shall fill an honored grave, for glory lights the soldier’s tomb, and beauty weeps the brave.»
—Joseph Drake

«Patriotism is not dying for one’s country, it is living for one’s country. And for humanity. Perhaps that is not as romantic, but it’s better.»
—Agnes Macphail

«I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.»
—John Diefenbaker

«Our hopes are high. Our faith in the people is great. Our courage is strong. And our dreams for this beautiful country will never die.»
—Pierre Trudeau

«Whether we live together in confidence and cohesion; with more faith and pride in ourselves and less self-doubt and hesitation; strong in the conviction that the destiny of Canada is to unite, not divide; sharing in cooperation, not in separation or in conflict; respecting our past and welcoming our future.»
—Lester Pearson

«Canadian nationalism is a subtle, easily misunderstood but powerful reality, expressed in a way that is not state-directed—something like a beer commercial or the death of a significant Canadian figure.»
—Paul Kopas

«We only need to look at what we are really doing in the world and at home and we’ll know what it is to be Canadian.»
—Adrienne Clarkson

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