Section 5.17. Work without a work permit R186(p) Канада


Workers

A foreign national in Canada may be authorized to work without a work permit or may be authorized to work by the issuance of a work permit. Immigration Rules define Work as an activity for which wages are paid or commission is earned, or that competes directly with activities of Canadian citizens or permanent residents in the Canadian labour market.

Requirements: how to obtain a work permit?

You must demonstrate that you meet the requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Regulations and that you will be in Canada for a temporary stay. You must also:

  • satisfy an officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your employment,
  • show that you have enough money during your stay in Canada to take care of yourself and your family members and to return home,
  • be law-ab >

Please note that this rule has been repealed: see New Rules for Temporary Foreign Workers

Starting on April 1, 2011, you will be able to work in Canada for a maximum period of four years. Therefore, you will need to start counting the time you work in Canada as of April 1, 2011. However, there are some exceptions to this rule if:

  • the work you intend to do in Canada creates or maintains significant social, cultural or economic benefits or opportunities for Canadian citizens or permanent residents,
  • the work you intend to do in Canada relates to an international agreement between Canada and one or more countries (including seasonal agricultural workers),
  • your work is done while you are authorized to study,
  • 48 months have passed since you accumulated 4 years of work in Canada.

If you do not work during the entire specified period on your work permit (for example you have a work permit valid for four years and you are sick or you leave temporarily Canada), you may need to submit proof of time not worked when you apply for another work permit later on and you are close to the four-year maximum. Examples of proof documents include but are not limited to:

  • passport entry and exit stamps,
  • Record of Employment from Service Canada,
  • receipt of severance pay,
  • letter from a foreign educational institution where you attended school,
  • travel receipts (tickets, boarding passes),
  • proof of receipt of maternity/parental benefits,
  • letter from physician confirming you were on medical leave,
  • any other document that demonstrates that you were not working in Canada while on a work permit.

A Labour Market Opinion Assessment (LMIA) is the opinion provided by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) to the officer which enables the officer to determine whether the employment of the foreign worker is likely to have a positive or negative impact on the labour market in Canada. An LMIA may be required in order for a work permit to be issued.

The LMIA process begins by the prospective employer submitting an LMIA application to the HRSDC. The HRSDC will consider several factors, including the availability of Canadians and the offered wages as well as the economic benefit the foreign worker would bring to Canada. HRSDC will then provide its opinion to the IRCC.

The LMIA is typically given for a specific period of time, and the work permit issued will coincide with that period. Renewal of a work permit beyond the specified period will likely require a new LMIA.

Effective April 1, 2011, HRSDC/SC will add the following evaluations to the LMIA process:

  • assessment of the genuineness of the offer of employment and
    whether or not, over the past two years, employers who have hired foreign workers, provided wages, working conditions and employment in an occupation that were substantially the same as those listed in the offer of employment.

You may not need a work permit if you fall into one of the following categories:

  • R186(a)—Business visitor
  • R186(b)—Foreign representatives
  • R186(c)—Family members of foreign representatives
  • R186(d)—Military personnel
  • R186(e)—Foreign government officers
  • R186(f)—On-campus employment
  • R186(g)—Performing artists
  • R186(h)—Athletes and coaches
  • R186(i)—News reporters, media crews
  • R186(j)—Public speakers
  • R186(k)—Convention organizers
  • R186(l)—Clergy
  • R186(m)—Judges, referees and similar officials
  • R186(n)—Examiners and evaluators
  • R186(o)—Expert witnesses or investigators
  • R186(p)—Health care students
  • R186(q)—Civil aviation inspector
  • R186(r)—Aviation accident or incident inspector
  • R186(s)—Crew
  • R186(t)—Emergency service providers
  • R186(u)—Implied status

For all other types of work, you must apply for a work permit which either requires LMIA (R203) or is LMIA exempt (R204, R205, R206, and R207).

For further information or questions regarding Work Permits, LMIA and Arranged Employment Opinions, please feel free to contact our office. If you would like to know whether you could be eligible to immigrate to Canada, we invite you to complete our online assessment questionnaire: On-line Assessment Questionnaire.

FW 1 Temporary Foreign Worker Gu >

    Derek Taylor 3 years ago Views:

1 Updates to chapter What this chapter is about Program objectives The Act and Regulations Required forms Instruments and delegations Departmental policy Overview Work without a work permit R186(a) Business visitor Work without a work permit R186(b) Foreign representatives Work without a work permit R186(c) Family members of foreign representatives Work without a work permit R186(d) Military personnel Work without a work permit R186(e) Foreign government officers Work without a work permit R186(f) On-campus employment Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing artists Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and team members Work without a work permit R186(i) News reporters, media crews Work without a work permit R186(j) Public speakers Work without a work permit R186(k) Convention organizers Work without a work permit R186(l) Clergy Work without a work permit R186(m) Judges, referees and similar officials Work without a work permit [R186(n)] Examiners and evaluators Work without a work permit R186(o) Expert witnesses or investigators Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students Work without a work permit R186(q) Civil aviation inspector Work without a work permit R186(r) Aviation accident or incident inspector Work without a work permit R186(s) Crew Work without a work permit R186(t) Emergency service providers Work without a work permit R186(u) Implied status Application for a work permit on entry R Application for a work permit after entry R Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R Work permits exempt from an LMO (Exemption codes) Agreements R Canadian interests: Significant benefit Overview R205(a) Canadian interests: Significant benefit General guidelines R205(a), C Canadian interests: Significant benefit Entrepreneurs/self-employed candidates seeking to. operate a business R205(a), C Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C Canadian interests: Significant benefit Emergency repair personnel R205(a), C Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment, General guidelines R205(b), C Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment International Experience Canada (IEC) (formerly known as the International Youth Programs and International Exchange Programs) R205(b). C Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment Academic exchanges R205(b), C Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment General examples R205(b), C Work related to a research, educational or training program R205(c)(i), C Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii) Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C Self-support R Applicants in Canada R Humanitarian reasons R LMO Validity and Duration of Employment as per the LMO Processing temporary foreign workers Documents required with application Procedure: Assessing temporary foreign workers Individuals named in an immigration warrant of 191

2 8.2. Strike Situations R200(3)(c) Assessing Language Requirements Assessing medical requirements Occupations in which the protection of public health is essential R30(1)(b) Six-month rule R30(1)(c) Foreign nationals who are medically inadmissible may be admissible as temporary residents At the POE Conditions related to medical status In-Canada extension requests Medical surveillance Refugee claimants R30(1)(e) Medical coding Open work permit Types of open work permits Who can be issued an open work permit? Conditions, including validity period What should the validity period be? Categories of work with validity periods which may not be exceeded Quebec program Canada-Quebec Accord Joint undertaking on temporary foreign workers CAQ requirement Issuance of CAQs Joint confirmation procedures Countries served by MICC More guidelines for unique situations Airline personnel Camp counsellors Camp counsellors in training Foreign camp owner or director Fishing guides Oceans Act United States government personnel Rail Grinder Operators, rail welders or other specialized track maintenance workers Foreign Freelance Race Jockeys (working in western provinces only) Appendix A : Artistic/Performing Arts Appendix B : International Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) Appendix C : Foreign Representatives, Family Members and Domestic Workers Appendix D : General Agreement on Trade in Service (GATS) Appendix E : International Experience Canada C Appendix F : Military Personnel and family members Appendix G : North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Appendix H : Sales Appendix I : Guide to Mergers and Acquisitions Appendix J : Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Units Appendix K : Sample letter Insurance Bureau of Canada Appendix L : Sample letter Provincial authority under R204(c) to select a TFW of 191

3 Updates to chapter Listing by date: General revisions throughout the chapter include: Inserted appropriate OB and Manual links. Section 5.1 Overview Added guidance from OB 503 for officers assessing volunteer work on farms. Section 5.2 Business visitors Added hyperlink to OP11, section 5.6 Section Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and team members Added reference to section 13.9 to bullet on jockeys racing horses from foreign-based stables Section Work without a work permit R186(k) Convention organizers Added clarification to the text Section Work without a work permit R186(s) Crew Under Unique circumstances section, added hyperlink after the word exemptions in first sentence to article of the Canada Transportation Act. Added a TIP to the section on Maritime Travel on who is considered crew on various types of vessels. Under Highway section, first bullet under Considerations, added clarification. Section 5.22 Work without a work permit R186(u) — Implied Status Added link to CIC website for more information on implied status. Section Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Changed end date for Group of Employers Pilot to December 31, 2014 Section 5.27 Agreements- R204 Moved first portion of text that was under the heading Agreements not listed in the table below to the end of the table as a Note ; and moved the second portion of that text as a Note under the heading Canada-International Trade Agreements-R204(a) T11; In the Canada-International Non-Trade Agreements table, for the Canada-Bermuda MOU and the Malaysia Professional Accounting Trainees, second bullets, exchanged the word appropriate for eligible in speaking about Canadian post-secondary institutions. Removed Churchill research Range from the table as it is no longer valid. Inserted part of Note from Section 5.38, in regard to spouses and common-law partners of work permit holders who are provincial nominees, with the Notes in section titled 2. Foreign Worker Nominated by a Province or Territory (PNP); Removed chart outlining various pilot programs currently underway and their application deadlines under section titled 3. Provincial/Territorial Programs and Pilots related to TFW annexes R204(c) — T13, and added a link to the webpage with same information. Section 5.31 Canadian interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C of 191

4 Added guidance under the section titled Recaptured Time. Section Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment, General guidelines R205(b), C20 Added link to the Canada World Youth Programs webpage Section 5.38 Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii) Section A Section A: Clarified that the spouse is applying for the C41 exemption; and deleted part of the Second note that was too wordy ; Section F: Added clarification at the end of 4 th bullet, under requirements for the official letter of employment from the university; and removed the text that said officers should not be concerned with the source of remuneration. Section Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C50 Added a TIP regarding the C50 exemption and whether it is mandatory for the organization to be registered as a CRA charitable organization. Section Self-support R206 Updated text in first paragraph; Reworded paragraph under heading titled What is the meaning of unenforceable removal order? ; Added IRPR regulatory references in section titled Medical results. Section 5.42 Humanitarian reasons R208 In section titled Eligibility, added reference to section 10.1 for information about medicals. Section 10.1 Types of open work permits Added IRPR regulatory reference at the end of opening paragraph. Section United States government personnel In the paragraph beginning with Notation to be included. removed text. on a permanent basis. Appendix C — Foreign Representatives, Family Members and Domestic Workers Added link to ENF4 for instructions on how to process initial entry. Appendix F Military Personnel and family members Under the heading titled Other Canadian military training offered to non-vfa countries, hyperlinked ITP reference to Royal Canadian Airforce website. Appendix H Sales Added clarification to the text under the heading Event Planners for a Canadian Organization ; and clarified that C10 is the LMO exemption code referred to under headings Setting up display and Contract Service Providers (re: supervisory personnel) General revisions throughout the chapter include: (French version only) Where conjoints was used when referring to spouses, it was replaced by époux and/or époux et conjoints de fait. Section 5.13 Work with a work permit R186(l) — Clergy of 191

5 Moved text, incorporated from OB 29, that had been moved to Section 5.39 in error with the heading Processing work permit applications from religious workers (that is clergy, ministers, priests) back to this section. Section 5.31 Canadian interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Added clarification in the text under the heading Recaptured time stating that documented time spent not working can either be while inside Canada or outside Canada. Section 5.39 Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C50 Moved text, that was moved in error, back to Section (See Section 5.13 above). Section Who can be issued an open work permit? Added a new bullet in regard to OB 485 Bridging Open Work Permits for Certain Federal Economic Class Applicants. Appendix E International Experience Canada C21 Updates to tables Section 5.27 Agreements R204 FRENCH VERSION ONLY Revised information under sub-section 2.Foreign Worker Nominated by a Province or Territory (PNP) regarding the requirement for a letter from the provincial or territorial government, to be consistent with the English version. Section 9.1 Occupations in which the protection of public health is essential R30(1)(b) Removed the more than three hours per day condition associated with occupations that bring the worker into close contact with people to be consistent with recent change to OP 15, Appendix A. Appendix C Diplomats Title of appendix changed to Foreign Representatives, Family Members and Domestic Workers ; Updates made throughout, including revised guidelines on the employment of domestic workers in private households. Appendix E International Experience Canada C21 Updates to tables. Appendix G North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Clarification regarding pilot car drivers in Section 2.7 under Distribution Section Required forms Updated table to indicate that form IMM 1249 (for visitors, students and workers) has been replaced by IMM5710 (for workers). Section Work without a work permit R186(a) Business visitor Added and foreign government officials not accredited to Canada to the end of the first paragraph; and a note for business visitors about what documents they need to present to CBSA. Added more clarification regarding after-sales and lease arrangements. Section Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing artists Expanded guidance for the bullet pertaining to the exemption for artists attending or working at a showcase of 191

6 Removed exotic/erotic dancers working in a bar or club from the table under the Work permit and LMO required column (OB 449). Section Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and Coaches Changed title of section to Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and team members Added clarification that the exemption does not apply only to athletes and coaches, but also to other essential members of a team (OB 399). Moved the text under the heading Professional and semi-professional coaches and athlete to section 5.33, reciprocal employment. Section Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students Clarification added about medical students performing internships in Quebec. Section Work without a work permit R186(s) Crew General clarifications inserted in the first paragraph. Section 5.21 Work without a work permit R186(t) Emergency service providers Added reference to new Appendix K for sample of IBC letter, to second paragraph under Foreign Insurance Adjusters heading. Section Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Update to section on Information technology (IT) workers as per OB 225-F. Section 5.27 Agreements R204 In the table under Canada-International Non-Trade Agreements R204(a) T11, added NPAFC and NAFO to PICES as marine scientific research organizations of which Canada is a member. In sub-section titled Canada-Provincial/Territorial Agreements R204(c), T13, under the heading Role of the provinces/territories, added a reference to new Appendix L which contains a sample letter a province might issue a foreign national; Under sub-section 2.Foreign Worker Nominated by a Province or Territory (PNP), inserted link to OP7b; added Quebec to the examples of provinces without nominee agreements; added reference to OB 406 Opportunities Ontario PNP initiative allowing open work permits for Master s and PhD graduates who are nominees in Ontario; as well as reference to QC initiative for certain CSQ holders. Updated sub-section titled Provincial/Territorial Programs and Pilots related to TFW Annexes R204(c) T13, and indicated that the Ontario Pilot for foreign spouses and dependent children of certain returning Canadians or Permanent Residents has been extended to May 24, 2013, and the Alberta occupation-specific pilot application period is being expanded and extended to July 31, 2013, and the Alberta and Ontario pilots for working-age dependents of skilled TFWs has been extended for one year and other Alberta and Ontario pilots have been extended for one year. Section Canadian interests: Significant benefit General guidelines R205(a), C10 Added a new bullet/example under the heading Objective measures for significant social or cultural benefit. Section Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Under A) General, moved reference to the GATS from the second bullet to the first bullet for clarification; of 191

7 Fourth bullet under General Requirements, clarified that by contract means directly with the company, and the requirement of a three-year period immediately preceding the date of initial application; Added clarification to A) General/general requirements, E)Other requirements/documentation requirements, and within the table at the end of the section that the foreign national must be currently employed by the enterprise outside Canada that plans to transfer him or her; also added initial to any phrases stating continuously for one year within the three-year period immediately preceding the date of initial application. Section Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment, C20 General guidelines R205(b) Expanded the guidance on the requirements and assessments of reciprocal agreements. Inserted text regarding Professional and semi-professional coaches and athletes moved from Section 5.9. Moved additional examples from Section 5.36 to this section. Section 5.36 Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment General examples, R205(b), C20 Moved examples to Section Section Work related to a research, educational or training program R205(c)(i), C30 Additional guidance added to the bullets under the heading Career colleges and language schools. Section Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii) Added information under heading A. Spouses or common-law partners of skilled workers C41 for spouses of Post-Graduation Work Permit holders; and in the Note regarding open work permit issuance for spouses or common-law partners of nominated foreign nationals. Section 8 Procedure: Assessing temporary foreign workers Updated flowchart. Section Who can be issued an open work permit? Added persons working in an occupation specified by a province to the text in the last bullet; Section Categories of work with validity periods which may not be exceeded Live-In Caregiver Program maximum validity of a work permit revised to four years. Appendix B — International Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) Updated with new section for Canada-Colombia FTA, incorporating OB 342 info. Appendix C Diplomats Additional guidance added to third paragraph of sub-section 2. Foreign government officials not accredited to Canada regarding government officials seeking to meet with foreign partners for meetings, and what documents need to be presented to CBSA. Updated Live-In Caregiver Program sub-section, and added a reference to OB 370. Appendix G North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Clarification added to 4.1 and 4.3 of subsection on Intra-company transferees, that the foreign national must be currently employed by the company that plans to transfer him or her. Appendix J — Temporary Foreign Worker Units Updated this appendix. Appendix K Sample letter Insurance Bureau of Canada (NEW) of 191

8 Sample letter that Insurance Bureau of Canada would provide upon request, to facilitate Canadian insurance providers in obtaining the assistance of outside (foreign) adjustors and their requests for authorization to work in Canada. Reference in Section 5.21 of this manual. Appendix L — Sample letter Provincial authority under R204(c) to select a TFW (NEW) Sample letter that a province can provide to a foreign national selected under R204(c), to attach to a work permit application General revisions throughout the chapter include: All references to the Computer Assisted Immigration Processing System (CAIPS) have been replaced by Global Case Management System (GCMS). Section 3.1 Required forms Update as per OB 270 new Application for a Work Permit (IMM 1295); 1295B is no longer available at most overseas missions. Section 5.1 Examples of activities for which a person would not normally be remunerated. Clarification that work on a farm that is expected to extend beyond four weeks would require a work permit. Section Work without a work permit R186(a) Business visitor Under General Criteria, second bullet, replaced the word commercial with the word business. Added. and trainees to the heading Trainers. Section Work without a work permit R186(e) Foreign government officers Added two new policy sections for American Cross-Border Maritime Law Enforcement Officers and In-Flight Security Officers (IFSOs). Section 5.8 Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing artists Expanded eighth bullet on left-hand column to include visual artists coming to create or display their own work ; Provided examples of a rodeo side show worker in right-hand column of the table;. Under heading Documentation and fees removed the first two sentences referring to IMM 0060 form as this information is not current. Section Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students Removed second paragraph and replaced first note with new note regarding foreign medical residents and medical fellows covered under new exemption code C45 (section 5.38). Section 5.20 Work without a work permit R186(s) — Crew Updated as per OB 214 clarification and instructions regarding vessel crew members (see new Maritime Travel section); Replaced International Trucking and Corporate Aircraft headings with new expanded policy and new headings Maritime Travel, Air Travel, Highway and Rail. Section Work without a work permit R186(t) Emergency service providers Updated agreement and information regarding foreign insurance adjusters. Section 5.25 Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Description of the Group of Employers Pilot added; operational instructions shall be contained in OB 181 until pilot is complete; Added clarification on per diems ; of 191

9 Update as per OB 260 regarding changes to IT worker salary ranges effective for applications received on or after February 1, 2011; Update as per OB 225B instructions for employers hiring IT workers in British Columbia. Inserted reference to internal OB 061 in paragraph under heading Cooperation between HRSDC/SC and CIC and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Section Work permits exempt from an LMO (Exemption codes) Updated table R205(c)(ii) (D) and new (F) medical residents and fellows C45. Section 5.27 Agreements R204 Revised Airline Personnel information in table under heading Canada-International Non- Trade Agreements R204(a) T11; Removed Artists Residencies programme between Canada/US/Mexico ; Added. is employed or. in first paragraph under 2. Foreign Worker Nominated by a Province (PNP). Corrected IRPR reference in heading Provincial/Territorial Programs and Pilots related to TFW Annexes to be R204(c). Section Canadian interests: Significant benefit Entrepreneurs/self-employed candidates seeking to operate a business R205(a), C11 Moved notes regarding provincial nominees from under Temporary Residents section to under Permanent Residents section; Under Temporary Residents section, added references to Outfitters section 13.4 and Racing jockeys section Section Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Removed last sentence in second paragraph under A) General Harmonization of IRPA. Removed NAFTA reference ( As in NAFTA, the applicant does not have to be currently an employee of the company that plans to employ them. ) at the end of the first bullet under E) Other requirements, and from table below the section. Added clarification under Breaks in Canadian service, second paragraph, last sentence. Added clarification regarding recaptured time against five and seven year caps under General Requirements, fourth bullet, and at end of section. Clarification added in table under Duration of stay Section Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment, C20 General guidelines R205(b) Additional guidance added to the TIP. Section 5.34 Canadian Experience: Reciprocal employment International Experience Canada (IEC) Updates as per OB 242 added to Role of CBSA officers at POE no longer processing changes to work permits for IEC;. Changes under Application Processing : five new IEC Special Program Codes to replace IYP. Section 5.35 Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment Academic exchanges R205(b) C22 Added clarification of school boards in the first paragraph under the heading Teachers, elementary and secondary after the word school boards ; Deleted last sentence under Visiting professors for clarification. Section 5.37 Work related to research, educational or training program R205(c)(i), C30 In first point after first paragraph, replaced the term extern with medical fellowship ; Moved paragraph below the list of seven criteria to below point number two, as the information does not apply to numbers three to seven; of 191

10 Revised point number seven to expand research chair position eligibility to colleges and CEGEPs. Removed paragraph just above Career colleges and language schools due to new LMO exemption C45 (see section 5.38). Section 5.38 Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii) Clarification under section D. Post-doctoral fellows and award recipients, C44; Clarification under Research award recipients paid by Canadian institutions that work done at an agency associated with an academic institution that awarded the fellowship is acceptable.; Updated as per OB 230 new section F. Foreign Medical (and Dental) Residents and Medical Research Fellows, C45. Section Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C50 In the first bullet after the first two notes, removed the word small before the word stipend for clarification; Corrected the reference of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in the second Note. Section 6 LMO Validity and Duration of Employment as per the LMO Updated as per OB 152 (published September 30, 2010) — clarification under heading LMO Validity regarding concurrent processing. Section 9.1 Occupations in which the protection of public health is essential R30(1)(b) Added physicians working in research fellowship positions to the second diamond bullet. Section 10 Open work permits New third paragraph with information about where a foreign national can apply; In section 10.2, added a new bullet for spouses or dependent children eligible for an open work permit under a TFW Annex to a Federal-Provincial/Territorial Immigration Agreement. Section Categories of work with validity periods which may not be exceeded Additional information regarding recaptured time added to line regarding Intra-company transferees Section Canada-Quebec Accord Updates from OB 287. Section 12.3 CAQ Requirements Updates from OB 287. Section 13.1 Airline personnel Fourth bullet removed e.g. at end of sentence; Removed first diamond bullet under fourth bullet regarding on aircraft R186(s) information. Section 13.4 Foreign camp owner or director Added information from Outfitters OB 303. Section (NEW) Foreign Freelance Race Jockeys (working in western provinces only) Guidelines from OB 298. Appendix E International Experience Class (C21) Changes in Table I (first table); also in table G:Go International and H:SWAP Working Holidays. Appendix F — Military Personnel and family members of 191

11 Revision in first paragraph under Examination procedures, to clarify that only troops seeking entry for six months or more must be issued a visitor record. Appendix G North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Added clarification in section 3.1, third bullet, and in the title of the table in section 3.8, that the degree or certification must be in an educational program related to the field or profession Added reference to section C12 general provisions for ICTs — in section 4.3. Added clarification in the note in section 4.9 of Appendix G to align with general provisions in section 5.31 of the Manual, i.e. minimum period of one year of full-time employment outside Canada must pass after the time cap Section 5.17 Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students Updated section with information on requirements for medical students destined for the province of Quebec and Saskatchewan. Section 5.25 Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Updated as per OB 225A IT workers Section 5.27 Agreements R204 Updated Provincial Programs and Pilots related to TFW Annexes R204(a) T13 section. Section Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Section A, General Requirements, fourth bullet clarification that being employed can mean via payroll or by contract. Section Canadian interests: Significant benefit Emergency repair personnel R205(a), C13 Removed text but only for the period in which the equipment is still under warranty Section Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment International Experience Canada (IEC) R205(b), C21 Under Conditions of work permit added text to clarify that applications to CPC-Vegreville to change conditions may be submitted either online or by mail. Under Application processing, removed the reference to the need for some foreign nationals to apply for a TRV Section 8.2 Strike Situations Added additional information and clarification of R200(3)(c) Appendix D — General Agreement on Trade in Service (GATS) Second paragraph, added reference to Section 5.2 and Clarified section Conditions for Admission pertains to Professionals date This is the sixth update to this chapter bringing all TFW instructions up to date. Section 5.2 Work without a work permit R186(a) Business Visitor: Removed second paragraph under After-Sales Service as it is similar to third paragraph. Moved second example of business visitor from under Not Business Visitors (NAFTA Professionals and Other Service Providers) section up to the end of General Criteria section. Inclusion of rental agreements under After-Sales Service and Warranty or service agreements. Removed some redundancy under Employees of Foreign companies Contracting Canadian Companies. Section 5.8 Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing Artists: of 191

12 Clarification to section Time-Limited Engagement referred to in R186(g)(i). Documentation and fees they are was changed to this is. Section 5.9 Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and coaches: Revisions for better clarification. Section 5.11 Work without a work permit R186(j) Public speakers: Fourth paragraph clarification regarding guest sport instructors coming to teach weekend seminars. Section 5.13 Work without a work permit R186(i) Clergy: Moved text pertaining to Processing work permit applications from religious workers to section Section 5.17 Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students: Clarification in last sentence of first paragraph. Section 5.25 Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203: Moved information on LSP Language Requirements and referenced to new section 8.3. Removed National Confirmation Letters section. Updates from OB 210 included in Information Technology Workers section. Updated text under Cooperation between HRSDC and CIC and Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). Section 5.26 Work permits exempt from an LMO (Exemption codes): Clarification provided in first sentence by changing have to require. Section 5.27 Agreements R204: Clarification provided in section Agreements not listed. Under Work Permit Instructions, provided clarification for last sentence under Extensions 2. Temporary Foreign Worker Nominated by a Province (TFW-PNP) updated last paragraph under Notes. Revised dates for provincial pilots under section Provincial Programs and Pilots related to TFW annexes R204(a) T13. Section 5.30 Canadian interests: Significant benefit entrepreneurs/self-employed candidates seeking to operate a business R205(a), C11. Permanent resident applications clarification in middle of paragraph. Temporary resident applications removed repetitive text in paragraph; clarification added to Note. Removed text under Provincial Nominees heading and added reference to section 5.27 Added new heading for Work Permit Duration. Section 5.31 Canadian interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Added TIP under part A General requirements regarding leniency for previous part-time work. Under E Other requirements, added new second bullet regarding recent corporate acquisitions or mergers, and referenced to Appendix I for more information on ICTs. Simplified table under Comparison of IRPA General Provisions and NAFTA/CCFTA. Section 5.32 Canadian interests: Significant benefit Emergency repair personnel R205(a), C13: Included commercial equipment and clarified period in which the exemption is valid. Section 5.33 Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment, C20 General guidelines R205(b): of 191

13 Added useful TIP. Section 5.34 Canadian interests: reciprocal employment International Experience Class (IEC) (formerly known as the International Youth Programs and International Exchange Programs) R205(b), C21: Entire section updated. Section 5.37 Work related to a research, educational or training program R205(c)(i), C30: Added reference to OP 12, section Added clarification to second Note. Section 5.38 Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii): Removed text under title B — Spouses or common-law partners of foreign students C42 and referenced to OP 12, section Section 5.39 Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C50: Moved text regarding difference between a charitable worker and a volunteer to second paragraph from under heading Work at religious or charitable camps. Inserted text removed from section 5.13 pertaining to Processing work permit applications from religious workers. Section 5.40 Self-support R206: Added new heading Family members with information regarding work permits for family members of refugee claimants. Added reference to section 9 under Medical results heading. Section 5.41 Applications in Canada R207: In second paragraph, added reference to section 10.1 for information on medicals pertaining to open work permits. Section 5.42 Humanitarian reasons R208: Added clarification in second paragraph under Eligibility. Section 6 LMO Validity and Duration of Employment as per the LMO Revised text under headings Applications received past the LMO expiry date and Duration of employment as per the LMO according to updated OB 152. Section 8.1 Individuals named in an immigration warrant: New section Section 8.2 Strike Situations New section as per OB 86. Section 8.3 Assessing Language Requirements: New section as per OB 171. Section 9.1 Occupations in which protection of the public health is essential R30(1)(b): Clarification added to second sentence and first bullet. Section 9.2 Six-month rule R30(1)(c): Clarification added to first sentence. Section 9.4 At the POE: Clarification added to second and third paragraphs of 191

14 Section 11.2 Categories of work with validity periods which may not be exceeded: For Professionals, added note clarifying that there is no limit to number of extensions that can be issued as per Appendix G, section 3.7. Section 13.8 Rail Grinder Operators, rail welders or other specialized track maintenance workers: Added new item under Guidelines for unique situations. Appendix A Artistic/Performing Arts: Second paragraph under Circus performers, starting with Exception: — admitted was changed to authorized to enter Canada. Film and recording studio users — admitted was changed to authorized to enter Canada. Guest artists coming to perform on Canadian television or radio — admitted was changed to authorized to enter Canada. World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) — admitted was changed to authorized to enter Canada. Appendix D General Agreement on Trade in Service (GATS): Replaced the words natural persons in second sentence with individuals. Appendix E International Experience Canada C21: Major revisions and updates to tables. Appendix F Military Personnel and family members: Second paragraph under Military Training Assistance Programme (MTAP) may be admitted was changed to authorized to enter Canada. Appendix G North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA): Added same TIP under section 4.3 as was added to section 5.31 regarding leniency for previous part-time work for intra-company transferees. Added clarification in second paragraph under section 6.2 Investors, to be consistent with changes made in Round 5 for Traders. Appendix H Sales: Direct sales organizations — admitted was replaced with authorized to enter Canada This is the fifth of several updates to this chapter which will bring all TFW instructions together. Section 5.8 Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing artists FRENCH VERSION ONLY: Changed réalisateurs de film to producteurs de films for consistency with Appendix A. Section 5.9 Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and coaches Under Professional and semi-professional coaches and athletes, removed reference to outdated North American Soccer League and replaced with more current Canadian Soccer League and Major League Soccer leagues. Deleted Professional and Semi-professional Referees text and moved it to section 5.14 as it fits better under R186(m). Section 5.10 Work without a work permit R186(i) News reporters, media crews: Removed bullets under headings For North American media crews and For Non-North American media crews pertaining to crew size and length of stay as per OB of 191

15 Section 5.14 Work without a work permit R186(m) Judges and Referees: Changed title of the section to Judges, referees and similar officials. Clarification and additional text regarding officials involved in professional events. Section 5.15 Work without a work permit R186(n) Examiners and evaluators: Added the word university to add clarification. Section 5.23 Application for a work permit on entry R198: In first paragraph under the table, replaced the word should with the word shall to be consistent with IRPR 200(1). Removed the paragraph pertaining to BSO s option to refer cases to CPC-Vegreville if faced with resource and time challenges. Section 5.25 Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203: Removed the Note regarding National Confirmation Letter for Canada Research Chair Positions which was under the heading Information Technology Workers. Section 5.27 Agreements (R204): In the table listing non-trade agreements (R204 T11), added Canada-U.S. Understanding of Arrangement, Telefilm, and U.S. Government Personnel as these were already mentioned elsewhere in the manual as T11 exemption uses. Section 5.31 Canadian Interests: Significant benefit Intra-company transferees R205(a)C12: (A) General/General requirements, fourth bullet added info on maximums as a reminder when processing extensions. Section 5.34 Canadian interests: Reciprocal Employment International Youth Programs R205(b) C21: Name of program changed to International Experience Canada (IEC). See also changes to tables in Appendix E. Section information updated. Section 5.37 Work related to a research, educational or training program R205(c)(i), C30: Added more info to point number seven, to include holders of CERC positions as well as CRC. Section 5.38 Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii): Item B Eligibility revised to include private institutions in first bullet; in FRENCH version only in Note above Eligibility section, removed the word universitaires ; Item D Post-doctoral fellows and award recipients, C44 added flexibility for applicants whose thesis defence may not be complete, however have still completed the requirements for a Ph.D. Appendix A Artistic/Performing Arts: Sixth bullet updated wording to be more accurate of the R186(i) policy. Under the heading Film Co-Producers, updated the links for Telefilm. Appendix C Diplomats: Under section 5 Family members of foreign representatives in Canada added info on definition of family member and Office of Protocol Circular Note 0643 regarding criteria that must be met by applicants for accreditation. Household Domestic Worker Employment Agreement (HDWEA) circular 2494 replaces circular 579 includes updates to 1.B) Live-In Caregiver Program; new section 13 Method of Payroll Payment; and information about cash payments no longer being accepted. Appendix E International Youth Programs C of 191

16 Name of program (and section) changed to International Experience Canada. See also section 5.34 for text revision. Table updated; SWAP table updated; moved chantiers jeunesse countries under multilateral exchange heading; new program Go International. Appendix G North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA): Section 1.4 What NAFTA does clarification on last bullet for TRV required nationals. Section 3.4 What documentation must a professional present to support an application? Added clarification to ninth paragraph regarding the assessment of qualifications pertaining to the specific job. Section 5 Traders updated for clarity This is the fourth of several updates to this chapter which will bring all TFW instructions together. Section 5.8 Work without a work permit R186(g) Performing Artists Added rodeo contestants to the Entry without a work permit column; added rodeo performers to the Work permit and LMO required column; reformatted a portion of the table for clarification. Section 5.10 Work without a permit R186(i) News reporters Included updates from OB 133 (Foreign Media Crews) in section Media crews on tourism promotional tours Section 5.24 Application for a work permit after entry R199 Added clarification to second bullet. Section 5.25 Work Permits Requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Under LSP Language Requirements, additional text was added to clarify limits when assessing level of ability for the job. Under the Exclusions heading, added a reference to LCP chapters. Section 5.30 Canadian interests: Significant benefit Entrepreneurs/self-employed candidates seeking to operate a business R205(a), C11 Added fourth point under heading Long-term self-employed applicants Added more information regarding partial ownership under the heading Sole or partial ownership Section 5.31 Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 A) General: Clarification added to fourth bullet under General requirements ; added Guidelines for assessing start-up companies» C) Qualifying relationship between the employer and temporary foreign worker added additional information after last line of last paragraph E) Other requirements added clarification to first bullet, i.e. outside Canada Section Public policy, competitiveness and economy R205(c)(ii) (A) Spouses or common-law partners of skilled workers, C41 Clarification was added to the fourth bullet, i.e. or plan to physically reside, while working.. Section 6 — Determining the expiry date of work permits relative to dates on LMOs Changed title of section to LMO Validity and Duration of Employment as per the LMO of 191

17 Updates from OB 152 included. Added clarifications to the Example of a case: and removed the words at least to clarify that the work permit will be authorized for a period of 24 months Added tip at end of section on issuing work permits for longer duration periods Appendix C Diplomats Updated the lists under Of the United Nations or any of its agencies, International organizations in which Canada is a member and Other offices. Appendix E International Youth Programs C21 Updated the list to include additional programs under the new Canada-Poland Agreement. Added Canadian UK Exchange (CANUKE) between ASET and CAFCE under Multi-lateral Exchange, International Co-operative Education This is the third of several updates to this chapter which will bring all TFW instructions together. General revisions throughout the chapter include: CEC was changed to LMO exemption or exemption ; HRSDC Confirmation was changed to LMO (Labour Market Opinion); HRCC was changed to Service Canada ; POE officer was changed to BSO (where appropriate); Foreign Affairs was changed to DFAIT ; Emergency Preparedness Canada was changed to Public Safety Canada ; RHN was changed to HMB ; and minor changes were made in sections 5.31, 8, and 11.2 to reflect new FTAs (i.e. Canada- Peru) coming into existence in addition to the NAFTA and CCFTA. Section 5.1 Overview definition of work [R2] Wording was clarified to be consistent with R2 wording. Wages and commissions the first sentence was removed because work was already defined above. Section 5.9 Work without a work permit R186(h) Athletes and Coaches Clarification was added that the Major Junior A league is also considered amateur. Section 5.17 Work without a work permit R186(p) Health care students Links were added to OP 11, Section 9 and OP 15 to the note at the end of the section. Section 5.20 Work without a work permit R186(s) Crew A heading and text was added for Corporate Aircraft. Section 5.23 Application for a WP on entry R198 persons who must apply outside Canada Clarification was added to the second bullet regarding medicals FNs, visa exempt or not, should apply at a visa office if they require a medical (see also section 9.4). Section 5.25 Work permits requiring a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) R203 Updated fifth paragraph and link regarding industry-specific programs with information about Sector Council support. Section 5.26 Work permits exempt from an LMO (Exemption Codes) The table has been updated regarding international agreements and to support the new exemption codes replacing T10 as per OB of 191

18 Section 5.27 Agreements R204 Changes were made to reflect OB 145: provincial authority to select TFWs and other provincial pilots not in place. In addition, FTAs (NAFTA, CCFTA, GATS) were removed from the non-trade agreements table and a new table was created for FTAs, which will also support future FTAs coming into effect. Section 5.31 Canadian Interests: Significant benefit ICTs R205(a), C12 (A) General Requirements — Clarification was added to second bullet; and (F) International Agreements NAFTA/CCFTA was changed to FTA to make it more generic because Chile is no longer the only FTA in place that is similar to the NAFTA. Updated the table to support the implementation of the Canada-Peru FTA. Section 6 — Determining the expiry date of work permits relative to dates on LMOs A note was added that HRSDC is no longer extending LMOs. Section At the POE Clarification was added regarding medicals FNs, visa exempt or not, should apply at a visa office if they require a medical (see also section 5.23). Section 9.6 In-Canada extension requests Removed first paragraph. If no medical is on record from when a POE officer issued a WP, CPC-Vegreville would NOT assume a medical was done, they would request the required medical. Section 10.2 Who can be issued an open work permit? Fixed the link in the last two bullets (changed from section 5.39 to 5.38 ). Section 11.2 Categories of work with validity periods which may not be exceeded Updated the table to support new FTAs coming into effect in addition to the NAFTA and CCFTA. Added Live-In Caregiver Program to the table and inserted a reference to OP 14. Post-graduate employment Added Can be used only once, changed maximum duration to three years and inserted a reference to OP 12. Section 13.7 United States government personnel Updated USINS to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and U.S. Customs to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Appendix B Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement Changed title to International Free Trade Agreements. Revised the appendix and the implementation of the Canada-Peru FTA as per OB 124. Appendix C Diplomats Updated the Canadian Employment Standards table of wages and overtime pay as per DFAIT instructions and updated the References/links at the end of the appendix. Section 3 Private servants of foreign representatives removed the last three paragraphs and inserted references to OP 14 and IP 4. Appendix G NAFTA Section 3.8 Removed an incomplete note concerning the definition of Profession. Section 4.3 Clarified the second bullet point of 191

19 This is the second of several updates to this chapter which will bring all TFW instructions together. Section 3.1 Required forms Removed forms IMM 5581 and IMM 5582 from the list as they have been replaced by the e- application system. Section 5.10 Work without a work permit R186(i) — News Reporters Added an exception for management and clerical personnel of Special Events that are six months or less in duration Section Work without a work permit R186(l) Clergy Corrected section reference from 5.38 to 5.39 Charitable or religious work Section Work permits exempt from LMOs (confirmation codes) — Table Revised text for T21, T22, T23, and T24 to allow for new FTAs Section 5.31 (D) — Canadian Interests: Significant benefit intra-company transferees R205(a), C12 Qualifying job positions Specialized knowledge workers Added helpful tips Section Canadian interests: Reciprocal employment International youth exchange programs R205(b), C21 Changed program name to International Youth Programs Revised by DFAIT Section Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205(d), C50 Incorporated updates from OB 64 Fixed CRA link to charitable organizations Section 13.2 Camp Counsellors Incorporated updates from OB 64 Fixed designated country link Section 13.4 Foreign camp owner or director Re-worded Appendix E International student and young worker employment Changed title to International Youth Programs Revised by DFAIT Appendix G NAFTA section How long can a work permit be issued Incorporated updates from OB 85 (duration of work permit for professionals) This is the first of several updates to this chapter which will bring all TFW instructions together. Section 4.0 Instruments and delegations Reference to IL3 for delegations Section 5.1 Departmental Policy: Overview Amended definition for examples of activities not considered to be work Section 5.7 Departmental Policy: Work without a permit R186 (f) On-campus employment Reference to OP 12, of 191

20 Section 5.17 Departmental Policy: Work without a permit R186 (p) Health care students Clarification on students not included in this exemption Section 5.22 Departmental Policy: Work without a permit R186 (u) Implied status Added reference to OP11, 24 Section 5.25 Departmental Policy: Work permits requiring HRSDC confirmation R203 Modifications to Low Skilled Pilot instructions. Updates from OB 113 incorporated. Section 5.37 Departmental Policy: Work related to a research, educational or training program R205 (c) (i), C30 Modified exclusions as it applies to foreign students Modified definition of foreign nationals in medical training who require work permit and labour market opinion Section 5.38 Departmental Policy: Public policy, competitiveness and economy, R205 (c)(ii) Section C Reference to OP 12, 5.24 Section E Reference to OP 12, 5.23 Section 5.39 Departmental Policy: Canadian interests: Charitable or religious work R205 (d), C50 Further definition of when this exemption applies Section 13.2 More guidelines for unique situations: Camp counsellors Further definition of when this exemption applies Appendix E International Student and Young Worker Employment: Alphabetical List by Country, Alphabetical List by Program, SWAP and WHP Clarifications were made to the Canada-Germany Youth Mobility Programs Appendix E International Student and Young Worker Employment, Alphabetical List by Country Replaced the 12-month validity period with 24 months for the SWAP and WHP programs with Australia. Appendix E International Student and Young Worker Employment, Alphabetical List by Program: SWAP Replaced the 12-month validity period with 24 months for the SWAP program with Australia Replaced the 12-month validity period with six months for the SWAP program with Italy. Appendix E International Student and Young Worker Employment, Alphabetical List by Program: WHP Replaced the 12-month validity period with 24 months for the WHP program with Australia. Replaced the 12-month validity period with six months for the WHP program with Italy. Appendix J Temporary Foreign Worker Units: Expanded Services Added appendix with new information on TFWUs of 191

Jobs That Do Not Require a Work Permit in Canada

A detailed list of all the jobs that a foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit. Foreign workers may seek employment in Canada without a work permit if they work in one of the following jobs(Canadian jobs without work permit):

Military Personnel:

All military personnel who have been given orders to come to Canada do not need a work permit as long as they are serving a country that is designated under the Visiting Forces Act. For a list of these countries, click here.

Note: this work permit exemption applies to military personnel and not “military attachés”, who are employed by diplomatic missions.

Athletes and Team Members:

Foreign-born professional or amateur athletes may participate individually or as a team in Canadian sporting events without having to get a work permit. Coaches, trainers and other important team members are also exempt from the work permit requirement.

Spouses of professional athletes working in Canada must have a work permit but are exempt from the LMIA requirement.

Public Speakers
This category includes: guest speakers for specific events, commercial speakers and seminar leaders. The speaking engagements for all of the above must not last for more than 5 days. The following public speakers, however, must get a work permit and LMIA before entering Canada:

  • Commercial speakers who are hired by a Canadian business to provide training services.
  • Guest athletics instructors coming to teach weekend seminars.

Convention Organizers

Individuals, committees and support staff who are organizing a convention or conference do not need a work permit to work in Canada. Events covered by this exemption include:

    • Association meetings
    • Corporate meetings
    • Trade shows or exhibitions
    • Consumer shows or exhibitions

Note: This exemption does not apply to “hands-on” workers such as those who provide audio-visual services, installation and dismantling services, show decorating services, or exhibit building services.

Further, a convention organizer will have to obtain a work permit if he/she is organizing an event for an organization that:

    • Is actively doing business in Canada
    • Is centered in Canada
    • Has a subsidiary branch in Canada


Clergy

A person will be exempt from the work permit requirement if his/her work consists mainly of: preaching doctrine, presiding at religious events or providing spiritual guidance.

Peoples who do not perform the work above but are engaged in religiously based community service activities must have a work permit but do not need to get a LMIA.

Persons seeking entry to Canada under this category must be able to provide evidence concerning:

    • The genuineness of their offer of religious employment
    • The genuineness of the religious group that is offering the job
    • The ability of the clergyman to perform clerical duties for a congregation of the relevant religious group

Note: In some cases, visa officers may require further evidence in order to assess the genuineness of the religious job being offered.

Judges, Referees and Similar Officials

Judges, referees and similar officials may work in Canada without a work permit if they are involved in:

    • An international amateur sports contest
      • The contest should be organized by an international amateur sporting association and hosted by a Canadian organization.
      • An international cultural or artistic event or contest
      • An animal or agricultural contest

Note: Referees for professional sporting leagues are normally required to obtain a work permit and a LMIA. However, referees in certain professional sports leagues such as the NHL, MLB and NBA are exempt from this requirement due to specific reciprocal agreements between Canada and the USA.

Examiners and Evaluators

Under this category, successful academics that guide students and review their work will be allowed to enter Canada without a work permit in order to review their students’ theses and papers. This group also includes professors and researchers who are entering Canada in order to evaluate academic university programs or research proposals.

Expert Witnesses or Investigators

A worker does not need to obtain a work permit to enter Canada if he/she:

    • Is entering Canada to conduct surveys or analyses that will be used as evidence before a regulatory body, tribunal or court of law
    • Is entering Canada to serve as an expert witness before a regulatory body, tribunal or court of law

Civil Aviation Inspectors

Flight operations inspectors and cabin safety inspectors who enter Canada temporarily while inspecting the safety procedures on commercial international flights are exempt from the work permit requirement. Workers under this group must be employed by a recognized aeronautics safety authority and must have valid documentation establishing that they are aviation inspectors.

Aviation Accident or Incident Inspectors

Accredited representatives or advisors that aid in the investigation of aviation accidents or incidents under the authority of the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act are exempt from the work permit requirement.

Emergency Service Providers

Persons who come to Canada for the purpose of rendering services in times of emergency are exempt from the work permit requirement. These persons may be:

    • Doctors
    • Medical teams
    • Appraisers
    • Provincially licensed insurance adjusters

The emergencies may be medical, industrial, environmental or the result of a natural disaster.

Foreign insurance adjusters must be able to prove that they meet all relevant provincial regulatory requirements in order to be admitted to Canada without a work permit.

Implied Status

Workers may continue working in Canada under the conditions of an expired work permit as long as they have applied for a new permit before the initial work permit expired and still live in Canada. If the new application for a work permit is rejected, the worker will have to leave Canada.

Farm Work

A person may work on a farm without a work permit as long as:

    • The farm work is on a volunteer basis
    • The person’s primary reason for coming to Canada was something other than the farm work (such as tourism or visiting family/friends)00
    • The farm is non-commercial. Non-commercial farms are generally defined as: farms where the owner provides much of the capital and labour for the farm and where the farm produce is used to provide for the basic needs of the owner’s family, with little extra to sell for profit.

Interested employers: Kindly contact us here to receive further information.

Interested candidates: Find out whether you qualify to Canada by completing our free on-line evaluation. We will provide you with our evaluation within 1-2 business days.

Can US permanent res >

Can green card holders (ie permanent resident aliens of the US) work in Canada without any paperwork from Canada?

If not, will the process of acquiring work permits be made easier at least?

Please disregard the NZ. It only shows where I was when I got a Yahoo email address . and nothing else.

3 Answers

If your nick «Down Under Guy» means that you’re from Australia or New Zealand, I believe you have British Commonwealth status that may allow you some sort of easy procedure for Canada.

I would suggest visiting this Canadian government website:

Working in Canada

no foreigner can work with out a visa

a work permit application is processed the same or everyone. living in the US means nothing to Canadian immigration

to get a work permit for Canada you must be skilled and have a job offer

Your status in the US has no impact on your application to work in Canada. Also, being from the Commonwealth does not improve your chances either.

I should also note that in MOST cases you need a work permit to work in Canada, but there are exceptions — see s. 186 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to see if you fit in any of these exceptions:

186. A foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit

(a) as a business visitor to Canada within the meaning of section 187;

(b) as a foreign representative, if they are properly accredited by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and are in Canada to carry out official duties as a diplomatic agent, consular officer, representative or official of a country other than Canada, of the United Nations or any of its agencies or of any international organization of which Canada is a member;

(c) if the foreign national is a family member of a foreign representative in Canada who is accredited with diplomatic status by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and that Department has stated in writing that it does not object to the foreign national working in Canada;

(d) as a member of the armed forces of a country that is a designated state for the purposes of the Visiting Forces Act, including a person who has been designated as a civilian component of those armed forces;

(e) as an officer of a foreign government sent, under an exchange agreement between Canada and one or more countries, to take up duties with a federal or provincial agency;

(f) if they are a full-time student, on the campus of the university or college at which they are a full-time student, for the period for which they hold a study permit to study at that university or college;

(g) as a performing artist appearing alone or in a group in an artistic performance — other than a performance that is primarily for a film production or a television or radio broadcast — or as a member of the staff of such a performing artist or group who is integral to the artistic performance, if


(i) they are part of a foreign production or group, or are a guest artist in a Canadian production or group, performing a time-limited engagement, and

(ii) they are not in an employment relationship with the organization or business in Canada that is contracting for their services, nor performing in a bar, restaurant or similar establishment;

(h) as a participant in sports activities or events, in Canada, either as an individual participant or as a member of a foreign-based team or Canadian amateur team;

(i) as an employee of a foreign news company for the purpose of reporting on events in Canada;

(j) as a guest speaker for the sole purpose of making a speech or delivering a paper at a dinner, graduation, convention or similar function, or as a commercial speaker or seminar leader delivering a seminar that lasts no longer than five days;

(k) as a member of the executive of a committee that is organizing a convention or meeting in Canada or as a member of the administrative support staff of such a committee;

(l) as a person who is responsible for assisting a congregation or group in the achievement of its spiritual goals and whose main duties are to preach doctrine, perform functions related to gatherings of the congregation or group or provide spiritual counselling;

(m) as a judge, referee or similar official at an international amateur sports competition, an international cultural or artistic event or competition or an animal or agricultural competition;

(n) as an examiner or evaluator of research proposals, academic projects or programs or university theses;

(o) as an expert who conducts surveys or analyses that are to be used as evidence before a federal or provincial regulatory body, a tribunal or a court of law or as an expert witness before such a body, tribunal or court of law;

(p) as a student in a health field, including as a medical elective or clinical clerk at a medical teaching institution in Canada, for the primary purpose of acquiring training, if they have written approval from the body that regulates that field;

(q) as a civil aviation inspector of a national aeronautical authority conducting inspections of the flight operation procedures or cabin safety of a commercial air carrier operating international flights;

(r) as an accredited representative or adviser participating in an aviation accident or incident investigation conducted under the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act;

(s) as a member of a crew who is employed by a foreign company aboard a means of transportation that

(i) is foreign-owned and not registered in Canada, and

(ii) is engaged primarily in international transportation;

(t) as a provider of emergency services, including medical services, for the protection or preservation of life or property; or

(u) until a decision is made on an application made by them under subsection 20

Work Permit Regulation 186 Working Without a Work Permit V > Posted in Work Permit Videos

According to certain regulations, there are some exemptions to the requirement of a Work Permit in order to work in Canada. Our video explains regulation 186 and how you might not need a work permit to work in Canada!

Work Permit Regulation 186 Working Without a Work Permit

There are activities in Canada that can be performed, that actually do not require a Work Permit, this means working without a Work Permit. These types of activities are governed under Business Regulation Section 186. So, if you look at that regulation there are general criteria to keep in mind to ensure that you don’t need a Work Permit. These include:

  • No intent to enter the Canadian labour market that is no gainful employment in Canada. So you cannot come to Canada and possibly have a job offer from a Canadian employer.
  • Foreign activities must be international in scope and there is a presumption of the underlying cross border business activities (eg. After Sales Service Agreement)

An example of cross border activity and After Sales Service Agreement would be a Canadian company and an American company have an After Sales Service Agreement and the agreement outlines that the Canadian company has bought this refrigerator from the US. The refrigerator has a warranty agreement of two years or more in which an American technicians would come and train the Canadian technicians for repair in case it breaks down. Usually, an agreement as such would take place when the company that purchased the product in this case the Canadian company has no expertise in this product as the expertise lies outside of Canada. Therefore, the foreign company has the responsibility to ensure they meet the service agreement.

Wage received has to be from outside of Canada- meaning the technicians that come in to fix the product or train the employees, the employees’ salary has to be outside of Canada and the Canadian company cannot compensate the technician for their services. The example of the technician mentioned above, he will come and service the refrigerator for one or two days and then go back to his or her employment in the United States. He has an employer outside of Canada that will pay for his services performed in Canada.

  • occurred profits has to be outside of Canada

If you are travelling to work for Canada and not sure if you require a Work Permit or exempt from it then contact Akrami & Associates today. Our immigrate experts will evaluate your situation and determine if you are exempt or need to apply for a Work Permit.

With Akrami & Associates there is always a way!!

If you like this video please subscribe to our channel!

We hope you enjoy the video!

For more information on Canada Work Permit and many other immigration matters, check out our site:

416 477 2570 | 1 877 622 8182

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Section 5.17. Work without a work permit R186(p) Канада

Visitors to Canada cannot work in Canada without a work permit. Many visitors to Canada want to know if they can volunteer without a work permit. Sometimes the volunteer work involves a barter for services or goods, but not money. IRCC defines work as an activity that you are or could be paid for, and which takes work away from or competes with a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. Because of this, volunteer work, unpaid internships and practicums may also require work permits.

In most cases, it’s a bad idea to volunteer in Canada without a work permit.

My colleague discusses the Juneja case as an example of how trying to avoid the requirement to have a work permit can lead to disastrous results:

In this case, Mr. Juneja entered Canada from India with a valid study permit. He began studying at a college in Edmonton, Alberta. It is important to note that his study permit prohibited any kind of employment.

An individual at Mr. Juneja’s school saw him working at a Ford dealership and contacted authorities. Mr. Juneja was detained and he had a hearing soon after to determine whether or not he could stay in Canada.

If those were the only facts, then this case would be pretty straightforward.

However, Mr. Juneja was not being paid at all. He was not given anything in return for his service. Rather, the Ford dealership was recording his hours, and they agreed that Mr. Juneja would be paid for his services only once he received a work permit in the future.

In essence, he was volunteering his time.

The Court found that Mr. Juneja still violated the conditions of his study permit.

It did not matter that he wasn’t being paid. The Court held that Mr. Juneja was engaged in a “performance of an activity in direct competition with the activities of Canadians and permanent residents in the Canadian labour market.”

In other words, his action of working (even for free for the time being) competed with the ability of citizens and permanent residents to work, which is prohibited under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Mr. Junja was issued an exclusion order to leave Canada.

Tips on Volunteering in Canada Without a Work Permit

Can a temporary resident without a work permit volunteer in Canada? IRCC says that there are some charitable volunteer jobs which are normally not paid, It’s best to seek legal counsel as circumstances can vary considerably.

Here are some general guidelines:

1. If the job is normally a paid position, do not volunteer for it.

If you are an accountant or computer programmer, you shouldn’t normally volunteer those skills, as typically those are paid positions.

Dishing soup in a soup kitchen is normally charity work and not normally a paid position, and you can likely volunteer in the soup kitchen without a permit under the current rules.

2. If the job is not paid but usually leads to a paid position, do not volunteer for it.

There are certain jobs that individuals normally accept with the expectation that it will lead to a paid position. Internships or other training positions may not be paid, but they may be considered to be “in direct competition” with Canadians in the labour market.

3. Do not try to invent clever schemes for alternative payment.

In the Juneja case, Mr. Juneja and the Ford dealership assumed they had avoided the work permit requirement by delaying any actual payment until Mr. Juneja obtained a work permit in the future.

The Court did not accept this. It’s not payment that is key – it’s interfering with a Canadian’s ability to perform that job. Any sort of alternate payment or barter scheme is not allowed.

4. Volunteering on non-commercial farms may not require a work permit if the farm work is not the main reason for entering Canada.

Foreign nationals volunteering on family or hobby farms in exchange for room and board for a period of up to four weeks per host do not require work permits.

5. Foreign students are required to have a work permit.

These exceptions are allowed where a work permit is not required:

  • on-campus employment
  • health care students doing an internship or practicum to acquire training may be unpaid and but not be of more than 4 months’ duration

It’s a good idea to consult an immigration lawyer if you have questions about volunteering in Canada without a work permit.

This post does not constitute legal advice – you should consult with a lawyer so he or she can evaluate your unique circumstances and application materials.

Contact Ackah Business Immigration Law

Calgary: (403) 452‑9515
Vancouver: (604) 985‑9512
Toronto: (416) 643‑7177
North America: 1 (800) 932-1190

Can US permanent res >


Can green card holders (ie permanent resident aliens of the US) work in Canada without any paperwork from Canada?

If not, will the process of acquiring work permits be made easier at least?

Please disregard the NZ. It only shows where I was when I got a Yahoo email address . and nothing else.

3 Answers

If your nick «Down Under Guy» means that you’re from Australia or New Zealand, I believe you have British Commonwealth status that may allow you some sort of easy procedure for Canada.

I would suggest visiting this Canadian government website:

Working in Canada

no foreigner can work with out a visa

a work permit application is processed the same or everyone. living in the US means nothing to Canadian immigration

to get a work permit for Canada you must be skilled and have a job offer

Your status in the US has no impact on your application to work in Canada. Also, being from the Commonwealth does not improve your chances either.

I should also note that in MOST cases you need a work permit to work in Canada, but there are exceptions — see s. 186 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to see if you fit in any of these exceptions:

186. A foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit

(a) as a business visitor to Canada within the meaning of section 187;

(b) as a foreign representative, if they are properly accredited by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and are in Canada to carry out official duties as a diplomatic agent, consular officer, representative or official of a country other than Canada, of the United Nations or any of its agencies or of any international organization of which Canada is a member;

(c) if the foreign national is a family member of a foreign representative in Canada who is accredited with diplomatic status by the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and that Department has stated in writing that it does not object to the foreign national working in Canada;

(d) as a member of the armed forces of a country that is a designated state for the purposes of the Visiting Forces Act, including a person who has been designated as a civilian component of those armed forces;

(e) as an officer of a foreign government sent, under an exchange agreement between Canada and one or more countries, to take up duties with a federal or provincial agency;

(f) if they are a full-time student, on the campus of the university or college at which they are a full-time student, for the period for which they hold a study permit to study at that university or college;

(g) as a performing artist appearing alone or in a group in an artistic performance — other than a performance that is primarily for a film production or a television or radio broadcast — or as a member of the staff of such a performing artist or group who is integral to the artistic performance, if

(i) they are part of a foreign production or group, or are a guest artist in a Canadian production or group, performing a time-limited engagement, and

(ii) they are not in an employment relationship with the organization or business in Canada that is contracting for their services, nor performing in a bar, restaurant or similar establishment;

(h) as a participant in sports activities or events, in Canada, either as an individual participant or as a member of a foreign-based team or Canadian amateur team;

(i) as an employee of a foreign news company for the purpose of reporting on events in Canada;

(j) as a guest speaker for the sole purpose of making a speech or delivering a paper at a dinner, graduation, convention or similar function, or as a commercial speaker or seminar leader delivering a seminar that lasts no longer than five days;

(k) as a member of the executive of a committee that is organizing a convention or meeting in Canada or as a member of the administrative support staff of such a committee;

(l) as a person who is responsible for assisting a congregation or group in the achievement of its spiritual goals and whose main duties are to preach doctrine, perform functions related to gatherings of the congregation or group or provide spiritual counselling;

(m) as a judge, referee or similar official at an international amateur sports competition, an international cultural or artistic event or competition or an animal or agricultural competition;

(n) as an examiner or evaluator of research proposals, academic projects or programs or university theses;

(o) as an expert who conducts surveys or analyses that are to be used as evidence before a federal or provincial regulatory body, a tribunal or a court of law or as an expert witness before such a body, tribunal or court of law;

(p) as a student in a health field, including as a medical elective or clinical clerk at a medical teaching institution in Canada, for the primary purpose of acquiring training, if they have written approval from the body that regulates that field;

(q) as a civil aviation inspector of a national aeronautical authority conducting inspections of the flight operation procedures or cabin safety of a commercial air carrier operating international flights;

(r) as an accredited representative or adviser participating in an aviation accident or incident investigation conducted under the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act;

(s) as a member of a crew who is employed by a foreign company aboard a means of transportation that

(i) is foreign-owned and not registered in Canada, and

(ii) is engaged primarily in international transportation;

(t) as a provider of emergency services, including medical services, for the protection or preservation of life or property; or

(u) until a decision is made on an application made by them under subsection 20

Centre for International Experience

Working in Canada

If you are an international student with full-time registration status and a valid Study Permit, you are eligible to work in Canada, with some conditions.

  1. On-Campus Work
  2. Off-Campus Work
  3. Co-op Work Permit
  4. Post-Graduation Work Permit
  5. Work Permit for a Spouse or Common-Law Partner
  6. Income Tax
  7. Social Insurance Number

Contents

On-campus work

If you are an international student with full-time registration status and a valid Study Permit, you may be eligible to work on campus without a work permit.

Definition of On-campus work:

On-campus work includes any job that is located within the boundaries of the campus. The employer can be the university (for example: library, bookstore, department, registrar’s office, athletic centre, residence…) or a private business located on campus like coffee shops, restaurants or contractors providing services to the university.

Eligibility Criteria:

Per the current immigration regulations, an international student; including exchange, Visiting and ESL students, is eligible to work on campus without a work permit if he/she:

  • has a valid study permit.
  • is enrolled full-time.
  • has a valid SIN (social insurance number)

You must stop working on-campus on the day you no longer meet the above eligibility requirements, e.g., if you are no longer a full-time student.

How many hours can an international student work on campus?

There are no restrictions on the number of hours that an international student can work on campus as long as they meet the eligibility criteria. Students must stop working on-campus on the day they no longer meet the on-campus eligibility criteria.

Working During Regularly Scheduled Breaks:

You may work on campus during scheduled breaks like summer regardless of the number of courses that you enroll in during your scheduled break if you meet the following conditions:

  • The break is officially recognized by your school, department or faculty as a scheduled break.
  • You are enrolled in a degree program.
  • You have been studying full time prior to the scheduled beak.
  • You are returning to study full time after the break (the final term is the only exception to this requirement).

Off-campus work

Who is eligible to work off campus?

You are eligible to work off campus without a work permit if you meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • You hold a valid study permit.
  • You are a full-time student enrolled in a degree program (exception: when you are in the last term of your final year of study, you can work even if you are studying part-time);
  • Your program of study is at least six months or more in duration and one that leads to a degree, diploma or certificate.
  • You have a valid SIN (social insurance number)

You must stop working off campus on the day you no longer meet the above eligibility requirements (e.g., if you are no longer a full-time student.)

You are not eligible to work off campus if:

  • You are a visiting or exchange student
  • You are registered in a general interest program or a non-degree program

  • You are registered in an English or French as a second language (ESL/FSL) program

How many hours can an international student work off campus?

  • If you are eligible to work off campus, you may work up to 20 hours per week during the regular academic year and full time during scheduled breaks (e.g. winter/summer holidays, spring break)
  • If you are enrolled in an intensive program which does not have scheduled breaks, you may only work a maximum of 20 hours per week during the entire program of study

There are no legal restrictions preventing students from working on campus in addition to working the maximum 20 hours per week off campus.

Working During Regularly Scheduled Breaks:

You may work off campus full time during scheduled breaks like summer regardless of the number of courses that you enroll in during your scheduled break if you meet the following conditions:

  • The break is officially recognized by your school, department or faculty as a scheduled break.
  • You are enrolled in a degree program.
  • You have been studying full time prior to the scheduled break.
  • You are returning to study full time after the break (the final term is the only exception to this requirement).

Co-op Work Permit

Work experience is a required component of some programs of study. If you are registered in such a program, you will need a work permit to fulfil this requirement. You can work either on or off campus for a co-op, an internship or for professional experience.

To be eligible for this work permit you must:

  1. Have a valid Study Permit, and
  2. Get a letter from your faculty indicating that employment is an integral part of your degree program.

There is no processing fee for the co-op work permit. Also, the University of Toronto will be listed as the employer. Furthermore, the expiry date of this type of work permit will match the expiry date of your study permit. However, the co-op work permit becomes automatically invalid once you complete your required internship hours/months.

Medical examination

If you are planning to work with children or in the health services field, you must complete and pass a medical examination before submitting your application. Processing can take a while, so you should book your medical examination well in advance. For a complete list of these occupations and a list of Designated Medical Practitioners who can perform the exam, visit the IRCC website. When you submit your work permit application, attach proof that you underwent a medical exam (i.e. a copy of your medical receipt). Failure to do so may result in processing delays or the rejection of your application.

Post-Graduation work permit

The post-graduation employment program provides graduating students with Canadian work experience. Most international students who graduate from the University of Toronto are eligible to apply for a post-graduation work permit with a validity period of up to 3 years – this depends on the length of the student’s program of study.

If the official length of your program of study is:

  • Less than8 months, you are not eligible for this work permit.
  • More than 8 months and up to2 years, you may get a work permit for a period no longer than the length of your program of study (for example, if you studied for nine months, a work permit may be issued for a period of nine months).
  • Two years or more, a work permit may be issued for up to 3 years.

You may apply for this work permit only once. To be eligible, you must:

  • Have completed the requirements of a degree which was at least eight months long.
  • Have maintained full-time status as a student in Canada during each semester of your program of study. Exceptions: if you were not a full-time student during the last semester of your studies, or if you took an authorized leave of less than 150 days.
  • Apply within 180 days from the date your registrar’s office issues your final marks.
  • Provide proof of completion of your program (i.e. a completion of degree requirements letter from your Registrar).
  • Have not previously been issued a Post-Graduation Work Permit.

For detailed information about the eligibility criteria for the post-graduation work permit, visit the Government of Canada website.

NOTE: If you are planning to work with children or in the health services field, you must complete and pass a medical examination before submitting your application. Processing can take a while, so you should book your medical examination well in advance. For a complete list of these occupations and a list of Designated Medical Practitioners who can perform the exam, visit the IRCC website. When you submit your work permit application, attach proof that you underwent a medical exam (i.e., a copy of your medical receipt). Failure to do so may result in processing delays or the rejection of your application.

You are not eligible to apply for a PGWP if you:

  • Completed a program that is less than 8 months long.
  • Have previously been issued a post-graduation work permit.
  • Received funding from Global Affairs Canada (GAC).
  • Took part in the Government of Canada Awards Program funded by GAC.
  • Obtained the Equal Opportunity Scholarship, Canada–Chile.
  • Took part in the Canada–China Scholars’ Exchange Program.
  • Took part in the Organization of American States Fellowships Program.
  • Completed the majority of your courses by distance learning.

Additional information for post-graduation work permit holders:

Members of your immediate family (spouse/common-law partner/dependent children) who wish to remain with you for the duration of your work permit, must apply for permission to do so. You may apply for an extension of their stay in Canada at the same time as you apply for your post-graduation work permit. Make sure you include all appropriate documentation and the required fee for each person in the application.

Work permit for your spouse/common-law partner

Accompanying spouses or common-law partners of foreign students are eligible to apply for an open work permit. No job offer or Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) are required for this work permit when the principal applicant (the international student) has a valid study permit and is enrolled in a program of study. Visit IRCC’s website for more information about this type of work.

Social Insurance Number (SIN)

In order to work in Canada, you must make sure that you:

A Social Insurance Number (SIN) is a 9 digit number that you need in order to work in Canada or to have access to government programs and benefits. You will need a SIN if you want to file an income tax return in Canada. Starting in 2020, the University of Toronto will request your Social Insurance Number on ACORN to include it on the tax forms they issue.

Study Permit holders:

To get a SIN using your study permit, it must include one of the following statements:

  • May accept employment on the campus of the institution at which registered in full-time studies.
  • May work 20 hrs per week off campus or full time during regular breaks if meeting criteria outlined in section 186(v) of IRPR
  • May accept employment on or off campus if meeting eligibility criteria as per R186(f), (v) or (w). Must cease working if no longer meeting these criteria

If your study permit does not have any of the above-mentioned statements, you need to apply for an amendment to your study permit before you can apply for a SIN.

If your study permit has the above-mentioned statements, you will need to take the following to Service Canada to apply for your SIN:

Work Permit Holders:

If you hold a co-op or post-graduation work permit you can take the following documents to Service Canada to get your new SIN or update your current SIN:

  1. Passport
  2. Co-op/Post-Graduation Work Permit

How to get your SIN

Apply for a SIN with your original documents in person at a Service Canada Office. These Service Canada Offices near campus process SIN applications:

  • 559 College Street, Suite 100, Toronto, Ontario
  • 100 Queen Street West, Floor 1, Toronto, Ontario

Additional offices and locations can be found on the Service Canada website

There is no fee for getting your SIN and in most cases the SIN will be given to you when you apply for it.

Your SIN will expire at the same time as your Study Permit or Work Permit. If you would like to renew your SIN, you will need the same documents as you did for the initial application.

Note: Once you have your Social Insurance Number, you must update your profile on ACORN

Income Tax

Income tax and international students

International students have to pay annual income tax for any money they earn while working in Canada. The deadline for filing a tax return is April 30 of each year. For detailed information about your income tax obligations, visit the Canada Revenue Agency website.

CIE general income tax information sessions for international students

Looking for more information about income taxes in Canada? During the Winter Term, the CIE offers information sessions on income taxes in Canada for international students. These sessions are led by a Tax Expert and CIE staff.

Форум Винского

Система поиска дешевых билетов

Бронирование отелей, вилл, апартаментов

Аренда квартир, апартаментов, домов у собственников

Аренда автомобиля в России и за границей

Страхование для туристов

Реклама на форуме Винского

Сайт Винского

  • Список форумовАМЕРИКА форумКАНАДА форумВиза в Канаду: получение канадской визы документы
  • Изменить размер шрифта
  • Smartfeed
  • Блоги
  • Правила
  • Инструкции
  • FAQ
  • Галерея
  • Регистрация
  • Вход

Spouse open work permit. Документы, сроки, советы.

Сейчас этот форум просматривают: нет зарегистрированных пользователей и гости: 4

Аренда автомобиля в Канаде : Поиск и бронирование автомобилей в Rent Car агентствах Канады — всегда лучший выбор автомобилей и цен, к тому же страховка включена
Авиабилеты : Дешевые авиабилеты в Канаду — поверь, что дешевле не найдёшь
Не забудь оформить туристическую страховку : Оформление туристической страховки онлайн быстро и асист вежливый если что-то с тобой случится

Spouse open work permit. Документы, сроки, советы.

mraskc » 26 апр 2020, 19:16

Здравствуйте, форумчане!!
На днях получил паспорт с долгожданным Study permit (Весь процесс начал в феврале 2020 о чем уже готовлю подробный рассказ с деталями об отказах и прочих трудностях с которыми я столкнулся на протяжении всех 4-ех подач).
Сейчас есть недопонимание с OWP для жены — не могу найти ликбез как, через сколько времени, какие документы нужны для того что бы забрать жену. Есть ли тут кто, за плечами которого этот процесс успешно закончен?
Ссылку сюда ( http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/study/work-spouse.asp ) не давайте.

Еще раз. Интересует :
1. Список документов.
2. Через сколько после пересечения мною канадской границы мы можем аплаеться.
3. Возможные подводные камни.

Очень важная для вас статья:  Иммиграционная компания LP Group Канада
Добавить комментарий