Sorry, you are overqualified Канада


Answering Interview Questions About Being Overqualified for a Job

Interviewers will frequently ask applicants if they feel they are overqualified for the job for which they are applying. The interviewer is asking this question because they want to make sure the candidate the decide upon will stay in the position and not hop quickly to a job that better suits their experience, skills, and abilities. Answering this question can be difficult if you have not prepared yourself for it in advance.

Career expert and author, Joyce Lain Kennedy, shares her best job interview answers to the question «Are you overqualified for this job?»

Best Answers to «Are You Overqualified for This Job?»

These examples may help you craft your own answers to this question. Keep in mind that you can customize these answers to fit your particular circumstances and the job you’re applying for.

Joyce Lain Kennedy’s sample answers to the interview question «Are you overqualified for this job?»

Are you overqualified for this position?

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OVERQUALIFIED? UNDERQUALIFIED? НА СВОЕМ МЕСТЕ?

Почти половина всех жителей Канады, согласно опросу, проведенному рекрутской компанией Randstad, считают себя слишком образованными или более квалифицированными, чем требуется для выполнения обязанностей на их сегодняшнем рабочем месте.

Так полагают порядка 44% участников опроса. Однако 20% чувствуют, что недостаточно умелы для выполнения их работы.

Ответы канадцев не слишком отличаются от средних показателей опроса.

Всего опрос был проведен среди граждан 32 государств. Поряка 47% участников считают себя умнее, образованнее, способнее, чем необходимо.

“Работодатели, которые хотят удержать своих служащих на рабочем месте, должны постоянно находить для них новые цели и задачи, выполняя которые, люди чувствовали бы себя более удовлетворенными”, – говорит Ханна Вайнберг, представитель Randstad Canada.

Наибольшее число считающих себя слишком квалифицированными работниками обнаружилось в Китае – 84%. В Турции таковых оказалось 78%, а в Греции – 69%.

С другой стороны, порядка 47% итальянцев считают, что они недостаточно умелы для позиции, которую занимают. В Японии так же считают 42% всех работающих, а в Чили – 41%.

Канадцы, между тем, считают лучшими не только себя, но и “того парня”. Порядка 40% всех работников уверены – слишком квалифицированными являются также и их коллеги по работе. А вот 45% канадцев думают, что образования у их коллег как раз не достаточно для того, чтобы занимать определенную позицию.
Что касается образования, то 72% канадских работников уверены, что работают как раз по специальности.

How To Respond When They Say ‘You’re Overqualified’

I’m 56. I recently left a Director position in the company I worked for from 2001 to 2020.


A lot of recruiters contact me about job opportunities, but then they tell me «I can’t submit your resume for this job opening — you’re overqualified.»

Watch on Forbes:

It’s not so bad when recruiters tell me «You’re overqualified» before I’ve interviewed for a job, but what’s really frustrating is when I interview two or three times for a position and then they tell me «We love your experience, but you’re overqualified for this job.»

I don’t want to beg for a job by saying «That’s okay, I’ll take the job anyway!» When they say «You’re overqualified» I assume they mean «We don’t want to pay your salary.»

What should I do when I hear «you’re overqualified» and how can I avoid these situations in the future?

The first time you talk with your hiring manager — the person who will be your boss if you get the job — you have one mission. You have to find out what kind of Business Pain lurks behind the job ad.

If the pain is great, then the company has an incentive to pay an experienced person like you whatever it takes to solve their problem. If you can’t get the hiring manager to articulate his or her pain, you’ll be stuck in Pay Grade Land, where they tell you «We love you and we’d love to hire you, but this position only pays $X.»

Keep in mind that all of the stuff they tell you about pay grades and levels is both subjective and totally made up. I was an HR SVP for thousands of years. Everything that seems fixed and solid in the business world is flexible if somebody wants to change it.

If we are honest about it, most job-seekers are too afraid to ask questions about Business Pain. They don’t want to go there. They want to answer the standard, scripted interview questions. They don’t realize how terribly they diminish their own power when they show up to play the part of the Good Little Job Seeker rather than to stand in their power and consult with their prospective boss.

Even senior-level executive job seekers grovel on job interviews. They think their resume will get them the job, but it doesn’t work that way.

To get past the «overqualified» hurdle, you have to get your hiring manager into a meaty conversation about his or her most searing pain. All of a sudden during your conversation, they will see how bringing you in could fundamentally shift their situation. Their biggest problem could go away.

Suddenly the extra $25,000 or $30,000 per year you will cost them above their original (possibly delusional) salary range seems like peanuts, because it is.

Senior-level candidates like you relieve major pain points. You need to get your hiring manager talking about those pain points to overcome the «overqualified» roadblock.


If a hiring manager says «I really want to hire you, but I can’t afford you» you can say «Let’s do a four-week or six-week project, in that case.» They can hire you as a consultant for a short-term gig. They can see up close what a super hero you are.

Job hunting is scary but it becomes less and less scary as you recall and reclaim your power. Get a journal and write in it. Write about the huge problems you’ve already solved and the money you’ve saved or generated for your past employers. Of course you are overqualified for lots of jobs. Anybody who stays in a job for six months becomes overqualified. That’s not the issue.

The issue is «Do you have any problems in your company? If you don’t, then I wouldn’t want to work here anyway. If you do, let’s look at how much money those problems are costing you! Maybe it would cost a lot less to hire me than to hire someone cheaper and live with your problems for another few years.»

I’m 56. I recently left a Director position in the company I worked for from 2001 to 2020.

A lot of recruiters contact me about job opportunities, but then they tell me «I can’t submit your resume for this job opening — you’re overqualified.»

Watch on Forbes:

It’s not so bad when recruiters tell me «You’re overqualified» before I’ve interviewed for a job, but what’s really frustrating is when I interview two or three times for a position and then they tell me «We love your experience, but you’re overqualified for this job.»

I don’t want to beg for a job by saying «That’s okay, I’ll take the job anyway!» When they say «You’re overqualified» I assume they mean «We don’t want to pay your salary.»

What should I do when I hear «you’re overqualified» and how can I avoid these situations in the future?

The first time you talk with your hiring manager — the person who will be your boss if you get the job — you have one mission. You have to find out what kind of Business Pain lurks behind the job ad.

If the pain is great, then the company has an incentive to pay an experienced person like you whatever it takes to solve their problem. If you can’t get the hiring manager to articulate his or her pain, you’ll be stuck in Pay Grade Land, where they tell you «We love you and we’d love to hire you, but this position only pays $X.»

Keep in mind that all of the stuff they tell you about pay grades and levels is both subjective and totally made up. I was an HR SVP for thousands of years. Everything that seems fixed and solid in the business world is flexible if somebody wants to change it.

If we are honest about it, most job-seekers are too afraid to ask questions about Business Pain. They don’t want to go there. They want to answer the standard, scripted interview questions. They don’t realize how terribly they diminish their own power when they show up to play the part of the Good Little Job Seeker rather than to stand in their power and consult with their prospective boss.


Even senior-level executive job seekers grovel on job interviews. They think their resume will get them the job, but it doesn’t work that way.

To get past the «overqualified» hurdle, you have to get your hiring manager into a meaty conversation about his or her most searing pain. All of a sudden during your conversation, they will see how bringing you in could fundamentally shift their situation. Their biggest problem could go away.

Suddenly the extra $25,000 or $30,000 per year you will cost them above their original (possibly delusional) salary range seems like peanuts, because it is.

Senior-level candidates like you relieve major pain points. You need to get your hiring manager talking about those pain points to overcome the «overqualified» roadblock.

If a hiring manager says «I really want to hire you, but I can’t afford you» you can say «Let’s do a four-week or six-week project, in that case.» They can hire you as a consultant for a short-term gig. They can see up close what a super hero you are.

Job hunting is scary but it becomes less and less scary as you recall and reclaim your power. Get a journal and write in it. Write about the huge problems you’ve already solved and the money you’ve saved or generated for your past employers. Of course you are overqualified for lots of jobs. Anybody who stays in a job for six months becomes overqualified. That’s not the issue.

The issue is «Do you have any problems in your company? If you don’t, then I wouldn’t want to work here anyway. If you do, let’s look at how much money those problems are costing you! Maybe it would cost a lot less to hire me than to hire someone cheaper and live with your problems for another few years.»

Sorry, you are overqualified Канада

When Amanda Hiebert, a communications director based in Calgary, Canada, took a position at a vitamin supplements firm several years ago, she knew she was overqualified for the job.

The high salary and the opportunity of working for a big company attracted her.

In the US, an estimated one in four employees with a bachelor’s degree are overqualified for their current position

But once she was hired, she found the role was not demanding enough to keep her occupied. “It was boring, it wasn’t challenging, and I wasn’t doing any meaningful work,” she says. She left after just two years. And her experience is one that is all too common.

Overqualified, bored workers can develop negative attitudes that affect colleagues, says management professor Berrin Erdogan (Credit: Portland State University)


Around one in six workers in Britain are thought to be overeducated for the jobs they are doing and 58% of graduates are in roles that do not require university degrees. In the US, an estimated one in four employees with a bachelor’s degree are overqualified for their current position.

Many employers now use degrees as a standard entry requirement for roles that were traditionally done by non-graduates, leading to a kind of job inflation where workers are taking jobs that they don’t find challenging.

And while this trend may seem to be working in employers’ favour – they get to bring in a large number of smart, highly-skilled graduates – the reality is it may backfire. Research suggests companies may be harming themselves by hiring employees who are overqualified for the roles they are doing.

Resentment ripples

Having a highly-skilled overachiever on staff should, on the face of things at least, be a boon. But overqualified workers can develop negative attitudes, such as a sense of entitlement about their skills or resentment through boredom, that can ripple out to every cubicle in an office, warns Berrin Erdogan, a professor of management at Portland State University.

Many employers now use degrees as a standard entry requirement for roles that were traditionally done by non-graduates (Credit: Getty Images)

“That sense of entitlement brings everyone down, especially for those who work in teams,” she says. Her research suggests that being overly-skilled for a position can lead employees to feel different from their colleagues, which can fester leading to isolation and loneliness.

Also, if someone is overqualified they might not be fully engaged in the tasks they are given to do, which they may judge ‘beneath them’, according to Bruce Tulgan, an expert in leadership training and author of The 27 Challenges Managers Face.

“They’ll get bored as a result of low morale and they might not even do the work required in that job,” he says.

The perception of over qualification that can lead to these problems seems to be particularly prevalent among younger employees

The perception of overqualification that can lead to these problems seems to be particularly prevalent among younger employees, according to Tulgan. Millennials, Tulgan says, “have higher expectations for themselves, and their employers, compared to other generations.”

A study conducted earlier this year by researchers at the Florida Atlantic University showed that younger workers tended to be those who believe they are more talented than the position they have and often felt frustrated and disillusioned at work.

These employees are also more likely to engage in more rebellious behaviour such as coming in late, leaving early, theft or even bullying co-workers, says Michael Harari, an assistant professor at the university’s department of management programmes.


Popularity stakes

But this isn’t always the case. A recent study by Erdogan and Hong Deng, an associate professor at Durham University’s Business School, identified certain personality traits among overqualified workers that are crucial to help them fit cohesively into any workplace.

“Employees who are overqualified but equipped with good interpersonal influence skills are able to display appropriate social behaviors in interactions with co-workers and be seen as competent and likeable,” says Deng. “Those employees are popular and well accepted and therefore feel motivated to engage in positive work behaviours.”

Interpersonal influence means adapting to your surroundings, adopting a friendly attitude and refraining from disparaging your job or boss

Put simply, interpersonal influence means adapting to your surroundings, adopting a friendly attitude and refraining from disparaging your job or boss. Workers taking on that approach will be more effective performers in the office, adds Deng.

And this is the point where strong leadership can really make a difference. To keep overqualified staff engaged, leaders should give them more creative assignments, long-term projects or have them collaborate with other teams within the company, says Elisabeth Kelan, a professor of leadership at the Cranfield School of Management.

To keep overqualified staff engaged, leaders should give them more creative assignments, long-term projects or have them collaborate with other teams within the company — Elisabeth Kelan

Although if taking this route “leaders should be mindful of the fact that this might create even more resentment towards the perceived overqualified individuals,” she warns. “It is therefore important to discuss with the team why one person has been chosen for those special tasks.”

Workers who feel overqualified for their role might not be fully engaged (Credit: Getty Images)

Another way for leaders to combat negative feelings among overqualified employees is being frank about climbing the corporate ladder. Erdogan says she once spoke to a hiring manger who hired someone clearly overqualified for the position and they had an open conversation about being patient.

Don’t dumb down your CV or downplay your achievements. Be candid and authentic — Tulgan

“He said to the employee that if you stay in this position for a year, you’ll move higher up in the organisation,” she explains. “That overqualified employee responded with a sentiment of ‘That’s great! I won’t be in this role forever and I’ll get a better job down the road.’”

So what if this applies to you? The same candidness can also help people who feel they are overqualified for their role. Many job seekers will find themselves in the same situation as Hiebert, having to apply for roles that perhaps do not warrant the level of experience and expertise they have.


For those that do, Tulgan advises explaining why you want the job and emphasising how you can fit into the company.

“Don’t dumb down your CV or downplay your achievements,» he says. «Be candid and authentic.”

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Are you overqualified for this position?

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Copyright © 2008–2020, Glassdoor, Inc. «Glassdoor» and logo are proprietary trademarks of Glassdoor, Inc.

Sorry, you are overqualified Канада


overqualified — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ too highly qualified … English terms dictionary

overqualified — [ō΄vər kwôl′i fīd΄, o΄vərkwäl′i fīd΄] adj. having more knowledge, education, experience, etc. than needed to qualify for a particular job … English World dictionary

Overqualified — Being overqualified means one is skilled or educated beyond what is necessary for a job. There can often be high costs for companies associated with training employees. This could be a problem for professionals applying for a job where they… … Wikipedia

overqualified — o|ver|qual|i|fied [ˌəuvəˈkwɔlıfaıd US ˌouvərˈkwa: ] adj if you are overqualified for a particular job, you have more experience or training than is needed ≠ underqualified ▪ I m having trouble finding another job everyone says I m overqualified … Dictionary of contemporary English

overqualified — o|ver|qual|i|fied [ ,ouvər kwalə,faıd ] adjective more experienced and educated than you need to be to do a particular job: They told me I was overqualified for the job … Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

overqualified — adjective having so much experience or training that people do not want to employ you for particular jobs: The firm told me not to bother applying because I was overqualified … Longman dictionary of contemporary English

overqualified — UK [ˌəʊvə(r)ˈkwɒlɪˌfaɪd] / US [ˌoʊvərˈkwɑləˌfaɪd] adjective more experienced and educated than you need to be to do a particular job They told me I was overqualified for the job … English dictionary

overqualified — adjective Date: 1954 having more education, training, or experience than a job calls for … New Collegiate Dictionary

overqualified — /oh veuhr kwol euh fuyd /, adj. having more education, training, or experience than is required for a job or position. [1950 55; OVER + QUALIFIED] * * * … Universalium

overqualified — adjective Having too many qualifications to be deemed appropriate for a (usually unskilled) job. Ant: underqualified … Wiktionary

overqualified — adj. over certified for a position; too qualified for a position … English contemporary dictionary

Sorry, you are overqualified Канада

I started working in a private bank, but they said I was overqualified, so they would find another position for me. After a while, a lady who was not very experienced got the job I’d applied for. A second position was offered and the same thing happened. I refused to accept this shame. I spoke to my CEO and asked him if he was pleased with my work. He assured me that my work was fantastic! I increased my tithe to 20% for three months. It was very hard, but God responded to me in an amazing way! I was promoted to Associate of Compliance and Client On-boarding, which enabled me to do marketing and also travel internationally and earn the exact salary of my increased tithe!


Sorry, You’re Overqualified For The Job

The words hit me like a bag full of candy to the face — incredibly painful, but full of sweetness. Confusion follows. Deep, intense confusion.

I mean, you have to understand why I would be baffled. You said you wanted me. You said so repeatedly. I have the e-mails and the calls to prove it. I didn’t just imagine that.

So is this response an excuse? Are you just saying I’m “too right for you” just to be nice? Are you trying to let me down easy? Or are you serious? Why did you have to word it like that, then? Am I really that good? If I am, then why don’t you just take me?

You’ve put me through all these loops. I’ve aced all your tests — you’ve said so yourself, even. I’ve persevered, I’ve stuck around, I’ve put my best foot forward. I’ve dressed up for you and tackled every obstacle. And at every stage, you showed interest. But now, now that we’ve gone through all the questions and conversations and back-and-forth ridiculousness, I’ve been found wanting?

But you don’t want someone who is perfect for you, do you? Who dots every “i” and crosses every “t.” You want someone less experienced, someone you can mold, someone who will depend on you for every move. Someone who will be so eternally grateful to you that they will dare not question you for fear of losing you. Someone who you think won’t jump ship at the first chance they have.

As if I were ever to do that to you.

I mean, I had other opportunities, other chances to be happy. If you knew I wasn’t what you wanted, why did you string me along? Why did you tease me with the prospect of more? Of something better?

Whatever. It’s your loss. You could have had someone who gave 110% of himself all the time, every time. Someone with a mind of his own. Someone with innovative ideas, who loves being part of a team. Someone who didn’t just automatically think about pleasing you, but also thought of moving us forward, together, as a unit. But you chose the lesser, cheaper, easier alternative.

And when did that ever become a thing? I grew up my entire life to be the best I can be. Now it’s a liability. Should I have been less perfect for you? Should I have smiled less? Maybe not worn my nice shoes? Should I have been less perfect? Less me?

It would have been great with you. We were not just good “on paper.” You know it, and I know it, and had you given me an honest-to-God chance, we could have made magic together.

“We regret to inform you that we believe your qualifications are too high for the job offered,” you say.

“I’m sorry, I just think you’re too perfect for me right now,” I hear.

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