Sublet Канада


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Renting your first apartment

Costs of living on your own

Before you move out of your parents� home, consider all the costs of living on your own. Wherever you live, your basic expenses will be more than just the cost of campus housing or rent. Knowing the costs of living on your own ahead of time will help you prepare a realistic budget that you can live with.

Upfront costs of moving

Before you move, you may have to pay for some things upfront, including first and last month�s rent and utilities.

Security deposits, first and last month�s rent

Your landlord may ask you to pay a security deposit before you rent an apartment. These deposits are typically used to cover potential damage to the rental unit. You’ll usually get your deposit back if you leave the rental unit in the same condition as when you moved in.

Generally, the security deposit can�t be higher than the cost of one month�s rent. In Quebec, landlords must not ask for last month�s rent or any other money aside from the first month�s rent.

Your landlord may ask you to pay the first and last month�s rent at the same time. Some landlords may let you pay the last month�s rent when you complete the rental application and then pay the first month�s rent when you�re ready to move in.

Generally, landlords use last month�s rent to pay for the last month you live in your apartment. For example, in Ontario, landlords must not use last month�s rent to repair damages to the rental property.

Utilities and telecommunications

You may need to pay a fee to set up a new account with a utility, cable, Internet or telephone company. You may also need to pay security deposits on these accounts.

Security deposits vary depending on the company you�re dealing with.

The amount you pay for a security deposit may be based on:

  • estimated usage
  • your credit history
  • a flat rate determined by the utility company

You can ask the company to waive the security deposit if you have a good credit history.

You can usually get your deposits back if you pay your bills on time and don’t owe the company any money. The refund will usually appear as a credit on your bill when you close your account or when you show a good payment history. The company may have to to pay you interest on your security deposit. Check with your utility company.

Moving expenses

You may need to add these upfront moving costs to your budget:

  • truck rental
  • movers
  • moving boxes and other supplies
  • time off work

Renter�s insurance

If you live in an apartment or rent a home, it�s a good idea to get tenant�s, or renter�s, insurance.

Consider getting enough insurance to cover the value of:

  • damage to, or loss of, your possessions
  • personal property stolen from your car
  • accidental damage you cause to any part of the rental property
  • injury caused to visitors

Outfitting your place

If you’re moving out for the first time, you may need to buy:

  • furniture
  • dishes
  • kitchen utensils
  • small appliances
  • bedding
  • towels
  • cleaning supplies

Ongoing costs of living on your own

Depending on what your rental agreement or lease covers, you may also need to pay for:

  • parking
  • utilities such as hydro and heat
  • telecommunications including cellphone, Internet, cable, telephone
  • laundry
  • snow removal
  • lawn maintenance

Living with a roommate

To reduce your overall living expenses, you may want to consider sharing the cost of rent, utilities and other household expenses with one or more roommates.

If you decide to live with someone else, discuss your living arrangements and shared financial responsibilities.

For example, figure out the following:

  • How you’ll divide rent
  • How you’ll divide the security deposits
  • Will you share bills and expenses or pay for them separately
  • What each of you’ll buy for the apartment

Make sure you understand what you’re responsible for.

Usually, when you sign a rental agreement or lease with a landlord, you�re legally responsible for:

  • any damages to the property
  • paying the rent on time

If two or more tenants sign the same rental agreement, each is equally responsible for payments and damages. If each of you sign separate rental agreements, you’re only responsible for what is in your own written agreement.

If your name alone is on the utility bills, you must pay them on time. Missing a payment for your rent or utilities could hurt your credit score.

Tenant and landlord rights and responsibilities vary across the country.

Check your credit report before you consider moving

Your credit report and credit score may affect your options when you decide to move out on your own. Some landlords may run a credit check on you to be sure you’ll pay the rent on time.

If you don�t have a credit history yet, or have had credit trouble in the past, a landlord may ask you for a guarantor. A guarantor is usually a parent or guardian with a good credit history. The guarantor agrees to pay for you if you’re unable to pay your rent.

Some landlords will ask you for your social insurance number to run a credit check. If you don�t feel comfortable sharing this, you don�t have to provide it. The landlord can still get your credit history using other forms of identification.

Take the time to understand your credit report and credit score, including how your credit report works and why your credit history matters.

Move out within your budget

Spending too much on rent may make it difficult to cover your other expenses or save for future plans.

In general, your rent payment and household-related expenses should not be higher than 30% of your gross household income. Your gross household income is all income you receive before taxes and deductions. For example, if your gross pay is $4,000 a month, try to limit your housing costs to $1,200 a month or less.

Review your budget

Before you move, prepare a realistic budget that reflects your needs and wants.

Need: something essential that you must have, such as shelter, basic clothing, food or renter�s insurance.

Want: something non-essential that you want but don’t need, such as cable TV, designer clothing or eating out every week.

It�s also important to think about things like housing location and access to public transportation.

To help you prioritize and decide what to include in your monthly budget, list non-essential features in order of their importance to you.

For example, figure out what it would cost for a place that offers you:

  • walking distance to school or work
  • public transportation close by
  • businesses and conveniences close by
  • 24-hour security
  • laundry facilities
  • air conditioning
  • family or friends close by
  • gym or exercise room
  • hardwood floors
  • on-site storage

Set financial goals before you move

Whether you�re planning to move out next month or next year, think about your financial goals. Then make a plan to be sure you have enough money to meet them. Make room in your monthly budget to begin saving for these goals.

For example, think about:

  • How much you need to save for first and last month’s rent
  • How much you need to save for deposits
  • What furniture you may need to buy
  • What other items you may need to buy

Make room in your monthly budget to begin saving for these goals.

Budget for your move

While you get ready to move, stay organized, stay on track and stay on budget.

Build an emergency fund

Make saving part of your monthly budget.

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You’ll have unplanned expenses. For example, your car breaks down or you lose your cell phone.

Start saving so that you don�t have to use a credit card or line of credit to pay for unplanned expenses. Begin by transferring 5% to 10% from each paycheque into a high-interest savings account, a TFSA or investment account. You should be able to access your money quickly, and at low cost, in case of an emergency.


Most employers will deposit your pay directly into your chequing or savings account. You may find it easier to reach your saving goals if you set up automatic transfers to a savings or investment account each pay cheque.

Plan for debt repayment

As part of your overall budget, you need to plan for debt repayment. This is especially important when you’re considering your monthly housing costs. If you have debts to repay, some properties may be unaffordable. Or you might need to consider getting a roommate to share expenses.

Try out your monthly budget

Before you move, make sure that you have enough money to cover your monthly living expenses and the costs of moving.

If you don�t have enough money to cover your expenses, review your budget to see where you can cut back. Focus on reducing non-essential expenses such as spending on entertainment or eating out. Avoid cutting essentials such as rent or food. You may also want to consider delaying your move until you can save enough money to cover the upfront costs.

Once you have the right balance of income and expenses, try following this new budget for a few months. Make sure you can live the way you want to within the spending limits you’ve set for yourself. If you’re struggling, go back to your budget and rework the numbers. Or find more money to cover the shortfall.

What to consider before you rent

Instead of renting, you may be considering buying a home. Deciding whether to rent or buy a home depends on your needs and financial circumstances.

If you choose to rent, you may not have to pay for:

  • real estate agent fees
  • property taxes
  • home maintenance costs
  • utilities such as water if they�re included in the rent

Some other advantages to renting are that:

  • there is no long-term commitment
  • if something breaks, a superintendent or landlord will usually arrange to have it repaired or replaced, unless you were responsible for the problem
  • renting may be cheaper than buying a house

If you’re thinking that owning a home is for you, consider the costs of buying a home and maintaining a home.

What you should know about rental agreements

A rental agreement, or lease, is a contract between a landlord and a tenant. The landlord grants the tenant the right to occupy a rental unit. In return the tenant commits to paying rent. The contract may also include other terms or rules. When you sign a rental agreement, you’re agreeing to respect those terms or rules.

A written rental agreement is an official record of what you and the landlord have agreed to. If there’s a dispute later, the rental agreement may help to settle it.

If this is your first time renting, your landlord may ask for a guarantor. This is someone who agrees to pay the rent if you can�t. If you need a guarantor, the landlord will have them sign an agreement that describes their responsibilities.

What your rental agreement includes

  • The landlord�s and tenant�s names, addresses and contact information
  • The rental term, the length of time you agree to stay in the apartment before ending your rental agreement
  • The monthly rent amount
  • The date you must pay rent
  • Services, such as electricity or parking
  • Any separate charges
  • The conditions for the termination of a rental agreement
  • When the landlord can increase the rent and by how much
  • The deposit amount and any conditions
  • The rules that the landlord requires all tenants to follow

Inspect your apartment first

Before you move in, inspect the apartment. In some provinces, you’re required to do an inspection. This will ensure you’re not held responsible for damage that may already exist.

The inspection should be done with your landlord. Document and photograph any visible property damage.

Subletting your apartment

If you need to move before your rental agreement expires, you may choose to sublet your apartment. To sublet your apartment, you’ll need to find someone who will live in your place, pay rent and follow the requirements set out in your rental agreement.

If the person you’re subletting to does not pay the rent or causes damage to your apartment, you’re responsible.

Before you sublet, you need permission from your landlord.

Learn more about common rental requirements in the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation�s guides I want to Rent and I am Renting.

Questions to ask before you sign the rental agreement

  • Which repairs are your responsibility
  • How much notice you must give if you want to end your rental agreement�usually 60 days
  • Subletting rules
  • When and why your landlord can enter the rental unit
  • How to resolve disputes in case of late payments, damages or eviction notices

Protect yourself from rental frauds and scams

Watch out for rental scams. In general, if a deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Warning signs of rental scams include:

  • the monthly rent is much less than the current market rate
  • you’re asked to leave a deposit without any formal rental agreement or lease in place
  • you’re asked to send a security deposit to a landlord outside the country
  • you’re offered a unit but no one does a background check on you
  • when you ask about the apartment, you get an email that sends you to a website asking for personal or financial information
  • ads that show pictures of the outside of the property only, or pictures that don’t match the actual property

Queen’s University Sublet Housing

Kingston (ON), Canada

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Muslim Societies, Global Perspectives (Queen’s University)

212 Watson Hall, Queen’s University,, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s Students for Literacy

Queen’s Center Room 615A, Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Conservative Association

Kingston (ON), Canada

QPID (Queen’s Project on International Development)

3rd Floor, Queen’s Centre, Kingston (ON), Canada

International Development Week

284 Earl St., Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Rugby Alumni

284 Earl Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s ARC

284 Earl Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s International Affairs Association (QIAA)

284 Earl Street � Queen’s Centre Room A-602, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada


Queen’s Football

284 Earl St., Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Student Life Centre

87 Union St, Room 144 (JDUC), Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s University Office of Faith and Spiritual Life

Room 142B, 87 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 2N9, Canada

Queen’s University Student Academic Success Services

Stauffer Library 101 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L3N6, Canada

The Queen’s Pub

John Deutsch University Centre, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

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JDUC, 87 Union St W, Queen’s University, Kingston (ON), Canada

QMUNi: Queen’s Model United Nations Invitational

87 Union Street West, Kingston (ON), K7L3N6, Canada

QPS: Queen’s Premedical Society

Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Writing Centre — Student Academic Success Services

Stauffer Library, 101 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 5C4, Canada

Lease Renewal, Termination and Subletting

Find out how to renew a rental contract, how to terminate one, and whether you may sublet in Canada.

At the end of the lease agreement — generally a year — the lease can be renewed on a monthly basis. However, this will depend on the province or territory. If the lease is renewed on a monthly basis, the lease termination notice is one month.

  • To check lease statutory renewal terms, see the Canada Mortgage & Housing Corporation factsheets for the individual province or territory: Click here

Terminating a Lease

Generally, rental agreements can be terminated by the tenant with no penalties, provided that a minimum of 60 days notice is given to the landlord. Specific notice periods can be found in the province or territory’s Residential Tenancies Act or with local Rental Authorities.

  • The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation has renting fact sheets for each province or territory detailing these notice periods: Click here

It is generally very difficult for landlords to evict tenants before the end of the lease agreement. The landlord must have solid reasons to terminate the agreement, for example non-payment of rent or damage to the property. In order for eviction to occur, they need to obtain a court order, as well as a notice of termination.

Subletting

Subletting is permitted and legal, but the landlord’s permission should be sought in advance. If the tenant chooses to sublet, the original tenant still holds responsibility for the property, including any damage and ensuring the rent is paid on time.

Gathering local knowledge on arrival in Canada

A comprehensive guide to finding your feet, sampling different options, and making good decisions.

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Many newcomers feel compelled to make long-term arrangements immediately upon arrival in Canada, or even before departure. This may include signing a lease on an apartment or a contract with an employer, or purchasing a car.

There is nothing wrong with making long-term arrangements to make your life simpler or more affordable, or both. In many cases, doing so is the right thing to do for your particular situation. However, this is the key:

  • You don�t have to commit early if you don�t want to.
  • There may be a better option.
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This article will explore a key concept to help you settle into your new surroundings on arrival in Canada: gathering local knowledge.

Accommodation
Transport
Employment
Services

Accommodation on arrival in Canada

Most leases in Canada run for 12 months or longer, and most entail a deposit. A lease is a contract, after all, and signing a lease places certain obligations on both the landlord (the lessor) and the tenant (the lessee), as well as certain rights.

Oftentimes, newcomers to Canada who rush into signing a lease come to regret their choice. Maybe the chosen neighbourhood is too far from the workplace or transport links aren�t close to hand. Or maybe there is a dearth of good local restaurants or cafes, or the kids aren�t enjoying attending the local school, or the apartment itself has defects or noisy neighbours. Whatever the situation, there are options for testing a neighbourhood before committing to it.

Airbnb

Since launching in 2009, Airbnb has become the go-to online space for renters and lodgers to rent short-term accommodation, and the service has deep roots across Canada.

One distinct advantage of Airbnb is that many hosts take it upon themselves to act as a local tour guide for their guests. When deciding which host to stay with, read the reviews to see if this informal service is typical of the host � it may help you become acquainted with a neighbourhood, including local knowledge of hidden gems.

Thinking of trying Airbnb? This link allows Moving2Canada readers to get a $45 discount on their first Airbnb booking in Canada!

Subletting

Subletting is a temporary arrangement whereby a leaseholder physically leaves an apartment or house for an agreed period and has the right to return when the sub-lease comes to an end. The subletter (i.e. the leaseholder) is neither the owner nor physical occupant of the apartment or house for this temporary period, but he or she is still responsible for the lease and has other responsibilities toward the sub-tenant (i.e. you).

Subletting accommodation may be perfect for you and your family, if applicable, because not only do you get to try out a particular neighbourhood, but the accommodation will likely be fully furnished because the subletter has been living in the apartment or house and expects to return.

Sharing

This may be an option for newcomers arriving without dependents. By sharing accommodation, typically you would have a private room in a shared apartment or house, with common use of living areas, the kitchen, and bathroom. It is quite normal for people in Canada to share an address, even if they did not know each other well � or at all � beforehand. This is especially true closer to downtown city cores, where property values and rent is more expensive.

In addition to saving a significant chunk on your monthly expenditure, there may be a range of other advantages to sharing accommodation on arrival in Canada. For starters, it may help you to create a new social circle, either with the people you share a home or through their friends and contacts, or both. If your roommates are local or speak English perfectly, this may also help as you settle into your new surroundings.

Still not sure? Visit our neighbourhood guides

We offer up-to-date guides on neighbourhoods in Canada�s largest cities to suit every interest, budget, and family size:

Learn more about finding accommodation in Canada

Make the most of your Canadian adventure

Create a Moving2Canada account for the latest updates and special offers, and get a FREE copy of our Getting Started Guide!

Create your account

Transport options on arrival in Canada

Carsharing

Newcomers to Canada�s major cities have plenty of options for getting from A to B, including public transit systems, dedicated bike paths, or owning a car. Over recent years, however, carsharing has been added to the mix. Different cities and carsharing providers offer a range of subscription models, allowing newcomers to make short-term use of a vehicle (having the right to do so is a prerequisite, of course, and you can learn more about that here).

Learn more:

Bikesharing

Canadian cities and neighbourhoods are generally bike-friendly, but certain factors may make you reluctant to become the owner of a bicycle soon after arrival. For example, you may not have the space to store a bike, or you�re saving for a particular model, or perhaps the weather is a factor and you only plan to bike for a few months of the year.

If any of these reasons apply, bikesharing may be the right option for you. Learn more about bikesharing in the following cities:

Employment on arrival in Canada

Temp agencies


Temporary work agencies link employers with workers. Agencies are private companies that make revenue by charging the company for whom it has found appropriate workers, or by taking a percentage of workers� pay. Some agencies focus on specific industries, while other agencies are more general.

Far from being the refuge of artists and the self-employed, temp agencies have become more ubiquitous as an increasing number of workers balance the realities of an economy that may be growing, but which also provides less long-term security for a growing share of the workforce. For newcomers to Canada, short-term contract work may allow you to try out new jobs while you build new skills, gain experience, and create new professional connections on arrival in Canada. Having an employment agency � or better still, a range of agencies � looking for your next contract can also save you valuable time in between jobs.

Recruitment agencies

Job seekers in Canada do not pay to find jobs, as recruiters do not (and cannot) take any part of your salary. This is just one of the ways they are different to the temp agencies described above. Recruiters make their income from their clients (companies) when a candidate they recommend for a position becomes employed. Working with a recruiter essentially turbocharges your job search for free.

While some larger recruitment agencies work broadly across the job market, forwarding and placing candidates across a range of industries, other recruiters focus on specific areas of the job market.

Since registering in 2012, Moving2Canada�s recruitment arm, Outpost Recruitment, has quickly established itself as a boutique recruitment agency that can bring value to job seekers and Canadian employers in the construction and engineering industries. For construction and engineering jobs, visit our Outpost Recruitment agency and view the latest open positions.

Interpretation of job titles

Building your career in Canada may take longer than expected. Depending on your chosen path, there may be hurdles in getting your non-Canadian accreditation recognized, or you may just need time to network, build contacts, win interviews, and generally improve your job hunting skills. Throughout this time, it is important not to lose heart. It is also important to have an income, especially if you have extra mouths to feed.

Two of the most important things to remember are:

  • A different job title does not mean you have suddenly become inferior or lower-ranked. And even if you are suddenly a junior again, so what? You worked yourself up before, so why not again?
  • Some job titles have a different interpretation and outcome in Canada compared to locations abroad. Take, for example, client-facing roles in the food and beverage industry such as bartending and serving. Throughout much of Europe, hourly wages for these positions are decent, but extra income from tips typically only adds a little extra, or nothing. In Canada, bartenders and servers who approach their job diligently and know their products well can expect to receive generous tips from satisfied customers. It�s simply a cultural difference. Many �white collar� workers have come to Canada with resumes full of skilled employment before working in a transitional non-career-related role for up to a couple of years (though often less), and ultimately made their move to Canada a success. You can do this too. The important thing is to use your spare time wisely by improving your skills and networking so that you can take full advantage of career opportunities when they arise.

B.C. tenancy rules allow tenants to sublet for a profit

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Property manager has no say over tenant re-renting apartment at a profit

A Vancouver property manager is frustrated that one of his tenants is trying to sublet a high-end condo at a profit, and that there’s nothing he can do about it.

David Wong says the condo, which is in the Fairmont Pacific Rim hotel in Coal Harbour, rents for $4,500 a month.

Wong met with the prospective tenant and checked his credit and references before signing the lease, which was set to begin in August.

«It was basically a very simple transaction,» says Wong.

Tenant turning a profit

Before the tenant moved in, he asked to take some measurements of the suite, and Wong told him there was a key held by the building’s concierge.

«I got alerted from the concierge that he was actually trying to re-rent this unit before moving in,» Wong says.

Wong says he asked the tenant why he wasn’t upfront about his plans to rent the unit to someone else.

«He basically said, ‘Well, I’m telling you now,'» says Wong, who says he then refused to give the tenant keys to the condo.

But the tenant took Wong to arbitration�and won.

«What he’s telling the residential tenancy office is that he will eventually move in,» Wong says of the tenant. «But in the meantime he’s never moved in and he still has the right to sublet.»

Wong asked to see the sublet agreement his tenant had set up, but the copy he was shown had the rental amount blacked out. In arbitration, the tenant said he was charging $500 a month more than he was paying Wong.

Landlord ‘losing control’

Wong says he is the one who is ultimately responsible for the unit, and he takes screening his tenants seriously.

«When things fall apart, the main tenant can easily just bail, and then the landlord is left dealing with the mess the subtenant has left behind. That could be damages, or fines, anything that is of a negative nature,» says Wong.

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Wong would like to see provisions in the Residential Tenancy Act to prevent tenants from making a profit from a sublet. He is also looking for a change in the act that would remove a tenant’s right to assign a sublet.

«I’ve lost a lot of sleep over this, and this is going to happen again,» he says.

Under B.C.’s tenancy laws, a tenant does have to get written approval from the landlord before assigning a sublet, but it’s very difficult for the landlord to withhold that permission. The law states «a landlord can’t unreasonably refuse a sublet or assignment of a fixed-term tenancy for a period of six months or more,» and Wong says the word «unreasonable» is left too open to interpretation.

Wong does have the right to run a credit check on the person subletting the condo and a statement from B.C.’s housing ministry confirmed that should he have reason to believe that person could not meet the rent, he could at that point refuse the sublet.

The statement from the ministry also said that currently there are no plans to amend this section of the Residential Tenancy Act.

  • Read the Residential Tenancy Branch decision on the condo sublet below. On mobile? Read it here.

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5. �������� � ������������ ���� (�����). ����� ����������� ����� ����� ������� condo fee. Condo fee � ����������� ������, ������� ���� �� �������

Queen’s University Sublet Housing

Kingston (ON), Canada

����� ������ �������� ���������� � ��� Use this page as a place to either advertise a sublet or request sublet for housing near Queen’s University ������ Make subletting at Queen’s University easy �������� Use this page as a place to either advertise a summer sublet or request sublet at Queen’s University

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��� ������ �� �������, ��� ��������� ������ ���������� �� Facebook, �� ���� �������� ������� ���������� ����������� �� 3 ������!

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Muslim Societies, Global Perspectives (Queen’s University)

212 Watson Hall, Queen’s University,, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s Students for Literacy

Queen’s Center Room 615A, Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Conservative Association

Kingston (ON), Canada

QPID (Queen’s Project on International Development)

3rd Floor, Queen’s Centre, Kingston (ON), Canada

International Development Week

284 Earl St., Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Rugby Alumni

284 Earl Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s ARC

284 Earl Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s International Affairs Association (QIAA)

284 Earl Street � Queen’s Centre Room A-602, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s Football

284 Earl St., Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Student Life Centre

87 Union St, Room 144 (JDUC), Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

Queen’s University Office of Faith and Spiritual Life

Room 142B, 87 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 2N9, Canada

Queen’s University Student Academic Success Services

Stauffer Library 101 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L3N6, Canada

The Queen’s Pub

John Deutsch University Centre, Kingston (ON), K7L 3N6, Canada

QCSSA?????????????

JDUC, 87 Union St W, Queen’s University, Kingston (ON), Canada

QMUNi: Queen’s Model United Nations Invitational

87 Union Street West, Kingston (ON), K7L3N6, Canada

QPS: Queen’s Premedical Society

Kingston (ON), Canada

Queen’s University Writing Centre — Student Academic Success Services

Stauffer Library, 101 Union Street, Kingston (ON), K7L 5C4, Canada

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Aviasales.ru ���������� ���� �� ���������� � ������ �� 728 ������������� ����. �� �� ������� ���������� ����, �� ������ � ��� �� ������� ����������� ������ ������ � ���������������. ������� ������ � ������� � �� Aviasales.ru ����� ������� ������ �� ������ � ������. ��������� ������ ���������� 33,679,000 �������. ����������� ������ ��������� ������ (CAD).

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  • �����-��������� � ������ �� 22 641 ?

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���������� � ������ ���������� ��������, � ����� ��������� ����������� ������������ � KLM, British Airways, Finnair, LOT, Air France. ���������� ������� ���������� � ������ ����� ������ � Lufthansa, ������� ������ ���������� ������ ����� ���������.

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Sublet ������

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Hindi namin makita ang page na hinahanap mo. Hayaan mong ibalik kita sa home page.

有些內容不見了。很抱歉。

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