to move or not to move Канада


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I’m an American who moved to Canada —here’s why I’ll never move back

We all have that person in our family: the gregarious relative who slaps you on the back, laughs too loudly, and somehow takes up all the space in whatever room they happen to inhabit. In the world order, that relation is the United States. I live in Canada, the soft-spoken, more respectful, more tactful cousin, with whom you have a surprisingly great conversation and can’t wait to see again.

Before anyone assumes that I fled the United States due to the recent political strife, I’ve been gone for a decade. I left for love in 2008, right as the world was falling off a precipice due to the financial crisis. Initially, the plan was to stay for a year or two, but the longer I stayed, the deeper my roots here grew, and the more the US feels like a place to which I can never return.

Here are some of the things that keep me tied to the Great White North.

The politics are quieter

I can engage in political discussion with people holding opposing viewpoints without it turning into a character assassination of ourselves or politicians (for the most part). The pre-election campaign cycles are much shorter, and there are five active political parties. Politics are still politics, but most of the time, it’s not incredibly sensational.

Their borders seem more open to me

The world is faced with a migrant crisis, and Canada is committed to opening that golden door so the huddled masses can come to breathe free. Rather than just providing charity for refugees and immigrants, Canada’s goal is to solve labor shortages and bolster the population to power the economy for years to come. As an immigrant, being given the chance to have a positive economic impact and contribute to a thriving society is much appreciated.

They have a cross-country train

Like in the States, train travel is expensive. But both the Trans Canada Railway and VIA Rail offer options to take you from coast to coast, giving people a way to see a large swath of the country. This one’s on my bucket list.

They have pseudo-socialized healthcare

Contrary to popular rhetoric, healthcare in Canada is not free; it’s funded through a combination of personal and corporate taxation. But as long as you have your health card, you don’t have to pay for the most basic services, including doctor visits, ultrasounds, and hospital stays. (Well, unless you want a private room. That will cost extra.)

For the most part, guns are for hunting

There are plenty of guns in Canada. Yes, some of them are used for violent crime, and there aren’t strict gun regulations in place, but the culture around guns doesn’t seem as fanatic (yet). For reference, according to Vox, Canada has 5.1 gun-related homicides per million people; America has 29.7.

I like their money

No more worrying about taping that bill back together — the bills are made of polymer. The newest design also features a person of color, civil rights activist Viola Desmond.

The currency has fun nicknames

The dollar bill and two-dollar bill are coins, nicknamed the loonie and the toonie.

Poutine is seriously amazing

It’s not just cheese and gravy on French fries. The secret lies in the cheese curds — the fresh, squeaky bits of curdled milk. While some Canadians think any variation is sacrilege, lobster poutine is pretty divine.

To move or not to move Канада

We are facing an agonizing choice about whether to move to Switzerland indefinitely, and wanted to hear your collective opinions. We are a family of 4, with kids aged 4 and 0.5, and my wife and I have great career opportunities in French Switzerland. However, we also have an equally good opportunity at home in the US (yes, it’s very much a first-world problem), hence the difficulty of making a decision.

We previously lived in Switzerland for 6 months and loved it. But might it be that we were just in a honeymoon period? It seems possible that if we were to live in Switzerland for longer, it will turn into just another country and we will start having regrets for moving so far away from our friends and extended family.

Also, during our previous stay, we only socialized with a few other expat families. I worry that life within the expat bubble would feel rather hollow in the longer run, but integration feels daunting given that I don’t speak a word of French as of now, and also because of the supposedly more reserved nature of Swiss society.

And then there is the issue of the kids. My 4-year old is an extremely happy kid: he loves his school and his home life and is verbally precocious (of course, like most American kids, he only speaks English). I wonder if an international move might destabilize his life. And I worry that if we «failed» in Switzerland and had to move back to the US in 5 years, that move would be tough on him and his brother.

All in all, I am very acutely aware of my privileges, but that doesn’t make the choice easy.

To Move Or Not To Move? That Is The Question

Post written by

Jarred Kessler is the CEO of EasyKnock.

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Moving costs are prohibitive.

It can cost a hefty sum to move. Packing supplies, moving trucks or professional movers, driving costs like fuel and tolls all add up. This doesn’t even take into account all the incidental costs that tend to crop up from moving, like that new trash can you’ll need to buy, or replacing all the spices you tossed. There are, of course, ways to cut moving costs, like recruiting friends with trucks and foregoing a moving service altogether.

However, if your home just happens to be located in a currently trendy neighborhood and your equity has as a result soared, moving just might be the way to go.

Rentals are hard to find.

We’re seeing something of a shift in what makes up the American Dream for a lot of people. It used to be that buying a home was a given, a logical part of growing up and was something nearly everyone aspired to do. It’s not so much a given anymore, though.

More and more people are opting to rent instead of buying homes, and it’s happening across the map. From the biggest cities on out to the ‘burbs, renting makes more sense for a lot of people than it did 20 years ago. I believe this is due to so many people living through the 2008 housing and economic crisis, combined with the fact that so many people can’t make ends meet as the middle class shrinks.

With more people looking to rent single-family dwellings, it only makes sense that these rentals don’t stay for rent long and that nice family homes are harder to get into. If you are looking to sell your home but not buy a new one, the scarcity of single-family rentals is definitely something you’ll want to consider. Will you be able to find a rental if you decide to sell and not buy a new home?

Alternatively, let’s say you do decide to buy a new home. You may have an easier time finding a suitable place to put down roots if you’re planning on buying another home. The market is moving fast, but because of the success in the housing market over the past couple years, more people are selling so that they can reap the benefits. However, you will want to carefully consider your intent to buy, considering the next point.

Buying isn’t the quite the investment it once was.

We’ve all been told that we ought to quit throwing our money away on rent and buy a house instead. «It’s a great investment,» according to popular wisdom.

That may not be such a sure bet these days, though. When you take into account that, in most circumstances, it’s cheaper to rent than it is to own a home, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s reported numbers on average rent and average owner costs with a mortgage. It’s also cheaper to rent because many people will see greater returns from a 401(k) than a mortgage, and there are other options available in the investment arena.

Essentially, renting could save you money each month, so selling your home and renting instead might be a sound financial decision. You should invest the money saved by renting into an investment option with a higher return than you were getting on your mortgage and build more wealth than purchasing your home ever would have allowed.

Is your current home working for you?

Does the house you’re in now suit your needs, both intrinsic and financial? Does the location itself work for you? Does it suit your family? Can you afford your mortgage payments without much difficulty? If so, you probably don’t want to move. There’s no sense in taking on all the extra stress that can come with a large financial transaction (buying and/or selling a home) and moving.

If your home isn’t working for you, whether it’s too big or too small or too expensive or in the wrong place, you’re probably going to want to consider moving.

How To Decide To Stay Or Go

The above factors are a great jumping-off point to help you work out whether you should move or not. Act on these considerations and find your own answers by getting moving quotes, checking out rentals or properties for sale in your desired area and looking into the cost of rental and owned housing in your desired area to see if you could save some money. Get introspective about your current housing situation and contemplate how it’s working for you. Make a pros and cons list, if you must, and be sure you take into account all of your options.

Are you thinking about selling your home and moving to a new one? As the creator of a platform that made buying and selling homes online easier, I’ve heard all the reasons — good and bad — people have for choosing to sell or buy a home or not. I recommend that you think through this decision thoroughly and consider the following factors if you’re trying to sort out the answer to this question for yourself.

Moving costs are prohibitive.

It can cost a hefty sum to move. Packing supplies, moving trucks or professional movers, driving costs like fuel and tolls all add up. This doesn’t even take into account all the incidental costs that tend to crop up from moving, like that new trash can you’ll need to buy, or replacing all the spices you tossed. There are, of course, ways to cut moving costs, like recruiting friends with trucks and foregoing a moving service altogether.

However, if your home just happens to be located in a currently trendy neighborhood and your equity has as a result soared, moving just might be the way to go.

Rentals are hard to find.

We’re seeing something of a shift in what makes up the American Dream for a lot of people. It used to be that buying a home was a given, a logical part of growing up and was something nearly everyone aspired to do. It’s not so much a given anymore, though.

More and more people are opting to rent instead of buying homes, and it’s happening across the map. From the biggest cities on out to the ‘burbs, renting makes more sense for a lot of people than it did 20 years ago. I believe this is due to so many people living through the 2008 housing and economic crisis, combined with the fact that so many people can’t make ends meet as the middle class shrinks.

With more people looking to rent single-family dwellings, it only makes sense that these rentals don’t stay for rent long and that nice family homes are harder to get into. If you are looking to sell your home but not buy a new one, the scarcity of single-family rentals is definitely something you’ll want to consider. Will you be able to find a rental if you decide to sell and not buy a new home?

Alternatively, let’s say you do decide to buy a new home. You may have an easier time finding a suitable place to put down roots if you’re planning on buying another home. The market is moving fast, but because of the success in the housing market over the past couple years, more people are selling so that they can reap the benefits. However, you will want to carefully consider your intent to buy, considering the next point.

Buying isn’t the quite the investment it once was.

We’ve all been told that we ought to quit throwing our money away on rent and buy a house instead. «It’s a great investment,» according to popular wisdom.

That may not be such a sure bet these days, though. When you take into account that, in most circumstances, it’s cheaper to rent than it is to own a home, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s reported numbers on average rent and average owner costs with a mortgage. It’s also cheaper to rent because many people will see greater returns from a 401(k) than a mortgage, and there are other options available in the investment arena.

Essentially, renting could save you money each month, so selling your home and renting instead might be a sound financial decision. You should invest the money saved by renting into an investment option with a higher return than you were getting on your mortgage and build more wealth than purchasing your home ever would have allowed.

Is your current home working for you?

Does the house you’re in now suit your needs, both intrinsic and financial? Does the location itself work for you? Does it suit your family? Can you afford your mortgage payments without much difficulty? If so, you probably don’t want to move. There’s no sense in taking on all the extra stress that can come with a large financial transaction (buying and/or selling a home) and moving.

If your home isn’t working for you, whether it’s too big or too small or too expensive or in the wrong place, you’re probably going to want to consider moving.

How To Decide To Stay Or Go

The above factors are a great jumping-off point to help you work out whether you should move or not. Act on these considerations and find your own answers by getting moving quotes, checking out rentals or properties for sale in your desired area and looking into the cost of rental and owned housing in your desired area to see if you could save some money. Get introspective about your current housing situation and contemplate how it’s working for you. Make a pros and cons list, if you must, and be sure you take into account all of your options.

To Move or Not to Move

Almost all elite cricketers have a pre-delivery movement or a ‘trigger’ movement but why do so many feel it’s the correct thing to do rather than simply standing still?

If we look at the benefit of having that movement it may answer that question. Many players believe that by having the trigger it gives them some momentum into their secondary movement and to be balanced at the point of release. I believe that the fundamental reason is to buy the batter more time or at least give the illusion of that. This is fine providing the player can regularly practice the trigger, because the timing of this is vital. Imagine doing something for half an hour in training and expect it to become second nature immediately.

If the trigger is performed early the batter may feel they are too stationary and if they perform it late, they reduce the time available to move again. Inconsistencies of movement size can put the players feet in the wrong position which can bring problems with balance. This could lead to the head falling to the off-side blocking off the leg side or restricting the batter’s movement toward the ball. If you as a player find yourself ‘short’ of the ball regularly this could be the reason. Try then to make your movement sooner.

Another major factor to consider is the type of bowler that you are facing. Generally, the rule of thumb is back and across with the trigger vs seam and forward pressing against spin. The main reasons for this are the illusion of time that you create. By moving backwards slightly and into a consistent position the player will have created an extra split second of time that the ball must travel, this in turn can bring confidence to the player.

Against spin the batter generally will be moving forward onto the front foot or even advancing down the track, so the initial forward movement creates momentum into the primary step. Other forms of trigger movement are to widen the stance by moving your back foot back and your front foot forward slightly to increase the size of your base, this can however lead to feeling stuck at the point of delivery. If you’re not looking to move but to feel some momentum some players will chose to tap both feet on the spot in order to ready yourself for clear footwork.

Whatever you decide to do it needs to be consistent. Consistent timing, size and direction of movement to reduce the variation in head position. After all the head needs to be still at the point of delivery with your eyes level. If you can’t perform this movement the same every time in a way that benefits you and you are still struggling, then go back to basics and try standing still.

WD & PL

A Leading Edge is a series of educational cricket books written and illustrated by Patrick Latham and Wesley Durston. Their first book, ‘A Leading Edge for Captains’ is now available on Amazon as well as in a range of independent bookshops around the UK.

Moving to Canada from the US

Looking for a fresh start? Being relocated for work? Dreaming of a new home, surrounded by glorious scenery? Canada could be the place for you. Stereotypes aren’t something we usually side with, but Canada’s is frequently spot on – lovely, polite people, with a passion for maple syrup.

Of course, there are other benefits to moving to Canada from the US. Below, we’ll discuss different prices you can expect to encounter during the big move, as well as looking at what Canada has to offer you (other than its endless multitude of lakes and mountains).

Cost of shipping to Canada

Looking at the overall cost of everything is enough to put anyone off moving abroad, but fear not – moving to Canada need not be as costly as you think. We’ve calculated the average international shipping rates, along with the duration of travel , for our most popular Canada/US routes – including from both the east and west coasts of America.

The rates are sourced from WorldFreightRates.com, and are based on the port-to-port transportation of a 20ft container of used furniture worth $53,620 – the typical value of the contents of a three-bedroom house (according to Admiral Insurance ). These prices are correct as of October 2020.

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The durations are sourced from SeaRates.com, and are also correct as of October 2020.

Route Cost Duration
New York to Montreal $422.17 — $466.60 4 days
New York to Vancouver $2,574.54 — $2,845.54 19 days
New York to Halifax $450.24 — $497.63 1-2 days
Los Angeles to Montreal $2,485.32 — $2,746.97 19 days
Los Angeles to Vancouver $512.02 — $565.92 3 days
Los Angeles to Halifax $2,650.98 — $2,930.03 17 days

Please note: these container shipping costs exclude typical add-ons such as door-to-door delivery, professional packing/unpacking, and basic insurance cover. Our shipping suppliers normally incorporate these services into their prices, so expect some discrepancy between the rates given here and the quotes you receive. These estimates should be used as an indication only.

1 Bedroom

2 Bedroom

3+ Bedroom

Select the size of your move to get free quotes

Cost of flying from the US to Canada

You might have noticed that the US isn’t that far away from Canada. Considering the relatively short distance between your old home and new home, you might be thinking about flying your belongings over, rather than shipping. Although air freight can be up to seven times more expensive than container shipping, if time is of the essence, this might be the best option for you. Check out some examples of air freight prices below:

Route Cost Duration
New York — Montreal $2,319.78 — $2,563.96 1 hour
New York — Vancouver $2,319.78 — $2,563.96 7 hours
New York — Halifax $2,319.78 — $2,563.96 3 hours

Unfortunately, cargo flights are not available from Los Angeles , so if you’re situated on the West Coast, shipping is the best option for you.

When it’s time for you to make the decision between air freight or shipping, it’s worth considering what’s best for your situation. If you’re pushed for time, consider air freight – but if you’re not in any rush, shipping your belongings will be much cheaper, and much better for your carbon footprint.

Cost of living in Canada

It’s not just the getting there that can be costly – living costs also make a difference while you’re setting up camp at your new home. Before you move to a new country, no matter how near or far it is from your old home, it’s handy to get a head start and scout out the prices for everyday items. Luckily for you, we’ve created a comparison list of all the essentials:

Metric The US Canada
Groceries (milk, bread, rice, eggs, and cheese) $19.99 $25.02
Inexpensive restaurant $15.00 $16.00
Bottle of beer $2.13 $2.70
A trip to the movies $12.00 $13.50
A monthly gym membership $36.12 $48.17

Overall, the cost of living in Canada is higher than what the average American is used to – so it might be a bit of a culture shock at first. That said, these prices are all averages , and wherever you choose to settle might deviate from these results. For example, if you’re used to New York prices and are planning to move to Toronto, you can look forward to a lovely 30% decrease in living costs!

Basically, if you have your heart set on Canada, don’t let the price put you off – it’s all circumstantial.

Public transport in Canada

Before we delve into the stats and figures, there are a few things you might find interesting about Canadian public transit:

  • The average Canadian ismore than twiceas likely to utilize public transportation than the average American.
  • A report was recently released by Redfin that measured the pedestrian-friendliness of different cities , with transit scores calculated based on convenience and frequency of service. With a score of 78, Toronto outranks several large US cities, including Boston (72), Washington D.C. (71) and Philadelphia (67). In fact, so does Vancouver, with a score of 74.
  • Canada’s going green. Canada has recently started introducingelectric buses in several major cities, to reduce the use of fossil fuels. The plan is to replace more than 1,200 existing buses with electric-run ones.


Metric The US Canada
Cost ★★★★ ★★★
Availability ★★ ★★★★
Quality ★★ ★★
Speed ★★ 1/2 ★★ 1/2

These stars are based on an overview of reviews across multiple aggregator websites, including Tripadvisor, Which?, and Redfin.

Driving in Canada

Not too fond of the idea of sweaty trains and busy buses? Well, a lot of people in Canada can’t live without their car either – in fact, 22.4 million Canadians own a car (that’s two thirds of the country). It can be a less stressful way of getting around, but at what cost?

On average, Canadians are spending between $8,600 and $13,000 a year on buying and maintaining their car . Of course, this will vary with each car, but due to strong weather conditions in certain areas of the snowy country, you might want to opt for a trusty vehicle.

As for gas? Compared to prices in the US, your car will unfortunately be eating away at your bank account once again, as fuel can cost up to 30% more in Canada than it does in the US. So, if you find yourself struggling with travel, it might be worth swapping your four-wheeled friend for one of those busy buses.

Cost of utility bills in Canada

The US has the edge when it comes to cost so far, but what about utility bills? We imagine that if you’re thinking about moving north of the border, you’ll want to know how much your daily lifestyle will affect your bills. Check out some of the price ranges you can expect to see on a monthly basis:

Metric The US Canada
Gas $70 — $80 $125 — $150
Water $35 — $70 $15 — $35
Electricity $100 — $110 $125 — $200
Internet $60 — $70 $35 — $70

On par with the other expenses we’ve run through, Canada is the more expensive option for utility bills . Of course, utility bills in each place will vary in price – especially gas bills in America, where you have the likes of different climates in Alaska and Texas within the same country. After all, people in colder climates are likely to spend more on their heating than those in hotter climates.

If you’re willing to fork out a little extra each month, you can still enjoy all the benefits Canada has to offer – you might just have to keep an eye on that pesky thermometer.

Climate in Canada

Although Canada is usually associated with a constant state of winter, the reality is that Canadians get to experience the same four seasons as the rest of the world. Throughout the summer, you can expect to see temperatures rising as high as 35°C , while during the depths of the extreme winters, you can expect to see lows of -25°C . Time to wrap up warm!

Of course, this all depends on where abouts in Canada you’re planning on relocating, so there’s no need to start packing your snow boots yet.

Does it snow in Canada?

In some areas of The Great North, yes, it snows a lot . Again, it depends where you’re thinking of moving to, but if you’re moving to Canada, generally the winters are very snowy. If you’re not too fond of the idea of moving to somewhere where it’s -25°C, but adore the scenic lifestyle it can bring, check out the areas with the least amount of snow below:

Housing costs in Canada

Housing costs are rising all over the globe – but what can you expect to pay when it comes to your new Canadian home? Major cities are of course the most expensive places to live in every country, but don’t let that stop you from living the high life under the city lights – here is a comparison of housing prices in the three major cities in Canada:

Cost Vancouver Montreal Toronto
1 bedroom flat / rent $1,607.44 $784.00 $1,723.44
3 bedroom flat / rent $2,693.32 $1,326.07 $2,524.57
Buying / meter ² $9,400.89 $3,265.98 $8,487.22

So, if you’re hoping to move to one of Canada’s larger cities, but need to budget like crazy, perhaps opting for a smaller city like Montreal would work for you.

Not thinking about moving to one of the major cities in Canada? Check out our graph below of the most expensive places in Canada to live:

  • The average cost of a house in Canada: $494,978 (compared to $226,800 in the US)
  • The average cost of an apartment in Canada: $990 per month (compared to $1,216 in the US)
  • Cheapest place to live in Canada: Trois-Rivieres, Quebec

The best neighborhoods in Canada

Do you envision yourself living in solace up in the mountains? Or would you be better suited to a life of street lights and nightlife? In Canada, you’re well and truly spoilt for choice, so take your pick! We’ve picked out the best places to live, based on your interests – hopefully we’ll find you a match made in heaven.

Best for families: Ottawa

Moving abroad is daunting in itself, let alone when you have little ones to think about – but as one of the six largest cities in Canada, you can be sure that Ottawa will have everything you need for your family. This beautiful area of Canada provides a wonderful standard of life for all ages, lavished with green parks, libraries, peaceful canals, and great transport links (with a fifth of the population taking buses to work).

One of the highlights of Ottawa that’s grabbing parents’ attention is the low crime rate in the city – in fact, Global News carried out a study of 2,000 Canadians to find out where they feel the safest, and Ottawa came out on top.

  • Population: 999,183
  • Percentage of Families With Children: 28%

Best for students: Montreal

This one was tough – Toronto or Montreal? Although Toronto has the higher ranking universities out of the two, we gave Montreal the edge.

It has been voted the best city for students for a multitude of reasons – i t has a wonderful range of educational facilities, a fantastic public transport system, vibrant nightlife, diverse culture, and breathtaking scenery. So, whether you’re looking for a quiet place to study, a city with a buzzing nightlife, or both, off to Montreal you go. The city has even been ranked 6th place in QS’s worldwide comparison of the best student city.

  • Population: 4,195,523
  • Amount of students:185,000 students(including 25,000 international students)

Best for singles: Toronto

This refreshing city is home to a diverse set of people, including a large population of younger people aged 15-29. Of these young people, a massive 82% are single.

We know, we know, quality over quantity – but we haven’t chosen this city just because of the amount of singles you’ll be with. Toronto actually came 24th out of 100 cities in a world-w >– so whether you’d like to settle down, or you’re just fed up of swiping and are keen to meet people face to face, Toronto is calling.

Best for hipsters: Vancouver

Hipster culture is ever-growing around the globe – you can now expect to find collections of rustic coffee shops, an abundance of tattooed people, bobbing man buns walking past, and of course, a virtuous amount of vintage shops wherever you decide to move. But where is the best place in Canada to immerse yourself in this culture?

We chose Vancouver, based on a large-scale study we carried out across the globe. The study takes into account the number of microbreweries, thrift stores, vegan restaurants, and tattoo studios per 100,000 city residents, to discover where the most hipsters are cultivating in Canada. Lo and behold, Vancouver came out on top.

Working in Canada

If you’re used to the American way of working, your work-life balance in Canada will be a dream. Working in Canada is much more rewarding than it can be in the US – the country offer maternity and paternity leave, annual leave, and sick pay .

Whilst it’s nice to be reminded that you’re moving to a more work-friendly country, let’s talk figures:

City Average annual Salary
Toronto $59,399
Vancouver $57,523
Montreal $56,438

Figures are in US Dollars, and can be found from Payscale.com

As you can see, across each major city in Canada the average salary hovers over the late-fifties mark. Although this is a relatively generous average, it still pales compared to America, where the average salary in 2020 was $63,179.

Unfortunately, this means you might find yourself a little strapped for cash in the first few months of moving to Canada. Hopefully over time this is something you can adjust to, and you won’t have to think about money so much.

The bustling city life of Toronto, where you can look forward to the highest average salary in Canada!

Working Visas

Now to get down to the nitty-gritty – it’s time to organise all of those exciting documents.

Working visas aren’t impossible to get, and if you’re a skilled worker, you’ll probably pass with flying colors – but there are a few things that are mandatory for you to have. If you’re hoping to move to Canada through a working visa, to be able to apply, you must:

  • Prove to an officer that you will leave Canada when your work permit expires
  • Show that you have enough money to take care of yourself and your family members during your stay in Canada
  • Obey the law , and have no record of criminal activity
  • Not be a danger to Canada’s security
  • Be in good health . A medical exam may be required
  • Not plan to work for an employer listed with the status “ineligible” on the list of employers who failed to comply with a list of conditions . To learn more about these conditions, head over to canada.ca .
  • Provide any other necessary documents to prove you can enter the country

For more information on what you’ll need to get ready in preparation for your working visa, visit Canada.ca . We won’t lie to you, it’s not a quick process – but it will all be worth it once you get settled in your new home.

Best places in Canada for graduate jobs

Struggling to get a job after university is something that almost everyone goes through – but what if we’re just searching in the wrong areas?

To explore this idea a little further, Youthfulcities recently created an Urban Working Index for Canadian cities, based on 48 urban work indicators – and you’ll be surprised at the results.

Rather than just the bigger cities coming out on the very top, the place named best for the amount of graduate work opportunities was Edmonton, Alberta , which scored 713.86 points out of a possible 1,310.

Runner-up was Montreal , with a close score of 708.13 – missing the top stop due to its high cost of living. Next up was Ottawa, which took third place with 697.91 points.

So despite what you might think, the major cities aren’t always where you should be looking when you’re applying for graduate jobs . Hopefully these top three places will give you a helping hand when taking the first steps in your career.

Expat healthcare

Canadian healthcare is very different to American healthcare – in fact, it couldn’t be more different. If you are a Canadian citizen, or a permanent resident, you can apply for public health insurance – meaning you won’t have to pay for most healthcare services. These services are all paid through taxes.

But we’ve got some bad news: this only applies to Canadian citizens. Unfortunately for American expats living in Canada, this means you might have to fork out some extra cash each time you’re ill.

Do you need private healthcare?

Generally speaking, expats have limited access to free medical care, and will likely have to pay for treatment or sign up for private healthcare.

One way around this, if you plan on living in Canada for a long period of time, is to become a citizen! To actually become a Canadian citizen, you’ll need to have lived in the country for at least six years. You must stay on your best behavior, and you’ll need to complete an exam on Canada before you can call it home.

This is a long process, and only really works if you’re planning on staying in Canada for a while, but it’s not all doom and gloom. If you’re lucky, your employer might be able to prov > Although this is usually only in larger companies, it’s worth looking into. Fingers crossed…

Schools in Canada

Canada has a very good reputation for its education facilities – in fact, on the most recent Programme for International Assessment (PISA) tests, Canada ranked 4th overall globally – the US, by contrast, trailed behind in 31st. Rest assured – in Canadian schools, your children will be in safe hands.

Want your children to be taught by the best of the best? Check out the best public and private schools in Canada below.

Best public school

Al-Risala academy – This academy has three different schools under one roof: Montessori, elementary, and high school. The academy strives to nurture, cultivate, and foster creativity within its students. It was even ranked first place out of all the schools in Ontario.

Best private school

Appleby college – This prestigious private school is a boarding school for both boys and girls, and is renowned for its innovation and success rate. You’ll be pleased to know that Appleby prov >meaning that students come from a variety of backgrounds.

Conclusion

Moving to your neighboring country is a brave, exhilarating decision to make – one that will benefit you whether you’re a singleton, bringing your family along, in it for the city life, or in it for the nature.

You can look forward to a glorious new home in a climate you’re more familiar with – or something a little on the chillier side – as well as excellent schooling and universities and top notch transport.

If you’d like to get free quotes for shipping your belongings to your new Canadian homestead, fill in this form and begin your adventure in The Great North.

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Moving to Canada, explained

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Maybe, watching election results come in, you’re beginning to think about that joke you made months ago.

Maybe you really should move to Canada.

In 2020, you’re not alone: The Canadian government’s immigration website crashed the day after Donald Trump swept the Super Tuesday primaries, under the force of thousands of Americans Google searching «move to Canada.»

But moving to Canada is harder than it seems. I am here to explain it to you.

To a certain extent, we’ve been here before. «Moving to Canada» is a recurring threat among American progressives — because of the romantic image of Canada as a place that’s like America, without the parts of America progressives don’t like.

The problem for anyone who’s already packing her bags and learning to spell things with extra u’s is that — spoiler alert — the Canadian commitment to tolerance and humanitarianism that makes it so appealing to American progressives also makes it really hard for Americans to move to Canada in the year 2020. And that raises questions, in turn, about the difference between people who get to consider leaving the US in the event of a Trump presidency, and people who’d actually be at risk under a President Trump.

Canada: a haven for Americans who can’t stand America anymore

In the American imagination, Canada is a more liberal, more European version of America: more polite, less religious, more cosmopolitan, and with government-run health care.

And whenever it looks like American politics are shifting to the right, American progressives start joking about shifting to the north.

Screenshot via Zack Beauchamp/Vox

Progressives’ Canadian romance managed to persist even when Canada was being run by its previous prime minister, Conservative Stephen Harper.

Neda Maghbouleh and her husband moved to Canada in 2013, to take positions at the University of Toronto. They hadn’t been planning to leave the US when they started looking on the academic job market — they were just trying to get jobs.

«But then once we actually showed up,» she told me in March, «it was like, ‘You’re going to take this job from my cold, dead hands. We’re not going back!’ We truly fell in love with Toronto, and Canada more broadly.»

But most Americans who move to Canada are like Maghbouleh — they’re moving for the typical reasons people move from one country to another, for a job or to be near family, not because they’re fed up with the political choices of the rest of the electorate. The spike in Google interest after George W. Bush’s reelection in 2004 didn’t translate to a spike in actual American emigration.

American immigration to Canada rose throughout the Bush administration, but the overall pattern of immigration seems pretty independent of election cycles and media hype.

Donald Trump might be the threat Americans needed to get out of dodge

This time, people could be serious.

The stars (or at least the electoral cycles) have aligned to encourage Americans to start dreaming of Canada again. Last fall, Harper was replaced with the dreamily good-looking, meme-ably progressive Justin Trudeau. And Obama is rounding out his term in office — to be replaced by someone who’s certainly less exciting than Trudeau to American liberals, and possibly by Donald J. Trump.

«It’s almost like a lot of Americans are embarrassed» by the rise of Trump, says Chris Reid, the founder of Canadian startup Sortable, explaining the sudden popularity of jokes about moving to his country.

«Just the whole thing seems bizarre. And that’s why we thought, ‘Oh, we should do some bizarre recruiting around it'» — placing Facebook ads encouraging American engineers to come work at Sortable and escape the Trump.


A Facebook ad from the Canadian startup Sortable, encouraging Americans to escape Donald Trump by applying to work for Sortable.

The morning after Super Tuesday, so many Americans Googled «Move to Canada» that it overloaded the website of Canada’s immigration agency. A Morning Consult/Vox poll found that 15 percent of voters would be very likely to «consider leaving the country» if Trump gets elected (though it didn’t specify whether that country would be Canada).

It’s officially hit the phase in the meme life cycle where it’s being co-opted by brands. Spotify pulled together a «Moving Up to Canada» playlist, featuring «Run Away With Me» (by Canadian Carly Rae Jepsen) and Justin Bieber’s «Sorry,» which is doubly Canadian because, as all Americans know from pop culture, Canadians apologize all the time.

Canada has a history of taking American refugees — from things like slavery and the Vietnam War

The idea of Canada as the promised land for embattled Americans — the land of the free, only freer — started among the people for whom America wasn’t the land of the free to begin with. Some escaped slaves before the Civil War fled north not just to free states but to Canada (then a British colony).

Canada became a particularly appealing option for refugees from slavery after 1850, when Millard Fillmore signed the Fugitive Slave Act — which allowed slave owners and bounty hunters to recapture slaves who’d escaped to the North, and made it illegal for abolitionist Northerners to protect them.

With the harassment, capture, and servitude of ex-slaves (or free blacks) elevated from sectional policy to national policy, Canada became the only safe place for black Americans to go. As many as 20,000 African Americans migrated to Canada between 1850 and 1860 — increasing the black population of the colony by 50 percent. (Meanwhile, some northern states, like Connecticut, actually lost black residents.)

No one, thank heavens, is comparing Americans fleeing a putative Trump (or Clinton) administration to Americans fleeing actual slavery. It’s more likely that the modern trope of «moving to Canada» has its roots in a more recent American exodus: draft dodgers fleeing the Vietnam War.

American draft dodger Alex Scala, in Canada. (Bob Olsen/Toronto Star via Getty)

At the end of 1969, the American government started using a draft lottery to conscript thousands of young men into service in Vietnam — a war that Americans increasingly viewed as a mistake. The Canadian government, meanwhile, had passed a law two years earlier that allowed someone to arrive in Canada as a visitor, then apply for permanent residency once there.

The combination of the two presented would-be American draftees who didn’t want to fight (and didn’t have better options to get out of the draft) with an appealing, if illegal, solution: fleeing to Canada as fugitives.

One Canadian estimate says that between 30,000 and 40,000 Americans fled to Canada over the course of the war (from 1965 to 1975). Many of them stayed even after President Jimmy Carter formally pardoned draft dodgers in 1977, allowing them to return to the US safely. A Canadian government report on the country’s immigration history calls them «the largest, best-educated (immigrant) group this country had ever received.»

But what’s often lost in the draft dodgers’ history is that Canadian laws were attracting people from lots of other countries at that time, not just the US. Only for two years during the war (1971 and 1972) was America the country sending the most emigrants to Canada. And when Canada implemented an amnesty in late 1973, allowing 39,000 people to become residents, only a little more than a quarter of them were American — only a couple thousand more Americans got amnesty than natives of Hong Kong.

Emigrating to Canada is pretty easy … if you have a job there already

Canada has firmed up its laws since 1973 — if you’re going to emigrate there, you’re going to need to get your papers in order first. But what it values in immigrants (and the types of immigrants it chooses) has stayed largely the same.

Canada encourages highly educated, technically skilled people to settle in the country, while also carving out a place for humanitarian refugees. This is a pretty big difference from the American immigration system, whose first priority is family reunification. (Indeed, many pro-business Republicans like Rep. Raul Labrador have tried to push America to be more like Canada when it comes to immigration — the only time you’ll ever hear them say something like that.)

This is great news for Americans who can manage to find jobs in Canada before they arrive. A skilled immigrant with a job offer in the US still has only a slim chance of actually getting into the country — for the past several years, the government’s had to hold a lottery because it’s gotten twice as many applications on the first day visas are available as there are visas to hand out.

A skilled immigrant with a job offer in Canada, however, has a much easier time of it. «If you can show that you can’t hire the talent and you have the talent,» says Chris Reid of Sortable, «I think the government wants to support bringing people in. Because they’re going to be paid well, they’re going to be contributors, they’re going to be typically highly educated.»

It’s not a sure thing — there are still a limited number of economic immigrants the country will accept. But the Canadian government reassures employers that «[c]andidates with a valid job offer or provincial/territorial nomination will quickly receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence.» It doesn’t hurt that instead of putting hard caps on the number of immigrants who can come under particular categories, like the US does, Canada sets «targets.»

Even before getting a formal Invitation to Apply, a US citizen with a job offer in a technical field in Canada and a work permit can simply cross the border and stay in the country for up to three years — thanks to a provision in NAFTA. (That’s what Neda Maghbouleh and her husband did.)

If you, say, have tech skills, finding a job in Canada might not be hard. «We’re not the only Canadian company recruiting Americans,» says Reid, «especially in the tech space.» (His company is going to hire between 15 and 30 engineers in 2020; «it’s not like we’re Google or anything.»)

But if you’re moving to Canada to escape Trump first and ask questions later, you might not have a job lined up. And this is where things get tricky.

In which I try, and fail, to qualify for residency in Canada

The good news is that Canada makes it incredibly easy to figure out if you qualify for easy immigration — the main way that skilled workers get admitted to Canada as permanent residents. (You can also get admitted to Canada by being sponsored by a particular province — but the provinces use similar criteria, so the national website is a not-terrible guide to that, too.) And if you have a four-year degree and speak English well enough to read this article, Canada probably considers you a skilled worker.

The bad news is that you may very well find out that you don’t qualify.

When the Canadian government told me I could not move to Canada.

Canada uses a points system to figure out who qualifies for «Express Entry» — which is the pool employers can use to hire people, and from which the government accepts (some) skilled immigrants who don’t yet have job offers. The points system is supposed to score how well you’ll integrate in Canada (with factors like language and «adaptability») and how much you can contribute to the Canadian economy (via education, experience, employment, and age).

Crucially, if you don’t already have a job offer in Canada, it also looks at whether you have enough money saved up to support yourself until you find one. This is where I washed out. I don’t have $9,199 US ($12,184 Canadian) in cash savings — and that’s the bare minimum to qualify for Express Entry.

In the service of journalistic enterprise, I went through the process again and — sorry, Canada! — pretended I had the requisite savings. With that out of the way, I managed to make it through.

That doesn’t, however, mean that if you have more savings than I do as a young journalist, you can get into Canada on a breeze.

The points system heavily favors younger workers and penalizes older ones. That puts a big hitch in the system: The people who are most likely to have accrued savings, graduate or professional degrees, and work experience have much higher standards to meet. I’m qualified for Canadian residency as a 28-year-old, but I wouldn’t qualify, with my equivalent experience, at the age of 42.

Most importantly, Express Entry is just a pool of potential immigrants — you have a better chance than most of getting into the country, but you’re still limited by the targets the government sets. And this year, the government of Canada is making it much harder for skilled immigrants to come — for a reason that any American who wants to go to Canada to begin with can hardly get mad about.

Canada is making it harder for Americans (and other immigrants) to come so it can take in more Syrian refugees

Prime Minister Trudeau has made a big deal out of Canada welcoming thousands of refugees from Syria. (He even met Syrian refugee children at the airport, as you may have seen if you know any progressive women between the ages of 20 and ever.)

And his government is working aggressively to put that in place. It is basically doubling the amount of «refugee and humanitarian» immigrants it’s admitting, raising its target from 29,900 in 2015 to 59,400 in 2020.

But those slots have to come from somewhere. In particular, they’re coming out of the allotments for economic immigrants — particularly skilled immigrants.

Canada is planning to cut the number of economic immigrants it allows in 2020 by about 11 percent. And while there isn’t exactly an apples-to-apples comparison for the programs that work through the Express Entry pool, the best estimates are that Canada will admit 20 percent fewer highly skilled immigrants at the federal level this year than it did last year.

This probably isn’t going to be a one-year thing, either. There are a lot of Syrian refugees out there, and the number of highly skilled immigrant admissions has kind of been leveling off anyway.

It’s impossible to overstate how ironic this is. The fact that Canada welcomes Syrian refugees, while American governors have been fighting to reject them, is exactly the sort of thing that makes some Americans want to move to Canada to begin with.

Canadians think your «asylum» jokes are cute, but give them a break

It’s tempting, from this side of the US/Canada border, to think of fleeing to Canada as a refugee act: Surely a Trump administration would be so terrible that it would count as persecution, or at least as a humanitarian outrage on the level of the draft.

It is vanishingly unlikely that an American could successfully claim asylum in Canada. The country has granted it to exactly one US national in each of the past two years. Even then, as a spokesperson for the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada explained, it’s probable that the asylum seeker in question was a child of people who were seeking asylum because they were persecuted in another country — not someone who was claiming to have been persecuted in the US.

Could that change under a Trump administration? Possibly. But as Neda Maghbouleh points out, Canada’s commitment to honest-to-goodness refugees makes Canadians a lot less sympathetic to the idea that «life under President Trump» constitutes humanitarian persecution.

Welcome bags assembled by a Canadian group for Syrian refugees. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty

«There is so much support for the government facilitating the migration of Syrian refugees here,» Maghbouleh says, «There is actually a real day-to-day connection people have with Syrian refugees or other people who are sponsored migrants.

«Because that’s very realistic and that’s something you can see evidence of all day, it almost makes the American pathway for refugee status even more silly, in a way. Because the refugees that are being sponsored now are coming from such tremendous chaos and trauma. I don’t see people talking about the American thing in a realistic way, because we have evidence all around us of what refugee-ism looks like around the world.»

The people who’d be under the most danger aren’t the people who can move, or joke about it

This isn’t to say that a President Trump wouldn’t necessarily pose a genuine threat to anyone. But the people to whom he’d pose the biggest threat aren’t the ones making «move to Canada» jokes — they’re the ones who already fear for their safety.

«All my friends, no matter what their racial background, make jokes on social media,» says Maghbouleh. «But the people who have reached out to me to have a substantive conversation about ‘I want to get out of here,’ the common denominator, no matter what industry they’re in or whether they’re women or men or whatever, they’re people from racialized communities.»

Would you be as happy as this man is? Really? Melissa Renwick/Toronto Star via Getty

That includes Maghbouleh’s own parents, who are Iranian immigrants living in Oregon. «I’m literally scared for them sometimes,» she says. When she formally got permanent Canadian residency, in March, the first thing she did was Google «how to sponsor grandparents» (on behalf of her Canadian-born child). But because Canada doesn’t treat family reunification as a high priority, it will take until 2022, or later, for her to bring them over. «We’re going to have to make it work,» she told her parents, «because I’m not going to be able to get you here until after the next president has served their first term.»

The recruiters at Sortable are actually operating on similar logic. Yeah, they’re open to recruiting Americans — but their chief target is actually immigrants in America who want an easier path to citizenship (and a bigger guarantee of safety). «That demographic is a little more open to it,» says Chris Reid.

In general, though, the immigrants coming to Canada from Silicon Valley aren’t the ones who need protection either. «The Americans I see here are like professors. Or they’re people who work for Google,» says Maghbouleh. They’re «the people who would have been insulated from a lot of the BS that’s going to happen in the US.»

As for the people who won’t be insulated … they’ll have a much harder time getting to Canada. Under Canadian law, non-US citizens can’t leave the US to claim asylum in Canada — they’re supposed to apply for asylum in the US first, since Canada has designated it a «safe country.» And because the people who’d be most vulnerable under President Trump often aren’t fluent in English, or highly educated, the Express Entry pathway isn’t going to be as open to them either.

If the people who have the luxury of fleeing from the US to Canada were to, somehow, do so en masse, they’d be leaving the vulnerable ones behind.

«We’re the ones who get to come to Canada,» Maghbouleh sums up. «We’re the people who needed this pathway into Canada the least.»

Clarification: This article has added an explanation of the «NAFTA visa» that allows US citizens with job offers in technical fields to enter Canada for up to three years.

Keen to move to Canada? Here are some things to cons > By Jasmine Taylor-Coleman BBC News

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At first it was the Americans. A record number of people in the US searched on Google for how to move to Canada after Donald Trump won seven out of 11 Republican primaries on Super Tuesday in March.

More recently people in the UK have been joining the party. In the days after Britain voted to leave the European Union by 52% to 48%, Google searches for «move to Canada» hit an all-time high.

Although many voters are looking forward to their country leaving EU regulations behind, other disillusioned Brits began considering a future abroad. And according to Simon Rogers, data editor for Google News Lab, one of the top options was Canada.

No doubt some will be attracted by the country’s breathtaking scenery and wide-open spaces (it is the second largest country in the world). Canadians are famous for being friendly to strangers, and the government prides itself on being welcoming to immigrants. And then there is Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who has been winning fans worldwide with press-ups, photos with pandas and knowledge of quantum computing.

But surely there are some drawbacks?

Many of those surveyed for this BBC article made it clear they thought Canada was a great place to be.

But here are a few aspects of life in the country that might just make some Brits and Americans think twice about a move.

It should come as no surprise that areas of Canada can get very cold in the winter — temperatures can drop to -40C (-40F) with severe wind chills.

But even when the weather gets warmer there is another reason in some places to stay inside.

As well as non-biting midges, Canada has dozens of species of mosquitoes across its territories which have adapted to the harsh climate.

«When I moved here, nobody mentioned the mosquitoes,» says Ollie Williams, a BBC Sport reporter who relocated to Canada’s Northwest Territories in 2014.

«I had no idea. For some reason, I had in mind that a place that’s frozen for more than half the year can’t be home to bloodthirsty insects the size of your thumb.

«I was very wrong about this. It turns out the mosquitoes just cryogenically freeze themselves all winter, then pop back out in spring, ready to obliterate all exposed skin when you try to take the dog out at night.»

Cost of living

It is something Americans will be well-accustomed to, but Brits could get a «mild surprise» when they see the extra charges such as sales tax and gratuity added to their bill, says Ollie Williams.

«Whatever price you see printed is lower than the price you are going to end up paying at the till,» he says. «Why inflict this maths exercise on the population? Why not just tell us the final price on the label as is the case in the UK?»

Meanwhile the price of daily groceries is dependent on how the Canadian dollar is performing against the US dollar. Since the majority of fruit and vegetables consumed in Canada are imported, they are vulnerable to currency fluctuations.

The cost of fresh produce «skyrocketed» at the start of 2020, says Rob Carrick, personal finance columnist at Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper. «People were shocked about how much they were spending.»

Since then prices have levelled out, he says, but there are other areas where new arrivals may feel the pinch.

Americans would find petrol more expensive, despite Canada being a major oil producer, with a litre costing about US $0.91 compared to US $0.67 in the US. But people from the UK, where a litre of petrol costs about US $1.45, would be more likely to be surprised by the cost of beer, wine and spirits, which — like petrol — is heavily taxed. Depending where you are in Canada, liquor laws also restrict where alcohol can be bought and consumed.

Housing market

Soaring housing prices in the cities of Vancouver and Toronto are making ownership unattainable for more and more people. And concern is growing that the housing bubble could crash. In April, Canada’s national housing agency said nine of the country’s 15 largest housing markets were showing signs of being overvalued.

The average price of properties in Vancouver rose more than 32% in the past year to $917,800 (US $700,000; £550,000) the Real Estate Board Of Greater Vancouver said this month.

And the Toronto Real Estate Board said in June that the average price of a house in Toronto had increased by nearly 17% in a year to $775,400 (£460,000).

«Two of the most interesting cities to live in have extraordinarily expensive housing markets,» says Rob Carrick.

«There are enough really affluent people to buy these properties, but lower and middle-class people are getting increasingly priced out.»

For comparison, the average house price in the UK’s most expensive city, London, was about £472,384 in June, a 9.9% increase on the previous year.

Some experts say economic fallout from the UK’s Brexit vote could bring more foreign buyers to Canada and sustain the rapid growth. But for many people in the country the prospect of owning a place is getting further and further away.

Some reasons why people DO move there

  • Healthy lifestyles
  • Scenery
  • Friendly reputation
  • LGBT rights
  • Longer maternity leave
  • Opportunities for women (even the cabinet is gender balanced)

Inequality

Wealth is increasingly concentrated among the super-rich. In Canada, the average income of the top 10% of earners is 8.6 times higher than that of the bottom 10%, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The gap between rich and poor is not as wide as in the UK and the US, but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged to tackle the issue in his election campaign last year.

His government’s first budget included a tax cut for people earning between about $45,000 and $90,000, but critics have urged him to do more.

Meanwhile reports of mass suicide attempts in the First Nations community of Attawapiskat in Ontario in April brought renewed attention to the high levels of poverty and isolation experienced by Canada’s 1.4 million indigenous people.


PM still proving himself

Justin Trudeau was elected on a wave of so-called Trudeau-mania, and in the nine months since, his international popularity has shot up.

Much of the media attention has focused on the 44-year-old’s athleticism and photogenic appeal. And despite some hiccups — including unusually strong criticism after he «manhandled» an MP, and accidentally elbowed another — his popularity remains high.

But commentators say it is too early to tell how successful he will be at governing the country.

«He has a ‘pretty boy’ image to shake off,» says Canadian writer and blogger Lauren Messervey. «In my opinion, this has been more to his detriment than to his success.

«Trudeau has had to take himself to task and prove to governing officials, public opinion, and international leaders that he is more than just a pretty face.

«So far, in regards to his flair for inspiring people to the edge of excitement, he has been doing quite an excellent job. Then again, time will tell on his power as a governing official.»

Moving to Canada, explained

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Maybe, watching election results come in, you’re beginning to think about that joke you made months ago.

Maybe you really should move to Canada.

In 2020, you’re not alone: The Canadian government’s immigration website crashed the day after Donald Trump swept the Super Tuesday primaries, under the force of thousands of Americans Google searching «move to Canada.»

But moving to Canada is harder than it seems. I am here to explain it to you.

To a certain extent, we’ve been here before. «Moving to Canada» is a recurring threat among American progressives — because of the romantic image of Canada as a place that’s like America, without the parts of America progressives don’t like.

The problem for anyone who’s already packing her bags and learning to spell things with extra u’s is that — spoiler alert — the Canadian commitment to tolerance and humanitarianism that makes it so appealing to American progressives also makes it really hard for Americans to move to Canada in the year 2020. And that raises questions, in turn, about the difference between people who get to consider leaving the US in the event of a Trump presidency, and people who’d actually be at risk under a President Trump.

Canada: a haven for Americans who can’t stand America anymore

In the American imagination, Canada is a more liberal, more European version of America: more polite, less religious, more cosmopolitan, and with government-run health care.

And whenever it looks like American politics are shifting to the right, American progressives start joking about shifting to the north.

Screenshot via Zack Beauchamp/Vox

Progressives’ Canadian romance managed to persist even when Canada was being run by its previous prime minister, Conservative Stephen Harper.

Neda Maghbouleh and her husband moved to Canada in 2013, to take positions at the University of Toronto. They hadn’t been planning to leave the US when they started looking on the academic job market — they were just trying to get jobs.

«But then once we actually showed up,» she told me in March, «it was like, ‘You’re going to take this job from my cold, dead hands. We’re not going back!’ We truly fell in love with Toronto, and Canada more broadly.»

But most Americans who move to Canada are like Maghbouleh — they’re moving for the typical reasons people move from one country to another, for a job or to be near family, not because they’re fed up with the political choices of the rest of the electorate. The spike in Google interest after George W. Bush’s reelection in 2004 didn’t translate to a spike in actual American emigration.

American immigration to Canada rose throughout the Bush administration, but the overall pattern of immigration seems pretty independent of election cycles and media hype.

Donald Trump might be the threat Americans needed to get out of dodge

This time, people could be serious.

The stars (or at least the electoral cycles) have aligned to encourage Americans to start dreaming of Canada again. Last fall, Harper was replaced with the dreamily good-looking, meme-ably progressive Justin Trudeau. And Obama is rounding out his term in office — to be replaced by someone who’s certainly less exciting than Trudeau to American liberals, and possibly by Donald J. Trump.

«It’s almost like a lot of Americans are embarrassed» by the rise of Trump, says Chris Reid, the founder of Canadian startup Sortable, explaining the sudden popularity of jokes about moving to his country.

«Just the whole thing seems bizarre. And that’s why we thought, ‘Oh, we should do some bizarre recruiting around it'» — placing Facebook ads encouraging American engineers to come work at Sortable and escape the Trump.

A Facebook ad from the Canadian startup Sortable, encouraging Americans to escape Donald Trump by applying to work for Sortable.

The morning after Super Tuesday, so many Americans Googled «Move to Canada» that it overloaded the website of Canada’s immigration agency. A Morning Consult/Vox poll found that 15 percent of voters would be very likely to «consider leaving the country» if Trump gets elected (though it didn’t specify whether that country would be Canada).

It’s officially hit the phase in the meme life cycle where it’s being co-opted by brands. Spotify pulled together a «Moving Up to Canada» playlist, featuring «Run Away With Me» (by Canadian Carly Rae Jepsen) and Justin Bieber’s «Sorry,» which is doubly Canadian because, as all Americans know from pop culture, Canadians apologize all the time.

Canada has a history of taking American refugees — from things like slavery and the Vietnam War

The idea of Canada as the promised land for embattled Americans — the land of the free, only freer — started among the people for whom America wasn’t the land of the free to begin with. Some escaped slaves before the Civil War fled north not just to free states but to Canada (then a British colony).

Canada became a particularly appealing option for refugees from slavery after 1850, when Millard Fillmore signed the Fugitive Slave Act — which allowed slave owners and bounty hunters to recapture slaves who’d escaped to the North, and made it illegal for abolitionist Northerners to protect them.

With the harassment, capture, and servitude of ex-slaves (or free blacks) elevated from sectional policy to national policy, Canada became the only safe place for black Americans to go. As many as 20,000 African Americans migrated to Canada between 1850 and 1860 — increasing the black population of the colony by 50 percent. (Meanwhile, some northern states, like Connecticut, actually lost black residents.)

No one, thank heavens, is comparing Americans fleeing a putative Trump (or Clinton) administration to Americans fleeing actual slavery. It’s more likely that the modern trope of «moving to Canada» has its roots in a more recent American exodus: draft dodgers fleeing the Vietnam War.

American draft dodger Alex Scala, in Canada. (Bob Olsen/Toronto Star via Getty)

At the end of 1969, the American government started using a draft lottery to conscript thousands of young men into service in Vietnam — a war that Americans increasingly viewed as a mistake. The Canadian government, meanwhile, had passed a law two years earlier that allowed someone to arrive in Canada as a visitor, then apply for permanent residency once there.

The combination of the two presented would-be American draftees who didn’t want to fight (and didn’t have better options to get out of the draft) with an appealing, if illegal, solution: fleeing to Canada as fugitives.

One Canadian estimate says that between 30,000 and 40,000 Americans fled to Canada over the course of the war (from 1965 to 1975). Many of them stayed even after President Jimmy Carter formally pardoned draft dodgers in 1977, allowing them to return to the US safely. A Canadian government report on the country’s immigration history calls them «the largest, best-educated (immigrant) group this country had ever received.»

But what’s often lost in the draft dodgers’ history is that Canadian laws were attracting people from lots of other countries at that time, not just the US. Only for two years during the war (1971 and 1972) was America the country sending the most emigrants to Canada. And when Canada implemented an amnesty in late 1973, allowing 39,000 people to become residents, only a little more than a quarter of them were American — only a couple thousand more Americans got amnesty than natives of Hong Kong.

Emigrating to Canada is pretty easy … if you have a job there already

Canada has firmed up its laws since 1973 — if you’re going to emigrate there, you’re going to need to get your papers in order first. But what it values in immigrants (and the types of immigrants it chooses) has stayed largely the same.

Canada encourages highly educated, technically skilled people to settle in the country, while also carving out a place for humanitarian refugees. This is a pretty big difference from the American immigration system, whose first priority is family reunification. (Indeed, many pro-business Republicans like Rep. Raul Labrador have tried to push America to be more like Canada when it comes to immigration — the only time you’ll ever hear them say something like that.)

This is great news for Americans who can manage to find jobs in Canada before they arrive. A skilled immigrant with a job offer in the US still has only a slim chance of actually getting into the country — for the past several years, the government’s had to hold a lottery because it’s gotten twice as many applications on the first day visas are available as there are visas to hand out.

A skilled immigrant with a job offer in Canada, however, has a much easier time of it. «If you can show that you can’t hire the talent and you have the talent,» says Chris Reid of Sortable, «I think the government wants to support bringing people in. Because they’re going to be paid well, they’re going to be contributors, they’re going to be typically highly educated.»

It’s not a sure thing — there are still a limited number of economic immigrants the country will accept. But the Canadian government reassures employers that «[c]andidates with a valid job offer or provincial/territorial nomination will quickly receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence.» It doesn’t hurt that instead of putting hard caps on the number of immigrants who can come under particular categories, like the US does, Canada sets «targets.»

Even before getting a formal Invitation to Apply, a US citizen with a job offer in a technical field in Canada and a work permit can simply cross the border and stay in the country for up to three years — thanks to a provision in NAFTA. (That’s what Neda Maghbouleh and her husband did.)

If you, say, have tech skills, finding a job in Canada might not be hard. «We’re not the only Canadian company recruiting Americans,» says Reid, «especially in the tech space.» (His company is going to hire between 15 and 30 engineers in 2020; «it’s not like we’re Google or anything.»)

But if you’re moving to Canada to escape Trump first and ask questions later, you might not have a job lined up. And this is where things get tricky.

In which I try, and fail, to qualify for residency in Canada

The good news is that Canada makes it incredibly easy to figure out if you qualify for easy immigration — the main way that skilled workers get admitted to Canada as permanent residents. (You can also get admitted to Canada by being sponsored by a particular province — but the provinces use similar criteria, so the national website is a not-terrible guide to that, too.) And if you have a four-year degree and speak English well enough to read this article, Canada probably considers you a skilled worker.

The bad news is that you may very well find out that you don’t qualify.

When the Canadian government told me I could not move to Canada.

Canada uses a points system to figure out who qualifies for «Express Entry» — which is the pool employers can use to hire people, and from which the government accepts (some) skilled immigrants who don’t yet have job offers. The points system is supposed to score how well you’ll integrate in Canada (with factors like language and «adaptability») and how much you can contribute to the Canadian economy (via education, experience, employment, and age).

Crucially, if you don’t already have a job offer in Canada, it also looks at whether you have enough money saved up to support yourself until you find one. This is where I washed out. I don’t have $9,199 US ($12,184 Canadian) in cash savings — and that’s the bare minimum to qualify for Express Entry.

In the service of journalistic enterprise, I went through the process again and — sorry, Canada! — pretended I had the requisite savings. With that out of the way, I managed to make it through.

That doesn’t, however, mean that if you have more savings than I do as a young journalist, you can get into Canada on a breeze.

The points system heavily favors younger workers and penalizes older ones. That puts a big hitch in the system: The people who are most likely to have accrued savings, graduate or professional degrees, and work experience have much higher standards to meet. I’m qualified for Canadian residency as a 28-year-old, but I wouldn’t qualify, with my equivalent experience, at the age of 42.

Most importantly, Express Entry is just a pool of potential immigrants — you have a better chance than most of getting into the country, but you’re still limited by the targets the government sets. And this year, the government of Canada is making it much harder for skilled immigrants to come — for a reason that any American who wants to go to Canada to begin with can hardly get mad about.

Canada is making it harder for Americans (and other immigrants) to come so it can take in more Syrian refugees

Prime Minister Trudeau has made a big deal out of Canada welcoming thousands of refugees from Syria. (He even met Syrian refugee children at the airport, as you may have seen if you know any progressive women between the ages of 20 and ever.)

And his government is working aggressively to put that in place. It is basically doubling the amount of «refugee and humanitarian» immigrants it’s admitting, raising its target from 29,900 in 2015 to 59,400 in 2020.

But those slots have to come from somewhere. In particular, they’re coming out of the allotments for economic immigrants — particularly skilled immigrants.

Canada is planning to cut the number of economic immigrants it allows in 2020 by about 11 percent. And while there isn’t exactly an apples-to-apples comparison for the programs that work through the Express Entry pool, the best estimates are that Canada will admit 20 percent fewer highly skilled immigrants at the federal level this year than it did last year.

This probably isn’t going to be a one-year thing, either. There are a lot of Syrian refugees out there, and the number of highly skilled immigrant admissions has kind of been leveling off anyway.

It’s impossible to overstate how ironic this is. The fact that Canada welcomes Syrian refugees, while American governors have been fighting to reject them, is exactly the sort of thing that makes some Americans want to move to Canada to begin with.

Canadians think your «asylum» jokes are cute, but give them a break

It’s tempting, from this side of the US/Canada border, to think of fleeing to Canada as a refugee act: Surely a Trump administration would be so terrible that it would count as persecution, or at least as a humanitarian outrage on the level of the draft.

It is vanishingly unlikely that an American could successfully claim asylum in Canada. The country has granted it to exactly one US national in each of the past two years. Even then, as a spokesperson for the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada explained, it’s probable that the asylum seeker in question was a child of people who were seeking asylum because they were persecuted in another country — not someone who was claiming to have been persecuted in the US.

Could that change under a Trump administration? Possibly. But as Neda Maghbouleh points out, Canada’s commitment to honest-to-goodness refugees makes Canadians a lot less sympathetic to the idea that «life under President Trump» constitutes humanitarian persecution.

Welcome bags assembled by a Canadian group for Syrian refugees. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty

«There is so much support for the government facilitating the migration of Syrian refugees here,» Maghbouleh says, «There is actually a real day-to-day connection people have with Syrian refugees or other people who are sponsored migrants.

«Because that’s very realistic and that’s something you can see evidence of all day, it almost makes the American pathway for refugee status even more silly, in a way. Because the refugees that are being sponsored now are coming from such tremendous chaos and trauma. I don’t see people talking about the American thing in a realistic way, because we have evidence all around us of what refugee-ism looks like around the world.»

The people who’d be under the most danger aren’t the people who can move, or joke about it

This isn’t to say that a President Trump wouldn’t necessarily pose a genuine threat to anyone. But the people to whom he’d pose the biggest threat aren’t the ones making «move to Canada» jokes — they’re the ones who already fear for their safety.

«All my friends, no matter what their racial background, make jokes on social media,» says Maghbouleh. «But the people who have reached out to me to have a substantive conversation about ‘I want to get out of here,’ the common denominator, no matter what industry they’re in or whether they’re women or men or whatever, they’re people from racialized communities.»

Would you be as happy as this man is? Really? Melissa Renwick/Toronto Star via Getty

That includes Maghbouleh’s own parents, who are Iranian immigrants living in Oregon. «I’m literally scared for them sometimes,» she says. When she formally got permanent Canadian residency, in March, the first thing she did was Google «how to sponsor grandparents» (on behalf of her Canadian-born child). But because Canada doesn’t treat family reunification as a high priority, it will take until 2022, or later, for her to bring them over. «We’re going to have to make it work,» she told her parents, «because I’m not going to be able to get you here until after the next president has served their first term.»

The recruiters at Sortable are actually operating on similar logic. Yeah, they’re open to recruiting Americans — but their chief target is actually immigrants in America who want an easier path to citizenship (and a bigger guarantee of safety). «That demographic is a little more open to it,» says Chris Reid.

In general, though, the immigrants coming to Canada from Silicon Valley aren’t the ones who need protection either. «The Americans I see here are like professors. Or they’re people who work for Google,» says Maghbouleh. They’re «the people who would have been insulated from a lot of the BS that’s going to happen in the US.»

As for the people who won’t be insulated … they’ll have a much harder time getting to Canada. Under Canadian law, non-US citizens can’t leave the US to claim asylum in Canada — they’re supposed to apply for asylum in the US first, since Canada has designated it a «safe country.» And because the people who’d be most vulnerable under President Trump often aren’t fluent in English, or highly educated, the Express Entry pathway isn’t going to be as open to them either.

If the people who have the luxury of fleeing from the US to Canada were to, somehow, do so en masse, they’d be leaving the vulnerable ones behind.

«We’re the ones who get to come to Canada,» Maghbouleh sums up. «We’re the people who needed this pathway into Canada the least.»

Clarification: This article has added an explanation of the «NAFTA visa» that allows US citizens with job offers in technical fields to enter Canada for up to three years.

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    Играй с одним или четырьмя геймпадами, клавиатурой, ковриком для DDR. или. гитарой и ударными от Guitar Hero. Твой выбор. Хотя мы рекомендуем геймпад 😀
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