US Green Card and Canadian PR Канада


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Canada Green Card: Application for Permanent Residency

Canada doesn’t really have a “green card” per se, but our “Canada Green Card” is similar to a Canadian permanent resident card or permanent resident status.

Like a United States green card holder, a permanent resident of Canada is someone who is foreign born and has immigrated to Canada but is not yet a Canadian citizen. The opportunity to become a Canadian citizen is there, though. Permanent residents can also live and work anywhere in the country, as well as leave Canada and re-enter freely.

There are four main ways to becoming a permanent resident of Canada, and these may be called immigration categories or “streams”. To become a permanent resident, you will need to qualify under any one of these streams.

Frequently Asked Questions About Canadian Green Cards

Does Canada have a Green Card?

Canada’s equivalent to the United States Green Card is a Permanent Resident Card.

If I have a Green Card from the US, can I travel to Canada?

Yes, you will need to have your Green Card and a valid passport. You do not need to apply for a visa.

If I have a permanent resident’s card, can I travel to the United States?

Yes, but you will need a valid passport and a visa. If you are a citizen of a country that is eligible for the Visa Waiver Program, you may not need a visa. Find out more about visiting the United States.

Can I work in the US as a Canadian Permanent Resident?

No, you would need to apply for a visitor’s visa to enter the US and would not be able to work. However, if you apply for and receive full Canadian Citizenship, it is possible to work in the US. Find out more about how Canadian citizens can work in the United States and which professions are covered by NAFTA.

Ways of Obtaining a Canadian Green Card

A Canadian “Green Card” is offically known as Canada’s Permanent Resident Card. The PR (Green Card) Card can be used to show that you have permanent resident status in Canada. If you travel outside of Canada, you will need to show your card and your passport when you come back on a commercial vehicle, like a bus, train, boat or airplane. The immigration streams that can lead to permanent resident status in Canada are:

The Independent/Skilled Worker Category

A skilled worker has skills that make them useful to the Canadian labour market. They generally have higher education or valuable skills, and must have work experience in specific occupations including management occupations, professional occupations or skilled trades. To qualify for the skilled worker program, applicants are assessed using a points system. They earn points for things like their age, language proficiency, work experience and education, and require 67 points out of a possible 100 to qualify.

Business Immigration

Business immigration includes investors and those who are self-employed. Those who are involved in business can apply to the Investor and Business Visa. Self-employed persons must be able to purchase or establish a business in Canada that will contribute to the economy. Investors must be able to invest a specific sum of money in a Canadian business as well as have business experience.

Family Class Immigration

If you have a close relative or spouse who is a permanent resident or a Canadian citizen, they could be eligible to sponsor you to come to Canada and become a permanent resident through Family Class Sponsorship.

Canadian Experience Class

People who come to Canada on a study permit or work permit who are proficient in one of the two official languages and have work experience in Canada may be able to qualify for the Canadian Experience Class. This is because they are familiar with Canadian society and the labour market, and will adjust to life in Canada easily.

Benefits of Becoming a Canadian Permanent Resident And Having a Canada “Green Card”

As a permanent resident of Canada you have the right to:

  • Get most social benefits that Canadian citizens receive, including health care coverage
  • live, work or study anywhere in Canada
  • apply for Canadian citizenship
  • protection under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

As a Canadian Permanent Resident you must pay taxes and respect all Canadian laws at the federal, provincial and municipal levels.

What Permanent Residents Cannot do:

  • vote or run for political office
  • hold some jobs that need a high-level security clearance.

Express Entry

Express Entry is an online immigration application system. It allows individuals to submit a profile and be considered as a skilled immigrant. Candidates with the highest rankings are invited to apply for permanent residency in Canada.

The Canadian government has recognized the fact that Canada requires new immigrants to meet future labour market needs and to help ensure the country’s long-term economic growth and prosperity.

The new Express Entry program will manage applications for permanent residence for immigrants who can fill jobs where there is a lack of available skilled Canadian workers.

Employers will play a key part in selecting economic immigrants, and will be able to access suitable candidates via Canada’s recently improved Job Bank, as well as the relevant provinces and territories where applicable. To learn more, visit our page about Canada’s Express Entry program and find out how to apply!

Do you know if you qualify for a Canadian green card?

Contact us! We can help you determine how best to become a permanent resident in Canada after a FREE online assessment of your case.

About Michael Niren

Michael is a graduate of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Citizenship and Immigration Section and the Associate Member of the American Bar Association. Read more

Hey, I’m a Nigerian. I have no study permit to aid my immigration into Canada. But I really want to come there. I’m not done with University, I’m in my second year, but I don’t mind starting over there. I’m 18. Please how do I go about getting a visa into Canada to study and live there.

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! One of the first steps to obtaining a Canadian study permit is to apply and get accepted into a Canadian university. From there, you may be eligible to apply for a student visa. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

My name is abyy from Kenya am currently a student in the university, in my last semester studying bachelor of business management specializing in risk and insurance management. I have 12 months experience currently..what are my opinions for me to live and work in Canada.I will truly appreciate your assistance.

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! With your academic and work experience, you may be eligible to immigrate to Canada through the Express Entry program. We would be happy to take a closer look at your case to help determine the best pathway for you to live and work in Canada. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

I’m Dorcas Victor Lawal, from Nigeria, I have a National diploma in Tourism management and a degree in Business Administration , I am a professional receptionist I work in a financial institution in Nigeria.
Please I will want to know if I am qualify for Canadian migration?.
Thank you.

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! With your academic and professional experience you may be eligible to immigrate to Canada through Express Entry or another worker program. We would be happy to help guide you through this process and help determine your eligibility. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello,im a us resident and i want to immigrate to canada,what are my options,thanks

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! We would love to help you immigrate to Canada, but first, we need to take a closer look at your case to determine your eligibility for a visa. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello,
This is Chitrank holding INDIAN PASSPORT, is a professional Mech Engg.
Right now I am working with a Company located at Canada as a Consultant.
Can I have opportunity to immigrate there ?
Please help me for same.

Thanks in Advance.

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! You may certainly be able to immigrate to Canada, but we would have to take a closer look at your case to determine your eligibility. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

hello,
my name is mto from Tanzania..
I have 8 years work experience in IT as network engineer or system administrator…plus professional course in IT …which category I can fall with all this information?.

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! With your background in IT, you may be eligible for a visa, and we would love to help you! Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello,
I am 26yrs Sri lankan. i’m working as a speech and language therapist in past 3 years. There, I have already obtained a Bs.c (Speech and hearing sciences ) degree and have started a masters in linguistics this is my second year first semester, and shall be completing in 2020.
What chances do i have to stay and work in Canada in the near future?

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! With your education and work experience, you may be eligible for visas in order to settle down in Canada. First, we need to take a closer look at you and your case. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

I am Harish Hira. Dutch national and living and working as a Manager in registered Garment export Business from past 10 years in Curacao (island- Netherlands Antilles). My daughter is 2 year old and also holds a Dutch passport. My wife holds a Indian passport and had worked in India for 3 years in Branding & Marketing.

What is our chances to work in Canada in near future?

Hi Harish,
Thank you for contacting us here at VisaPlace! With you and your wife’s extensive work experience, you may qualify for a Canadian work visa. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello,
I am a 27yrs Ghanaian, a teacher by profession, worked for almost 10yrs before I gained admission into Islamic University of Madinah, Saudi Arabia in 2014. There, I have already obtained a Linguistics Diploma in Arabic, and have started a Bachelor’s Degree in Islamic Law (Shariah)… in my second semester of first year, and shall be completing in 2020.
I am married with two children, with my wife a Higher Diploma Degree (HND) holder…. What chances do we (I and my family) have to travel, stay, and work in Canada in the near future?
Thanks

Thank you for contacting us at VisaPlace! With your education and work experience, you and your family may be eligible to travel, stay, and work in Canada. First, I need to know more about you and your case. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hi. My name is Michael Karanja. Am a Kenyan living in Nairobi. Am an accountant by profession having over 10 yrs experience. My age is 43. Married with 3 kids. I would love to work and leave in Canada. Kindly advise me.
Thank you

Hi Michael,
Thank you for your inquiry, I’m glad you contacted us! With your advanced work experience, you may qualify for Canadian immigration. We have helped thousands of clients in similar situations like yours, and we may be able to help you! I do need to take a closer look at your case. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions plus it will also increase the chance of approval of the visa you are inquiring. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

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The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

I am an Indian I completed my Bachelors Degree in Computer Science and Engineering and I have nearly 18 months of experience in IT industry and I work for a MNC as a Project Engineer.Can i have chances to get recruited in Canada and to become a Canadian PR.

Thank you for your inquiry. I’m glad you contacted us at VisaPlace! With your education and work experience, you may be eligible for a Canadian visa. I do need to take a closer look at your case. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions, plus it will increase the chance of getting a visa approved. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello Micheal,am ugandan you are doing a great job for the world thank you,i have a master’s degree in public administration and i have working experience of 8 years in people management and customer experience which is the core of an organisation.i want to learn more about Canadian culture and study about early children development as dream career.thank you

Thank you for the kind words about our CEO and our company! You can follow this link to learn more about Canadian immigration: http://www.visaplace.com/canadian-immigration/ Here is some information on migrating as a teacher in Canada: http://www.visaplace.com/blog-immigration-law/canadian-work-visa/migrate-canada-teacher/ if you were interested in working in Canada, you would be required to obtain a Canada Work Visa Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Am Kenyan living in Rwanda would like to apply for a green card. Am married and would like to move with my husband. What are the requirements? Am I eligible?

Thank you for your inquiry, I’m glad you contacted me! Here is some more information on Canadian Permanent Residency: http://www.visaplace.com/canadian-immigration/canada-permanent-residence/ Please Gathoni, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to get you status here in Canada.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

I am a kenyan living in kenya at the moment,i hold a degree business information technology with experience of over 5yrs working with Non-governmental organization English ,am aged 35yrs with a family, am i eligible for any category of visa and greencard i realy love canada.thanks.

I can understand how complicated the process can be very difficult. We have helped thousands of clients in your similar situation of not knowing which visa to choose. I would love to help you during your process of moving to Canada. Hiring an immigration lawyer will increase your chances of being approved for immigration. Please Rashid, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to get you status here in Canada.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

Hello,
My name is Oliver Leon, I am from Caracas, Venezuela. I have a bachelor’s degree in Systems Engineering, I also have an associate degree in Applied Science. I have 3 years of experience as a PHP web developer. I would like to know if I qualify for a Canadian Green Card or if I am eligible for a work visa. I look forward to hearing from you.
Thanks!

Hello Oliver. We will need to know more about the details of your situation. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-416-410-7484 or online at http://goo.gl/JFZqPm
Regards, Muga

I want to come to Canada for management occupation and also will like to do any business there

Hello Charles. We will need to know more about the details of your situation. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-416-410-7484 or online at http://goo.gl/JFZqPm
Regards, Muga

Hello, my name is Seifemichael Getachew i’ m 24 yrs Ethiopian citizen currently pursuing my master’s degree in India,IIT Bombay in Construction management and I have two yrs experience in teaching in higher education and am I eligible for visa under the immigration category?

Hello Seifemichael. We will need to know more about the details of your situation. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-416-410-7484 or online at http://goo.gl/JFZqPm
Regards, Muga

Hello,
I am a US citizen and I am planning to move to Canada permanently. I have an associates in electronics engineering technology and currently I am studying bachelors in electrical engineering technology. How can I apply and what are the opportunities available for me?

Thank You.
Regards,
Arham

Hello Arham. We will need to know more about the details of your situation. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-416-410-7484 or online at http://goo.gl/JFZqPm
Regards, Muga

Hello! My name is Natalia, I’m from Ukraine. I have Master’s Degree in Ecology and Environmental Protection, but worked as a Client Manager in Business School (1 year), and then as a Content Manager (freelancer, 5 months). Also I have 6 years experience as a tutor of English and Ukrainian for little children. Am I eligible for any category of visa and greencard.Thank you!

Hello Nat. There are many factors that need to be evaluated in order to determine your eligibility for the Express Entry immigration program. I am going to suggest that you contact us to make an appointment to talk with one of our immigration professionals who will be able to plan the best strategy for you. You can book an appointment by calling us at 1-855-886-8472 or online at http://goo.gl/JFZqPm
Regards, Muga

Hello!
I am a high school graduate from India. I am interested in studying medicine in canada. I can speak english fluently and understand to the maximum. I am well acquainted with canadian culture. How will I be eligible to study medicine second what are the requirements.
Thank you

Hello Mushtaq. The first step in the study visa process is to get a letter of acceptance from an accredited Canadian learning institution. Once you have your acceptance letter, we can help you obtain the study visa that you will need to come to Canada.
Regards, Muga

I am a kenyan ages 27 na married i have a grade 3 in arc welding with a 5 year experience… Would like to apply for a visa to Canada… Can u help mr out please

Hello Ngugi. You will first need a job offer from a Canadian company. You can search the Canadian job boards such as http://www.monster.ca or http://www.indeed.ca . Once you have your job offer, we can help you obtain the work visa that you will need to come to Canada.
Regards, Muga

I am a kenyan living in kenya at the moment,i hold a diploma in medical laboratory technology with experience of over 10yrs working in hospital environment and a former corrrectional officerfor 5yrs and speak fluent english ,am aged 35yrs with a family, am i eligible for any category of visa and greencard i realy love canada.thanks.

Thank you for your inquiry Francis. I am really glad that you contacted us.

There are many factors that are looked at when determining eligibility.

Please Francis, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to help you achieve your goal.

Hello,
Well, I think I don’t come any of above categories. My problem is something else! Why I want to qualify in the entire proces?
I live in Afghanistan and I’ve gotten a bachelor degree in English literature. I’ve been working with coalition forces in Afghanistan since a year. since I got a job with them, my life is in danger. So I got a question! Can I qualify for this proces? Please inform me. I will appreciate you.
Thanks

There are a lot of challenges in applying for Canadian immigration from Afghanistan. If you dont fall into the immigration categories, it will be difficult. You can contact us for a formal assessment and we can see if there are options for you.
Best
Michael

I am an Indian I completed my Bachelors Degree in Computer Science and Engineering and I have nearly 18 months of experience in IT industry and I work for a MNC as a Project Engineer.Can i have chances to get recruited in Canada and to become a Canadian PR.

Hi Ahmed,
Thank you for your inquiry. I’m glad you contacted us! With your advanced degree and work experience, you may qualify for Canadian immigration. We have helped thousands of clients in similar situations like yours, and we may be able to help you! I do need to take a closer look at your case. Hiring an immigration lawyer will help you get answers to all of your questions plus it will also increase the chance of approval of the visa you are inquiring. Please, complete this form for me http://www.visaplace.com/immigration-assessment/ it is just a quick and easy way for me to learn more details about you and your situation so that I will be able to advise you accurately and determine the best avenue for us to take to give you the best legal advice.

The above response is for informational purposes only and does not form a lawyer-client relationship nor should it be construed to be legal advice.

The content and comments of this blog are not legal advise and and may not be accurate or complete. If you require legal advice, contact a licensed legal practitioner directly. If you post on this blog, you assume full responsibility for disclosing your identity to the public and VisaPlace nor its affiliates are not responsible for protecting your privacy nor your identity concerning your participation in our blog and you assume any risks in participating.

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U.S. and Canadian Immigration Policies: A Comparison

August 19, 2015 by CIC News

The immigration landscape of North America is constantly changing. Canada and the United States, to a large extent, followed parallel trajectories in the earlier parts of their immigration histories. Both countries initially drew principally on migrants from the British Isles and Europe, before expanding their catchment area to other regions of the world. Over time, however, Canadian and U.S. immigration policies have diverged in significant ways.

Immigration issues are in the news in both countries these days, perhaps more so than usual. Canada is in election mode, with many new Canadians expected to vote for the first time. Meanwhile in the United States, a combative Republican Presidential nominee contest, led by the enigmatic Donald Trump, has placed immigration policy to the fore. But what are we really talking about when we talk about immigration? How does Canada differ from the U.S.? This article will present five fundamental ways in which Canadian immigration policy is different from that of the U.S.

1. Canada favours economic immigration.

Around two-thirds of new Canadian permanent residents arrive through economic immigration programs. In contrast, only 16 percent of new Green Card holders (lawful permanent residents, or LPRs) in the U.S. arrive through economic immigration categories. Politicians and commentators in other countries continually point to Canada’s points-based economic immigration as a shining example of a positive, open immigration strategy that creates opportunities for newcomers and Canadians alike.

Sources: Department of Homeland Security, Citizenship and Immigration Canada. U.S. figures are for 2013. Canadian figures are projected for 2015.

2. There is no Diversity Lottery in Canada, but Canada has the Express Entry pool

The Diversity Immigrant Visa program, also known as the Green Card lottery, is a lottery program for receiving a U.S. Permanent Resident Card. Canada has no such program. In 2014, the Green Card lottery attracted more than 11 million applicants. From this pool of applicants less than 0.5 percent were to receive visas, which are allocated at random in a single annual draw. With odds of less than one in two hundred, applicants generally enter the pool of applicants in the Green Card lottery more in hope than expectation.

Canada has its own sort of pool — the Express Entry pool, which came into operation earlier in January, 2015 — where candidates who have made an Expression of Interest in immigrating to Canada are ranked according to a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS). Candidates are selected from the pool on a priority basis, rather than at random, at regular draws from the pool. Selected candidates receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence in Canada, from which point they have 60 days to submit an application, with processing times of six months or less. Within the first few months of Express Entry’s launch a consistently increasing number of candidates in the Express Entry pool have received ITAs, with many of these individuals having quickly gone on to land in Canada as permanent residents. Furthermore, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) recently stated that ‘Future rounds from the Express Entry pool will become the main source of applications to meet annual Canadian immigration levels targets.’

While not everyone is eligible to enter the Express Entry pool, the same is true for the Green Card lottery. The major difference, however, is that individuals presently ineligible to enter the Express Entry pool can become eligible through their own endeavour by improving their language ability, adding supplementary work experience, and/or completing a higher level of education. Applicants to the Green Card lottery, on the other hand, are at the whim of a program that only allows candidates from certain countries to enter, and that’s before the randomness of the draw itself is taken into account.

3. The Provincial Nominee Programs

In Canada, the federal government and the provinces and territories share jurisdiction over the selection of immigrants. Provinces and territories can create and tailor Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) that allow them to nominate individuals who are deemed likely to contribute positively to the community, both socially and economically. The federal government then attends to health and security matters before issuing the permanent resident visa. The PNPs are a dynamic set of programs that fast-track the entrance of newcomers who arrive in their new homes knowing that the region in which they are settling wants them there. Indeed, these newcomers are actively pursued by the provincial governments.

The 50 U.S. state governments do not benefit from such a de-centralized system, however, with immigration jurisdiction remaining exclusively with the U.S. federal government.

4. International students in Canada can stay after graduation

When Mitt Romney was running for President of the U.S. in 2012, he stated “If you get an advanced degree here, we want you to stay here – so we will staple a Green Card to your diploma.” Alas, post-graduation work and immigration options for international students in the U.S. remain scant to this day, with many graduates effectively forced to leave the country soon after graduation. These individuals take with them their ideas, creativity and know-how and use it elsewhere — very often in Canada. In turn, the U.S. loses out on a potentially high-earning tax base.

In contrast, Canada offers its cohort of international students something that is not available, or more difficult to obtain, in other countries — a post-graduation work permit for up to three years. International students who go down this route also benefit from permanent immigration options, including the Canadian Experience Class and the Quebec Experience Class. All of this allows Canada to retain top talent.

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5. A Green Card and Canadian permanent residence are fundamentally different

A Green Card is the popular name for a United States Permanent Resident Card. Instead of a Canada Green Card, permanent residents of Canada have the right to a Canada Permanent Resident Card as proof of their Canada immigration status. The distinction is not a question of semantics; there is a significant difference in the philosophies behind the issuance of a United States Green Card and a Canada Permanent Resident Card.

A Green Card grants the holder the permission to enter and live in the United States. In contrast, Canadian permanent resident status grants an individual the right to enter and live in Canada. Having permission and having the right are two distinct claims. A right is something more — it is a legal entitlement, inherent to the holder. Permanent residents of the United States must be in possession of their U.S Green Cards at all times and must be prepared to show them to U.S. authorities upon request. Canada permanent residents have no such obligation. Not only do they not have to carry around their Canada Permanent Resident Card, they are not even required to apply for the card. Though useful to have, a Canada Permanent Resident Card is purely voluntary.

Why Canada?

“Over the past few years, many American lawmakers have tended to view immigration through the lens of security issues or national sovereignty, rather than as an opportunity to add dynamism and flexibility to the labour market,” says Attorney David Cohen. “The popular image of energetic immigrants arriving on American shores and ‘making it’ through hard work and bright ideas is redundant if the system there won’t allow for it.

“On the other hand, Canada accepts more immigrants per capita than any other country in the Americas. And these people succeed and prosper. They provide for their families, open businesses and create opportunities for others. According to a BMO study, nearly half of all millionaires in Canada are immigrants or second-generation residents, compared to just one-third in America. While in the United States people have been busy pursuing happiness, most of their counterparts in Canada have been busy living it. With a wide range of immigration options, it is the true land of opportunity in North America.”

Can a US green card holder apply for a permanent residence in Canada?

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Answer Wiki

Any person can apply for Permanent Residence in Canda.

It doesn’t matter where you live or what your visa is where you live now. Canada gives preference to young and well educated immigrants.

Here is the full procedure. First, try your luck here:

If this fails you, and you will know in ten minutes, then there is the long and arduous way. Start your process here:

Every step is explained and clear. Just answer ALL the questions honestly.

Be patient, it takes from one to five YEARS to get a visa. I.

17 мифов о лотерее грин-карт, в которые многие до сих пор верят

О лотерее Green Card, заявки на которую принимаются в этом году с 3 октября до 6 ноября, ходит огромное количество слухов, которые значительно усложняют путь в США.

Жительница Украины Алина Голината-Слота, перебравшаяся на постоянное место жительства в США, рассказала о том, как люди упускают свой шанс по причине вымышленных фактов о грин-картах. Подобная подборка ложных слухов появилась и в ее блоге на VOA.

1. Лотерея Green Card на разных сайтах.

Появляется много различных сайтов, на которых якобы можно принять участие в лотерее Green Card. Подобный розыгрыш грин-карт и правда существует. Настоящее его название – Diversity Visa Lottery (DV Lottery).

Единственным местом, где не самом деле принимаются заявки для участия в лотерее, является сайт правительства США https://www.dvlottery.state.gov.

2. В лотерее разыгрывается именно грин-карта.

Победитель лотереи становится претендентом на получение визы в США. И только после прохождения всех этапов вы ее получаете, а вот грин-карта (удостоверение постоянного жителя) окажется у вас только после переезда в США.

3. Победитель гарантировано получит визу в США.

Для начала необходимо собрать и оформить достаточно большое количество документов, а также пройти собеседование с американским консулом. Если же интервью не сложилось или же были выявлены нарушения во время регистрации, то виза не будет выдана.

4. Отправить заявку участника можно почтой.

United States of America permanent resident card, green card, with US flag in the background. Legal immigration concept.

Заявки принимаются исключительно через правительственный портал https://www.dvlottery.state.gov/, где необходимо заполнить онлайн-анкету.


5. Регистрироваться можно в любое время.

Отведен определенный период времени, во время которого электронная система регистрации открыта для всех пользователей – с начала октября до начала ноября. Конкретные даты указаны на официальном сайте правительства, они меняются ежегодно.

6. Участие в лотерее необходимо оплатить.

Подача заявки абсолютно бесплатна. А вот если вам посчастливится стать победителем, то в таком случае придется оплатить консульский сбор и сопроводительные услуги.

United States of America permanent resident card, green card, displayed with a US flag in the background and a passport in the foreground. Immigration concept. Close up with shallow depth of field.

7. Победителей выбирают на основании определенных критерий.

Потому это и называется лотереей, что все заявки обрабатываются компьютером в случайном порядке. Но визы распределяются на 6 географических зон, чтобы у каждой страны было не более, чем 7% от ежегодного количества выданных виз.

Также существуют определенные требования для участия в лотерее. К примеру, минимальный уровень образования. Если таковой отсутствует, то заявка не будет принята к рассмотрению.

8. В этом году Украину не допустили к участию в лотерее.

Это всего-навсего сплетни, поэтому украинцы имеют возможность воспользоваться своим шансом.

А вот некоторые страны попадают в «черный» список в том случае, если оттуда за последние 5 лет в США эмигрировали более 50 тысяч граждан.

9. Любой человек может подать заявку на участие, независимо от того, в какой стране он проживает.

Решающую роль играет не место жительства и даже не гражданство, а место рождения. Поэтому следует проверять, допущена ли ваша страна к участию в лотерее.

10. Иностранцы, которые уже находятся в США, не имеют права участвовать в программе.

Не имеет абсолютно никакого значения, где вы находитесь, ведь все зависит исключительно от места рождения. Если вы уже на территории США, то в таком случае иммиграционная служба меняет ваш текущий статус.

11. Человек может подать всего лишь одну заявку на участие, а шансы у всех равны.

Тут есть небольшой нюанс. На самом деле можно подать всего лишь одну заявку на участие, те, кто отошлет больше, будут дисквалифицированы. Но есть случаи, когда люди получают двойные (а то и тройные) шансы.

Например, супружеская пара может подать две заявки, отдельно указав данные своего партнера. В итоге, если выиграет один из супругов, то визу получат оба. Точно так же обстоит ситуация и с детьми.

12. Лучше доверить заполнение заявки «профессионалам».

Часто люди обращаются в специальные агентства или к консультантам, боясь допустить ошибку, однако на самом деле это неправильно. А опасность в таком случае представляют: ошибки в заявке (каждый ведь может ошибиться); использование ваших данных на протяжении следующих лет; отказ предоставить номер подтверждения регистрации и денежный шантаж.

В Департаменте США акцентируют внимание на том, что участники не должны никому позволять вмешиваться в процесс заполнения заявки для участия в лотерее.

13. Субъект может не упоминать в заявку жену/мужа, с которым планирует развестись, или детей, которые не будут эмигрировать в США.

Вы обязаны предоставить информацию о жене/муже, если на момент заполнения заявки вы официально находитесь в браке. Если вы не живете вместе, то этому должно быть официальное подтверждение суда. Точно так же дело обстоит и с детьми до 21 года. При нарушении этого правила вас ждет дисквалификация.

14. Если субъект уже обратился за иммиграционной визой США другой категории, то он не имеет права участвовать в лотерее.

Каждый имеет право принять участие в регистрации.

15. Победителей выбирают один раз в год.

Иногда в посольстве США специально проводят дополнительные розыгрыши, о которых можно узнать у них на сайте.

16. Извещение победителю приходит по обычной или же электронной почте.

Оповещение о победе или проигрыше можно увидеть только на правительственном портале https://www.dvlottery.state.gov/, где вы подавали заявку. Там необходимо внести персональные данные и номер-подтверждение. Лично никого не оповещают, поэтому сохраняйте номер-подтверждение заявки.

17. Победитель получает жилье и работу в США.

Это уж слишком розовые мечты, ведь никакой помощи вам предоставлять не обязаны. Здесь все совсем наоборот, так как перед получением визы вам необходимо доказать, что вы не собираетесь быть иждивенцем страны.

Подробности о том, как заполнить заявку на участие в лотерее вы можете найти вот по этой ссылке.

Announcement

  • Join Date: Dec 1999
  • Posts: 33534

Maintaining US greencard and Canadian PR

Dear Sir or Madam

I am a permanent resident of Canada (not citizen), I should be there 2 years ( in any way) out of 5 years in order to maintain my permanent resident card, and I am in the US on H-1 visa, if I apply for greencard;

Is it possible to get Greencard in point of view of US immigration organization while having permanent resident card of Canada.

Immihelp Support
No legal advice. Use at your own risk.

  • Join Date: Dec 1999
  • Posts: 33534

But it would be difficult for you to maintain both. Read http://www.immihelp.com/greencard/retain-greencard.html

Immihelp Support
No legal advice. Use at your own risk.

Comment

  • Join Date: Aug 2011
  • Posts: 2

UK and US Green Card maintaining

But it would be difficult for you to maintain both. Read http://www.immihelp.com/greencard/retain-greencard.html

I have same problem i am in UK and my UK PR due Aug 2011 end. I got Immigration visa and travel to US in July 2011. At present I am in UK and family in USA.

Can I apply for UK — PR and Return withn 6 months to US is there any problem. I dont want my family UK PR. So in future if one family member has UK PR we can return to UK.

Is there any problem if I apply for UK PR and return to US within 6 months.

Comment

  • Join Date: Jan 2013
  • Posts: 2

Maintaining US GV and Canadian PR

My parents are in same boat.
My parents are US GC holder since last 14 years. and in US since last 5 years. now they got Canadian PR and they are in Canada on PR status as we applied for their PR in Canada. before coming to Canada on PR they applied for US Citizenship. they have to go back to US for fingerprints and interview/test for citizenship.

does any one have experience on crossing border with both PR and what problem may arise? and best way to cross border ?

appriciate your time in sharing experiences.

Comment

  • Join Date: May 2012
  • Posts: 568

Comment

  • Join Date: Feb 2013
  • Posts: 2

How to maintain US green card while working abroad.

I have been a US permanent resident since mid 2008. In May 2008 since I could not find a job which suits my experience in US, I went back to my home country (i.e. Vietnam) and was employed by a Vietnam company.

My employment term in Vietnam is definite at one year and has been renewed every year up to now. I only received salaries in Vietnam (about 70K a year) and paid my Vietnam income tax during this employment period (i.e. from May 2008 up to now).

During my employment in Vietnam, I make two overseas travels to Vietnam in a year and each travel last about 5.5 months. This means that I only spent relevantly short vacation (less than 2 weeks) in the US during these travels.

I understand that to maintain my US permanent residence status, I need to file my US tax returns as a tax resident. This is not a problem to me as my Vietnam tax credits (at the higher rate of 35%) can be offset against my US tax.

I also understand that a US permanent resident can be deemed to abandon his/her permanent residence status if:

— The permanent resident takes up an employment in a foreign country; and/or
— The permanent resident does not file his US tax returns.

Therefore, I have a dilemma and concern if I decide to fully comply with the above requirement by filing my US tax returns as a tax resident, I will not have US tax payable, but my overseas assignment can be visible to the immigration authorities (via my US tax returns), and I can be deemed to abandon my US permanent residence status (i.e. taking up an overseas employment).

To facilitate your analysis, my mother and my older brother are US citizens and are living in the US.
In addition, I also have my single aunt who is about 82 years old and is living in Vietnam. I got married to my Vietnamese wife in Dec 2011.

I have been maintaining my two US check accounts and few credit cards since 2008. I bought a condo in Chicago in mid of 2010 and paid property taxes since then. I have obtained US driver’s licence, US library card, etc. since 2008.

I plan to return to Chicago to live permanently there in end of this year or when my wife and my newborn son can come to the US together with me (approximately in end of 2014).

I am writing to seek your kind advice on what option should be safe to me for both immigration and tax purposes:

+ Option 1: I should file my US tax returns to comply with both tax and immigration laws, and accept the potential risk that my overseas employment can be visible to the immigration authorities and my permanent residence status can be challenged accordingly? Will taking up an overseas employment (alone) pose any risk to my permanent residence status?

+ Option 2: I should NOT file my US tax returns to avoid the disclosure of my overseas employment to US authorities (including the immigration authorities) and accept the risk that if either the US tax authorities (very less likely as I will not have any US tax payable even when I file my US tax returns as a US tax resident) or the US immigration authorities can discover my overseas assignment, and the US immigration authorities can base on my non-compliance in US tax filing and remove my permanent residence status. How likely is this risk compared the risk under Option 1 (i.e. my overseas employment is disclosed to the US immigration authorities and they can remove my permanent residence status)?

+ Option 3: I should NOT file my US tax returns NOW to avoid the disclosure of my overseas employment to US authorities (including the immigration authorities) and accept the risk that if either the US tax authorities (very less likely as I will not have any US tax payable even when I file my US tax returns as a US tax resident) or the US immigration authorities can discover my overseas assignment, and the US immigration authorities can base on my non-compliance in US tax filing and remove my permanent residence status. I will back-file my US tax returns when I return to Chicago to live permanently in end of 2013. Is this option better than Option 2 as I fully comply with US tax laws? Is there any risk that the immigration authorities can base on my back-filing of US taxes (i.e. I used to take up an employment in overseas) and challenge my permanent residence status.

My question is what option I should take to comply with US laws without posing any risk to my permanent resident status? Please explain pros and cons of each option.

Comment

  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Posts: 15

Yes, it is possible to navigate both US and Canadian PR simultaneously. I’ve done it. On the other hand, it’s probably not a good idea. The whole ordeal was a severe stress at the time and I’ve probably spent all told about $30k on costs related to the complexities of the situation.

The best analogy I’ve heard is from one of my friends. He described the situation as akin to dating two women at the same time. There’s nothing illegal about it, but you really really don’t want either side to find out.

Our timeline (as best as I can remember):

— 2008-02 Applied for Canadian PR (FSW program)
— 2008-03 Applied for US green card via marriage (consular processing)
— 2008-10 Green card interview in Montreal & immigrant visa received
— 2009-01 Entered USA briefly to get I-551 stamp
— 2009-05 Obtained Canadian PR
— 2010-01 Moved to USA
— 2010-07 Moved back to Canada
— 2010-10 Petitioned to remove conditions on residence (I-751)
— 2010-12 Biometrics appointment for I-751 (stayed in USA thereafter until 2011-02)
— 2011-03 Received 10-year green card
— 2012-01 Moved back to USA
— 2012-11 Applied for naturalization in USA (N-400)
— 2012-12 Biometrics appointment for N-400
— 2013-02 N-400 interview (decision deferred)
— 2013-04 Oath ceremony
— 2013-05 Moved back to Canada permanently

The $30k costs were mainly due to maintaining multiple residences, moving back and forth, plane tickets, and having to file US state income taxes in some years to maintain the green card. It becomes a major juggling act and a huge stress to bounce between the two countries just enough to convince government officials in both countries that you really do live in their country. We were careful not to stay out of the USA for more than six months at a time. Not one cent was spent on lawyers.

No immigration officer ever asked us about our status in the other country, and we never volunteered this information. Once, a CBP officer asked at the border, and I answered truthfully, and nothing came of it.

Right now, we live in Canada as Canadian permanent residents, with US citizenship. It will be another two years before we qualify for Canadian citizenship, and the current backlog for Canadian citizenship applications is another two years on top of that. However, since we intend to stay here a while, there’s no hurry to apply for Canadian citizenship.

Comment

  • Join Date: Apr 2014
  • Posts: 15

I am writing to seek your kind advice on what option should be safe to me for both immigration and tax purposes:

Очень важная для вас статья:  Business Inteligence

+ Option 1: I should file my US tax returns to comply with both tax and immigration laws, and accept the potential risk that my overseas employment can be visible to the immigration authorities and my permanent residence status can be challenged accordingly? Will taking up an overseas employment (alone) pose any risk to my permanent residence status?

I know this was posted last year, but in case anyone else reads this: Option 1 is the only option. As I explain my previous reply, I spent lots of time in Canada with green card issues. In two of those years, I filed from a foreign (Canadian) address. In all of those years, I had Canadian-sourced income listed in my return. It was never really a problem.

The most important thing, by far, is you must never claim the foreign earned income exclusion on your federal tax return. Even if you are eligible for this exclusion, you are not required to claim it, and you should never ever claim it. There are only two ways to be eligible for the exclusion: bona-fide residence in a foreign country, or 330 days of physical presence in a foreign country in a year. Either one is very very bad for your green card, and if it pops up on your tax return, it’s a huge red flag. The only exception is if you have a reentry permit, in which case it might be safe (but I never tried it). Do not confuse the foreign earned income exclusion with the foreign tax credit. The foreign tax credit is perfectly safe to claim, and in fact I claimed it every year.

The IRS does not provide any of your tax return information to USCIS, CBP, or DHS. None. I am fairly confident of this. In the course of my USCIS interviews, it was completely clear that they knew no information about my tax returns beyond what I provided to them.

Some USCIS forms do ask for your tax return information. For example, I-751 (Petition to remove conditions on residence) asks for copies of your prior year’s tax returns. Providing this information is optional; you’re free to submit other evidence of joint financial records instead. In my case, I elected to submit copies of my tax returns, which had a US address that year, but substantial Canadian employment income. It must have worked: the petition was approved without an interview. Note however that the primary purpose of I-751 is to prove that your marriage is a bona fide marriage, not to prove that you maintained the residency requirements for your green card. Since the I-751 adjudicators are looking for marriage fraud, not residence fraud, I think a foreign tax return would not raise much of a red flag for this purpose.

The other major form that requires tax return information is the N-400 (Application for naturalization). For this form, one of the options (in fact, the preferred option) is to send in three years worth of tax transcripts. For people with foreign income, tax transcripts actually work to your advantage, since they do not contain copies of your tax slips showing your foreign employer(s). Tax transcripts simply show the amount of income declared in each box. However, the tax transcripts do show your filing address, so if this address is abroad, be prepared to do some explaining. In our case one return was from a foreign address, but the interviewer never asked about that. As I stated above, we were very careful to avoid the foreign earned income exclusion — that would show up on a tax transcript.

One thing we did get into trouble for is that we once filed a state income tax return as a non-resident. The N-400 specifically asks whether you ever have filed a return as a non-resident, and we chose not to lie. We thought it wouldn’t be a problem since the return was filed prior to the 3-year period on which our N-400 was based. But the interviewer kept harping on this point. Eventually, we discovered the ***** words to make this problem go away: «The tax return in question lies outside of the 3-year statutory period on which this N-400 application is based.» Bingo, oath ceremony within two months.

TL;DR summary: If you’re not a conditional resident and you don’t intend to apply for naturalization then they’ll never check your tax returns. If you do apply for naturalization, get your ducks in order by never filing any return as a non-resident, never claiming the foreign earned income exclusion, and ideally having three years worth of returns from a US address before applying for naturalization.

Тема: Dual Canadian PR card and Green Card

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    Dual Canadian PR card and Green Card

    Здравствуйте! У меня такой вопрос (может кто-то на форуме имел схожую проблему). Я — гражданин США, жена — Permanent Resident в Канаде. Недавно ей открыли визу IR1 и теперь она должна активировать Green Card, въехав в США. В октябре этого года она подала на канадское гражданство, говорят сейчас это порядка 19 мес.

    Проблема в том, что случится с Canadian PR status, когда Green Card активруется? Я порылся в интернете, но мнения расходятся: одни говорят (ссылаясь на ответ с POE), что если условия (2 года из 5) выдерживаются — то Canadian BPOs это безразлично, другие — если Green Card активируется, то Canadian PR status утрачивается. Хотя на официальных сайтах Канады ничего не говорится о запрете иметь Canadian PR Card и Green Card (или другой страны), речь идет только о том как не потерять Canadian PR status.

    Как нам быть? Жена не хочет потерять возможность получить Canadian citizenship и, в то же время, хочет сохранить визу IR1.

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    Re: Dual Canadian PR card and Green Card

    он протухает. Она не может постоянно проживать в двух странах.

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    Re: Dual Canadian PR card and Green Card

    Kanadskie zakony ochen’ bystro i chsto meniaiutsia.

    Na nastoiascii moment eto tak, no eto mojet izmenit’sia v liuboi moment, kak chasto menialos’ v proshlom.
    Krome togo, dli apoluchenia kanadskogo gradanstva mogut byt’ inye trebovania k residency nejeli chem dlia sohranenia kanadskogo statusa PR.

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    Re: Dual Canadian PR card and Green Card

    Kanadskie zakony ochen’ bystro i chsto meniaiutsia.

    Na nastoiascii moment eto tak, no eto mojet izmenit’sia v liuboi moment, kak chasto menialos’ v proshlom.
    Krome togo, dli apoluchenia kanadskogo gradanstva mogut byt’ inye trebovania k residency nejeli chem dlia sohranenia kanadskogo statusa PR.

    Раевский, спасибо! Условие резиденции для получения Канадского гражданства лишь одно — непрерывно проживать 3 года из 4-х на момент подачи заявки.

    Де-юре моя жена выполнила это требование, теперь вся заковыка — нигде официально не написано о невозможности иметь два residence (или три) с точки зрения канадских officials. Тем более, в период с момента подачи заявки на гражданство до момента получения канадского гражданства. И никаких опять специальных условий для сохранения residence в этот период (опять-таки 2 года с 5).

    Еще такой вопрос. Будет ли факт активации GC в USA отображен в канадской иммиграционной електронной базе? Иными словами, до какой степени американцы и канадцы обмениваются информацией о пересечении границы и статусе, в котором пребывает особа? Или информация о статусе не передается? Принимая во внимание тот факт, как стороны любят друг друга (сам ощутил это на себе), думаю обмен идет только на уровне «имя-фамилия», не более.

    Having US green Card & Canadian PR card??

    Registered Users (C)

    Hi , I got my US green card in 2004. But I could not bring my spouse into US bcoz I got married after i have got US GC.

    Hence I processed my Canadian PR. I got it in year Dec 2006. My wife came to canada , i moved to Canada. I live in windsor, ON,Canada. But I work for
    US employer. I visit US once in a month from windsor & work from home in windsor for US employer.

    When i visit Detroit,Michigan few days ago, No problem in Entering US.

    When I come back to windsor,Canada, I showed my US green card (Not Canadian PR) to Canadian Immigration. Not showing my Canadian PR card,Bcoz ppl tells to import my car into Canada, i don’t want to do it . US immigration checks what do i do in canada. Everytime I re enter Windsor, I show my US green card.I did not have problem for last 4 or 5times.

    This time when i enter winsor(showed my US GC), they asked me to go to immigration official. they asked how long you are going to stay in Canada.
    & asked who lives in canada.

    I said i will be staying here for 3 months& told them my wife lives in Windsor.
    They checked my passport, told that you are canadian PR. & u are also having US GC. they said you can’t have both Canadian PR & US GC..

    I did not show my Canadian PR card at that time. They stamped my passprt with 3month Validity on it. they did not say anything.

    Can i file for extension to stay in Canada more than 3months & Can i talk canadian Immigration people regarding this. OR After consulting Attorney,Can i talk to canadian immigration. i dont want to give up my Canadian PR Now.

    Anyway My wife recently got H1B Petition, She can move to US only in October,2007. Stamping in my passport is valid until sep 13th(3months from now).

    What Can i do ? plz help me in this matter..

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    U.S. and Canadian Immigration Policies: A Comparison

    August 19, 2015 by CIC News

    The immigration landscape of North America is constantly changing. Canada and the United States, to a large extent, followed parallel trajectories in the earlier parts of their immigration histories. Both countries initially drew principally on migrants from the British Isles and Europe, before expanding their catchment area to other regions of the world. Over time, however, Canadian and U.S. immigration policies have diverged in significant ways.

    Immigration issues are in the news in both countries these days, perhaps more so than usual. Canada is in election mode, with many new Canadians expected to vote for the first time. Meanwhile in the United States, a combative Republican Presidential nominee contest, led by the enigmatic Donald Trump, has placed immigration policy to the fore. But what are we really talking about when we talk about immigration? How does Canada differ from the U.S.? This article will present five fundamental ways in which Canadian immigration policy is different from that of the U.S.

    1. Canada favours economic immigration.

    Around two-thirds of new Canadian permanent residents arrive through economic immigration programs. In contrast, only 16 percent of new Green Card holders (lawful permanent residents, or LPRs) in the U.S. arrive through economic immigration categories. Politicians and commentators in other countries continually point to Canada’s points-based economic immigration as a shining example of a positive, open immigration strategy that creates opportunities for newcomers and Canadians alike.

    Sources: Department of Homeland Security, Citizenship and Immigration Canada. U.S. figures are for 2013. Canadian figures are projected for 2015.

    2. There is no Diversity Lottery in Canada, but Canada has the Express Entry pool

    The Diversity Immigrant Visa program, also known as the Green Card lottery, is a lottery program for receiving a U.S. Permanent Resident Card. Canada has no such program. In 2014, the Green Card lottery attracted more than 11 million applicants. From this pool of applicants less than 0.5 percent were to receive visas, which are allocated at random in a single annual draw. With odds of less than one in two hundred, applicants generally enter the pool of applicants in the Green Card lottery more in hope than expectation.

    Canada has its own sort of pool — the Express Entry pool, which came into operation earlier in January, 2015 — where candidates who have made an Expression of Interest in immigrating to Canada are ranked according to a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS). Candidates are selected from the pool on a priority basis, rather than at random, at regular draws from the pool. Selected candidates receive an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence in Canada, from which point they have 60 days to submit an application, with processing times of six months or less. Within the first few months of Express Entry’s launch a consistently increasing number of candidates in the Express Entry pool have received ITAs, with many of these individuals having quickly gone on to land in Canada as permanent residents. Furthermore, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) recently stated that ‘Future rounds from the Express Entry pool will become the main source of applications to meet annual Canadian immigration levels targets.’

    While not everyone is eligible to enter the Express Entry pool, the same is true for the Green Card lottery. The major difference, however, is that individuals presently ineligible to enter the Express Entry pool can become eligible through their own endeavour by improving their language ability, adding supplementary work experience, and/or completing a higher level of education. Applicants to the Green Card lottery, on the other hand, are at the whim of a program that only allows candidates from certain countries to enter, and that’s before the randomness of the draw itself is taken into account.

    3. The Provincial Nominee Programs

    In Canada, the federal government and the provinces and territories share jurisdiction over the selection of immigrants. Provinces and territories can create and tailor Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) that allow them to nominate individuals who are deemed likely to contribute positively to the community, both socially and economically. The federal government then attends to health and security matters before issuing the permanent resident visa. The PNPs are a dynamic set of programs that fast-track the entrance of newcomers who arrive in their new homes knowing that the region in which they are settling wants them there. Indeed, these newcomers are actively pursued by the provincial governments.

    The 50 U.S. state governments do not benefit from such a de-centralized system, however, with immigration jurisdiction remaining exclusively with the U.S. federal government.

    4. International students in Canada can stay after graduation

    When Mitt Romney was running for President of the U.S. in 2012, he stated “If you get an advanced degree here, we want you to stay here – so we will staple a Green Card to your diploma.” Alas, post-graduation work and immigration options for international students in the U.S. remain scant to this day, with many graduates effectively forced to leave the country soon after graduation. These individuals take with them their ideas, creativity and know-how and use it elsewhere — very often in Canada. In turn, the U.S. loses out on a potentially high-earning tax base.

    In contrast, Canada offers its cohort of international students something that is not available, or more difficult to obtain, in other countries — a post-graduation work permit for up to three years. International students who go down this route also benefit from permanent immigration options, including the Canadian Experience Class and the Quebec Experience Class. All of this allows Canada to retain top talent.

    5. A Green Card and Canadian permanent residence are fundamentally different

    A Green Card is the popular name for a United States Permanent Resident Card. Instead of a Canada Green Card, permanent residents of Canada have the right to a Canada Permanent Resident Card as proof of their Canada immigration status. The distinction is not a question of semantics; there is a significant difference in the philosophies behind the issuance of a United States Green Card and a Canada Permanent Resident Card.

    A Green Card grants the holder the permission to enter and live in the United States. In contrast, Canadian permanent resident status grants an individual the right to enter and live in Canada. Having permission and having the right are two distinct claims. A right is something more — it is a legal entitlement, inherent to the holder. Permanent residents of the United States must be in possession of their U.S Green Cards at all times and must be prepared to show them to U.S. authorities upon request. Canada permanent residents have no such obligation. Not only do they not have to carry around their Canada Permanent Resident Card, they are not even required to apply for the card. Though useful to have, a Canada Permanent Resident Card is purely voluntary.

    Why Canada?

    “Over the past few years, many American lawmakers have tended to view immigration through the lens of security issues or national sovereignty, rather than as an opportunity to add dynamism and flexibility to the labour market,” says Attorney David Cohen. “The popular image of energetic immigrants arriving on American shores and ‘making it’ through hard work and bright ideas is redundant if the system there won’t allow for it.

    “On the other hand, Canada accepts more immigrants per capita than any other country in the Americas. And these people succeed and prosper. They provide for their families, open businesses and create opportunities for others. According to a BMO study, nearly half of all millionaires in Canada are immigrants or second-generation residents, compared to just one-third in America. While in the United States people have been busy pursuing happiness, most of their counterparts in Canada have been busy living it. With a wide range of immigration options, it is the true land of opportunity in North America.”

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