Walk In, BC Канада


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Vancouver, BC, Canada

Vancouver Marijuana Laws

It is against the law to possess marijuana in Canada. Cannabis is schedule II in Canada (for more than 3 kg). Canada’s cannabis control laws are spottily enforced, with the west coast (British Columbia) being well known for its high quality cannabis and low levels of enforcement. In 2002, Canada’s federal government made several findings in favor of cannabis legalization and medical use approval. Although the status of medical cannabis is still in flux (sep 2002), the Canadian government has several times voiced its intention to support full medical use. Non-viable Cannabis seeds and Cannabis stalks (that do not include leaves, flowers, seeds or branches) are exempted.

Law Enforcement

Cops are very lenient. If they find anything under an ounce on you most of the time they will just take it away. If they want to be a prick about it they can give you a ticket, it’s like a speeding ticket you just have to pay it. If you have a scale or baggies then you can be charged with trafficking, but again, if you have less then an ounce they will most likely just take your scale and baggies and weed.

Marijuana illegality is hardly enforced. If you were hiking around with a couple kilo’s in a see through backpack there might be some problem, but personal possession definitely isn’t high on law enforcement’s mind. The locals seem pretty insistent that whatever you buy isn’t meant to be for ‘export’ (to the USA).

There’s a cop shop not far from where most of the commercial pot buying and selling goes on in the middle of the city, but they seem more interested in traffic problems than people walking by trailing a cloud of BC Bud smoke.

If you smoke out in the public alot, for sure there will be a chance of getting busted, but don’t worry, just be cooperative, except for don’t rat out your dealer. The police will not do anything, maybe take away your weed for themselves to smoke. Everybody does it, but the cops are starting to get a little annoyed by everyone thinking they can do it where ever and whenever they want.

According to WBH’s local smoker: “Yes, people smoke in parks. That is a very popular spot. But they usually choose a quieter spot in the park where there are not too many people – unless it is a Cannabis celebratory holiday or something. Nobody wants to impose on those who do not smoke. Unless they are ignorant little punks. In movie houses? Well… that’s pushing it a little I’d say. If you do have the guts to smoke in a movie theater, just know that you most likely will either be asked to leave, or very rudely asked to leave. I would most definitely agree that it is just about on par with tobacco smoking in BC, and I would also agree that Vancouver (as well as Surrey, Chilliwack, and Coquitlam all in BC) is a very smoker-friendly place to be. ”

Where to buy Marijuana in Vancouver

If you want to purchase weed online, use buyweedonline.ca. They are legit and trustworthy and your product will be delivered in 2-3 days. Also worth noting is that vancouver.craigslist.ca is always an option to find someone. We highly recommend that you read the rest of this article and into our comments aswell.

Other Tips
Our ever vigilant local reporters have helped us once again get the best info in town: “ok, where to get reliable bud at reasonable prices in Vancouver. Go to the New Amsterdam cafe on hastings st. face the cafe entrance. look left. you’ll notice stairs leading up. go up the stairs. upstairs, mill about for a moment on the carpeted area. a rough and tumble biker-type dude may ask you what you want. just tell him you’re looking for something to smoke. they have you stand on a white line on the carpet, waiting your turn. when it’s your turn, approach the desk with the rough and tumble biker dude and tell him what you want—(ie 20, 40, 60, 80, 100) —they will hook you up better than anyone on the street. in fact, many street hustlers get their bud here, then repackage and resell it to you at vastly inflated prices. this may sound somewhat more confusing than it actually is. en pocas palabras, walk up the stairs to the left of the New Amsterdam cafe b4 7 pm on any given night, and the rest will be self explanatory. it’s as easy as that. ”

“If you go into the New Amsterdam Cafe located on WEST Hastings, next to the BC Marijuana Party Bookstore, you may be able to find a fellow cannabis enthusiast amongst the many people at the tables who can hook you up. But do NOT ask the employees of the cafe if they will sell you marijuana. They are very clear that they do NOT do that.

You can find weed almost anywhere in Vancouver … just casually ask around. “BC Bud?” “Hydro?” “Chronic?” Someone will respond. Surrey is great for some really amazing marijuana as well.

Also, Blunt Brothers burnt down a couple years back now, and has been replaced by The New Amsterdam Cafe. ”

and: ” i was in Vancouver in oct. 2007 and the Blunt Bros. burn down 3 yrs. ago. you still have to buy from street dealers. then you can go into some head shop and smoke your pot. Hastings Street West is still the best place to buy. the dealers will find you if you hang out around the head shops.”

“The best place for buying pot is on Hastings Street… and it’s not hard

to find. Turn right off the main drag onto Hastings, go about three blocks — and on the left hand of the street are a number of coffee shops, head shops, and taverns. Ask anyone working there where it is and they’ll tell you. ”

“Marijuana is available anywhere in Vancouver, you will have no trouble finding street dealers, but they don’t always sell you weed, and they never have the good stuff that made BC famous. There are a few secret stores in downtown Vancouver that sells premium quality pot with a large selection of variety, you enter by a password. There are also many full-time dealers working out of their homes….it’s extremely easy to meet very friendly stoners anywhere in Vancouver, or the whole province, once u gain their trust they will definitly hook you up with a consistent dealer. If you’re visiting, make some friends by the BCMP and nearby cafes. Good dealers deal out of their homes or in ‘secret’ stores that sells only pot.”

Cannabis Prices and Types

$25-$30 for an 1/8th.

$50-$65 for a quarter.

$80-$150 for a half ounce. Depends on quality/strain.

$220-$300 for one ounce.

“They are endless but most of the time it will be lemon hashplant, kush, OG kush, Master kush, Orange kush, purple kush, purple indica or just plain old BC big buds. ”

“Best thing about BC bud is its variety. A good dealer will have at least 3 different types of weed to choose from, and they will be glad to let you thoroughly check out the quality.”

More Information

In BC, people from all walks of life smoke pot. Lawyers, politicians, housewives, accountants, teachers, police. BC is definitely one of the top stoner paradises. Visit the Island in the fall, when people harvest their outdoor crop, those are the best of the best BC buds. Also, winter will have a lot more pot available than summer, thus there may be slight price difference between winter and summer. There is more pot during winter because because more electricity is used in the winter because of heater, and grow houses are less likely to get busted for the high amount of electricity usage.

Never smoke in the park across from the headshops on Hastings. Plain clothes cops all over that take your stash to smoke themselves.

Here is a great line up of recommended locales for having a good time after getting your smoke in Vancouver: now, once you have your bud (it will be exactly what you are after—-super potent, stinky, crystally bc bud) you can walk downstairs, order yourself a coffee in the new amsterdam cafe, and smoke a fat joint. if you like to mix tobacco in your joint, you will have to go into their special separate, glass-enclosed room for this purpose. the folks in there are generally chummy and amiable. once you are sufficiently stoned, allow me to recommend a few activities around town. if you like a good happy ending massage, hop in a cab and head over to miss cleo’s. prices are reasonable, and it can be a good way to further de-stress. you are on vacation, after all, so have fun. another fun activity while baked is to hop on one of the double decker tour buses frequently touring the sights in Vancouver. an all-day ticket is available at any hotel or hostel. a good place to stay and meet similar, like-minded young tourists, or even make a romantic connection (if you are smooth enough) is the hosteling international hostel. they have a kitchen, laundry facility, and a lounge with a computer, phone, etc. another fun activity while stoned is to take a meandering stroll through Vancouver’s Chinatown (better done during the daylight hours) and enjoy some tasty and authentic Chinese cuisine for your munchies (very reasonably priced). another fun thing to do, is to head over to Stanley park, recognized around the globe as one of the great parks of the world. you can take a stroll, be in nature, and be close enough to walk back to your hostel or hotel if you are feeling motivated enough. if you find that smoking such potent bud gives you a high level of paranoia—i suggest waking up early and going for a jog in stanley park prior to your smoke session—the endorphins released during sustained rhythmic exercise are great for counteracting pot-induced cerebral malaise. also, it will prime your lungs for the sweet smoke. another thing to keep in mind, is—no one has ever died from a pot overdose—there is no such thing. also, sometimes pot anxiety can be linked to a subconscious feeling of guilt when you smoke—you may be feeling you are doing something wrong and unhealthy when you smoke—nothing could be further from the truth— the following is excerpted, with link provided here:

If one gets the idea of crossing the whole Canada by hitch-hiking (if you’re a girl, get a man with you, though), one will meet all kind of people, from farmers in the prairies, with their pick-up, to business men, all of them with their bag of pot hidden under the passenger seat, giving it to you and telling you with a big smile “Would you roll a joint? And here’s for you on your way…” Ha, if you especially come from Europe, be aware of the Canadian way of rolling joints. They use a single little rolling paper, and roll the weed without tobacco or anything else in it.

The weed usually smoked is hydroponic, although the sun is high enough to make some really good weed growing, particularly on the west side (no snow over there).

Vancouver is a bit different from Montreal, considering it’s in the English-speaking part. I’m talking here about the downtown Vancouver. Weed is sold all along Granville St., and the whole downtown in general. The Chinese town, next to the touristic area, is full of dealers, too. Watch your back there, though. All of them aren’t honest people, that’s all I can say in here. On Hastings, there are a few cafés in which you’re allowed to smoke weed (Blunt Brothers, and another one). A dealer is usually posted in front of them. He looks scetchy, but he’s a real one. Again, watch out, some of them are faking, and might as well run away with the money, while the real one’s reloading. Other places are beaches and parks during the summer. With a bit of luck on your side, you should find what you want.

Out of these cities, I’d say that weed is everywhere anyway. Talk to a few buddies on the street, you’ll get your way. Canadian people are very kind, you’ll have a hard time getting in trouble with them. On the west side, Kelowna is packed with weed, Penticton too (go on the beach, there). On the east side, same thing (except for the beaches part, haha), weed is everywhere for who knows where to look. Toronto’s particularly easy. The country side should require a bit more attention. You’ll have to talk to farmers and native people (be careful, they often smoke shake, which is gross).

Well, for me it’s all for now, so I wish you to enjoy your trip in Canada, and always stay safe!

Thanks to the many contributors for making this page what it is!

Иммиграция в Канаду по British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP)

14 сентября 2020, 09:26

Британская Колумбия , самая западная провинция Канады, ー это колыбель культурного разнообразия и экономического роста.

Британская Колумбия олицетворяет многогранность канадской культуры. Здесь находится Ванкувер ー третий по величине город в стране. Провинция богата природными ресурсами; центральное место в экономике занимает лесное хозяйство и горнодобывающая промышленность. Красотой здешней природы восхищаются не только в Канаде, но и во всём мире. Подробнее о провинции читайте тут.

В Британской Колумбии действует провинциальная программа номинации British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP). Это программа иммиграции, в рамках которой иностранцы с необходимыми провинции знаниями и навыками, могут получить сначала сертификат о номинации от провинциального правительства, а затем вид на жительство. Причём этот процесс происходит быстрее, чем в рамках иммиграционных программ любого другого класса.

BC PNP делится на два основных иммиграционных потока:

Потоки, в свою очередь, делятся на категории. Ниже приведены описания каждой из них, чтобы помочь вам сделать оптимальный выбор.

Обновление: в августе 2020 года в рамках BC PNP провинция открыла проект Tech Pilot для привлечения талантливых работников по 32 техническим специальностям. Список специальностей и полную информацию о проекте чит айте здесь .

Skills Immigration

Поток BC PNP Skills Immigration делится на такие категории:

Skilled Worker Category ー категория для специалистов, которые получили предложение о работе на высококвалифицированной должности в соответствии с требованиями программы. Обязательное условие для кандидатов ー наличие опыта работы на высококвалифицированной должности.

Health Care Professional Category ー категория для медицинских работников (врачей, медсестёр, психиатрического медперсонала) с опытом работы и действительным предложением о работе по одной из 11 утверждённых специальностей.

International Graduate Category ー Категория для кандидатов, которые выпустились из утверждённых канадских вузов не более трёх лет назад. Для участие в этой категории требуется получить предложение о работе от работодателя из Британской Колумбии.

International Post-Graduate Category ー Категория для выпускников магистерских и докторских программ утверждённых канадских вузов в области медицины, естественных и прикладных наук. Предложение о работе не требуется.

Entry Level and Semi-Skilled Worker Category ー Категория для работников низшей/средней квалификации в области туризма, пищевой промышленности, грузоперевозок или для работников низшей/средней квалификации, проживающих и работающих в Северо-восточном районе развития Британской Колумбии.

Больше информации о потоке BC PNP Skills Immigration stream здесь .


Express Entry British Columbia

Express Entry BC работает в рамках федеральной системы Express Entry . Отвечающие требованиям кандидаты имеют право на ускоренное рассмотрение заявки на участие в BC PNP, а после получения номинации ー заявления на получение вида на жительство.

По системе Express Entry работают следующие категории:

Skilled Worker Category

Health Care Professional Category

International Graduate Category

International Post-Graduate Category

Больше информации о системе Express Entry British Columbia здесь .

Skills Immigration Registration System (SIRS)

27 января 2020 года правительство Британской Колумбии перевело PNP на новую систему регистрации кандидатов ー Skills Immigration Registration System (SIRS). После регистрации программа начисляет заявителям баллы, которые определяют, получит ли он от провинции приглашение к подаче полного заявления (Invitation to Apply). Количество баллов зависит от уровня образования, наличия непосредственного опыта работы в Британской Колумбии и предложения о работы от провинции, которое подтверждает, что кандидат представляет ценность для местного рынка труда и способен принести ценность провинциальной экономии.

Больше о SI RS читайте здесь .

Entrepreneur Immigration

Иностранцы, намеренные жить и вести бизнес в Британской Колумбии, могут получит вид на жительство через поток Entrepreneur Immigration. Он делится на две категории:

Entrepreneur Category ー Категория для старших менеджеров или владельцев бизнеса, желающих вложить средства в предложенный им бизнес в Британской Колумбии.

Strategic Projects Category ー Категория для компаний, которые находятся под иностранным контролем и желают открыть филиал в Британской Колумбии. Пять ключевых сотрудников из ряда менеджеров, специалистов и технического персонала получают от провинции номинацию.

Больше информации о BC PNP Entrepreneur Category здесь .

Больше о BC PNP Strategic Projects Category по этой ссылке .

UBC Vancouver Campus

Quicklinks

The University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus is located at the western tip of the Point Grey Peninsula in the city of Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada.

More than 400 hectares in size, the stunning campus is surrounded by forest on three sides and ocean on the fourth, and is just a 30 minute bus ride to Vancouver’s downtown core. The campus has been located on this site for most of its 100-year history; a location that is the traditional territory of the Musqueam people.

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The campus also has two additional sites, one in the heart of downtown Vancouver at Robson Square, and another at Centre for Digital Media.

Facilities

As a top-ranked research university, the Vancouver campus is home to some outstanding facilities, including:

  • UBC Welcome Centre — the perfect place to start your journey on the Vancouver campus
  • TRIUMF — one of the world’s leading laboratories for subatomic physics
  • UBC Library — one of Canada’s leading academic libraries, with 21 branches and divisions on this campus
  • The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts — one of the world’s great concert halls
  • The Centre for Interactive Research in Sustainability (CIRS)
  • The Arthur Erickson designed Museum of Anthropology — Canada’s largest teaching museum
  • The Beaty Biodiversity Museum — home to Canada’s largest blue whale skeleton
  • The world class UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research
  • The UBC Farm — the only working farm in the city of Vancouver
  • Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre — home to Thunderbird Ice Hockey and 2010 Winter Olympics Ice Hockey Venue
  • Nitobe Memorial Garden — considered one of the top five Japanese Gardens outside of Japan

Vancouver Campus Virtual Tour

View the campus from anywhere in the world. Current students will walk you through key locations, giving you a feel for what it’s like to live and learn at UBC. See residences, study spots, recreational facilities, lecture halls, academic buildings, and more.

Okanagan Campus

The Okanagan campus is an intimate learning community embracing bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty. More than 8,300 students from throughout the Okanagan region, across Canada and 80 other countries are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs in eight faculties and schools.

25 Best Things to Do in Vancouver (BC, Canada)

There are few places on Earth where you can ski, surf, be transported back in time over 5,000 years, watch a pod of Orcas frolic in the midst, or take a stroll through the world’s best urban park, all in one day; Vancouver is that place. Nestled between vast valleys, lush temperate rain forest, and an unforgiving mountain range, Vancouver, British Columbia is unmistakably West Coast. While Vancouver is one of Canada’s newer cities, it holds the title as the most ethnically diverse and the most dense, with more than half a million people crammed into its modest downtown core. And though it may sound crowded, after hosting a very successful 2010 Winter Olympics, Vancouver is consistently voted one of the most livable cities in the world.

Vancouver is an outdoor enthusiasts playground, with three world class mountains all within a 15 minute drive from downtown, hundreds of parks and campsites, thousands of hiking trails, one of the worlds longest seawalls and countless rivers and lakes to explore. There is an endless list of things to do in Vancouver, with an activity for every age group and suiting all interests, but there are only so many hours in a day, so here is a great list to get you started.

1. Visit the Museum of Anthropology

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Museum Of Anthropology

It’s easy to be dazzled by Vancouver’s geographical splendor, but to properly get acquainted with this city, you have to start at the beginning, the very beginning. Vancouver and what is known as the Lower Mainland was peopled some 10,000 years ago. Overlooking the Burrard Inlet, on campus at the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology offers up a mosaic of Aboriginal works, both ancient and contemporary, all weaving together a story that is rarely told to visitors of this great city. If you really want to learn about the city’s roots, and its relationship with the global community, this is one of the most important things to do in Vancouver.

2. Take a Drive up the Sea-to-Sky Highway

Source: Josef Hanus / shutterstock

Rated as one of the most the beautiful drives in the world, the Sea-to-Sky corridor takes visitors on a 1.5 hour long journey, from the heart of downtown Vancouver to the world class ski town of Whistler. With waterfalls, jaw-dropping vistas, a stunning cultural center and a suspension bridge along the way, you’ll want to pack a lunch, your camera and gas up the rental car, because this journey is one you won’t want to miss.

3. Hike the Grouse Grind

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There is no better way to become an honorary Vancouverite (yep, that’s what they’re called), than to earn your stripes on the Grouse Grind. Nicknamed “Mother Nature’s Staircase”, this is no Sunday stroll. Located on Vancouver’s North Shore, at the foot of its namesake (Grouse Mountain), the Grind as it’s affectionately known, takes hikers some 850m up through the alpine. Once you reach the top, a panoramic chalet awaits with ice cold drinks and sweeping views of the city. And once you’ve recovered, save those wobbly legs from further torture and enjoy a scenic ride down the mountain on the Grouse Gondola.

4. Cycle Around Stanley Park

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The votes are in and the crowd has spoken; Vancouver’s Stanley Park managed to elbow out the likes of New York’s Central Park, the Luxeumbourg Gardens in Paris and Chicago’s Millennium Park to be named the World’s Best Park by Trip Advisor. So why is it so great? Where else in the world can you cycle all the way around an old growth forest, visit ancient Aboriginal village sites, steal a tan at the beach, lounge around a rose garden or get up and close with sea lions and Pacific dolphins. There are a handful of bicycle rental spots at the base of Denman Street, and its the best way to get around the park.

5. Windowshop in Gastown

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Vancouver proper began in the heart of what is now a trendy neighborhood called Gastown, named after a historical figure known as “Gassy Jack”. Once Canada’s third largest city, “Gastown” in 1867, was the site of various lumber mills, Gastown is now home to chic loft apartments, European eateries, cocktail lounges and flashy boutiques. There are a few galleries of note along Water Street, and plenty of places to buy Canadiana.

6. Dim Sum in China Town

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China Town, Vancouver

The great thing about sightseeing in Vancouver is it’s easy to knock off multiple things in one visit to any of its unique neighborhoods. Vancouver’s Chinatown is one of the oldest in Canada and the largest. Perched on the edge of the Downtown Financial District and Gastown, Chinatown offers up an array of funky shops, inexpensive markets, and of course, the best Dim Sum restaurants in town. Sunday is the busiest day for Dim Sum, but also the best with multi-generational families sitting down and chatting about the week’s events.

7. Find Your Zen

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Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden In Vancouver

While you’re in the neighborhood, Chinatown is home to one of Canada’s most impressive Chinese gardens, Dr. Sun Yat Sen. What makes it so exquisite is its unique construction. Constructed with wholly traditional methods (by hand), the site mimics complex gardens found on the Mainland with courtyards, meandering brooks, impeccably sculpted vegetation, all in keeping with the Confucian and Buddhist tradition.

8. Kayaking in Deep Cove

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If getting up close and personal with mother nature is your idea of the perfect day out, ocean kayaking is one of the most popular things to do in Vancouver, and Deep Cove is one of the best and safest places to do it in Canada. A tranquil paddle up Indian Arm, a picturesque fjord where the forests creatures come down to the water’s edge to greet you with curiosity.

9. Take an Aquabus to Granville Island

Source: James Wheeler / shutterstock

No visit to Vancouver is complete without a visit to the artsy Granville Island. Interestingly, it’s more a little peninsula than an island. What was once an industrial manufacturing hub, is now the meeting place for well-to-do Vancouverites and tourists to shop for the organic produce, sip on premium teas, sample fine chocolates, listen to buskers, and watch sleek yachts sidle on up to the dock.

10. Visit the Richmond Night Market

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Richmond Night Market

If you’re here during the summer months, which is best time to visit, the Richmond Market is one of the most interesting markets to wander through. Home to Vancouver’s largest Chinese community, Richmond puts on quite the show, with endless stalls of trinkets, and interesting foods, and art demonstrations.

11. Take a Foodie Tour

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Vancouver Foodie Tour

Vancouver is the most ethnically diverse city in the world, which means, if you can dream up a style cuisine, it’s probably here. Its culinary influences are infinite, from the freshest sushi, to the most rustic farm-to-table, you could easily take a tour around the globe eating here, so why not let someone do that for you and hop on a foodie tour. Pair the complex food scene with an exploding craft beer and wine industry and you have yourself the makings of a perfectly delicious day!

12. Hike in Lynn Canyon

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Vancouver has two suspension bridges, both equally spectacular, but one is always crowded with tourists and costly, and the other is frequented more by locals and free! Located in the heart of Lynn Valley, Lynn Canyon Park has been delighting hiking enthusiasts for over 100 years! Complete with trails, popular swimming holes, breathtaking waterfalls of course, a hair-raising suspension bridge, 50 meters up in the canopy makes this a must do, no matter how short your visit.

13. Wander Van Dusen Botanical Gardens

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Van Dusen Botanical Gardens

Garden enthusiasts from around the world love wandering the tranquil 22 acres of Vancouver’s Van Dusen Botanical Gardens. The great thing about this paradise in the city is you can visit it all year round. In the warmer months, pack a picnic, take a stroll down Laburnum Walk, and find a find a shady spot to enjoy the fragrant garden. The garden takes you on a tour of the world’s eco system, all in one place.

14. Watch a Concert at the Commodore

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The Commodore, Vancouver

Vancouver offers up a plethora of live music venues, and there’s always someone famous in town, dazzling the crowds. One of the oldest and most beloved venues is the Commodore Ballroom. Originating in the 1920’s during the vibrant Art Deco era, the Commodore has hosted the likes of Sammy Davis Jr., U2, Tina Turner and Lady Gaga. Unlike the larger venues in town, admission prices are reasonable and the atmosphere casual.

15. Catch a Canucks Game

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Canada is hockey country, there is no question. Hockey is to Canada what football (soccer) is to Europe, and if you happen to be in Vancouver between October and April, seeing the Vancouver Canucks go head-to-head with any number of NHL teams is one of the most exciting things to do in Vancouver.

16. Go for a Run in Pacific Spirit Park

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Pacific Spirit Park

You’ll soon learn that Vancouverites love to spend all of their extra time in the outdoors, and one place they love to do that is in beautiful Pacific Spirit Regional Park. This park is complete With 874 hectares of pristine forest and plenty of manicured trails to run on. Visitors can enjoy a nice long 10km hike around the perimeter, or meander through it. And if you have the pooch along, this park is not only dog-friendly, but in many parts, off-leash friendly.

17. Sea-to-Sky Gondola

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We’ve already suggested you head up the sea-to-sky corridor, what we haven’t delved into are all the amazing things you’ll find along the way like the Sea-to-Sky Gondola, one of Vancouver’s newest and most exciting attractions. Vancouver is all about spectacular views, and the 100 meter long Sky Pilot Suspension Bridge provides 360 degree views of all the Squamish region has to offer. From rugged mountains above to the vibrant turquoise fjord below, you may not want to come down.

18. Catch a Sunset in English Bay

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Vancouver’s West End neighborhood is one of the most unique in Canada. It’s the most densely populated urban neighborhood in the country, and because of its adjacent location to Stanley Park and with the popularity of the seawall, it’s a highly transitional neighborhood. In the summer, it’s hard to know where the tourists end and the locals begin! When dinner time hits, wander down Denman Street and find a spot for good eats and cocktails. Then head on down to English Bay, find a bench, and watch as mother nature puts on her finest show in the sky above.

19. Visit Christ Church Cathedral

Source: 4kclips / shutterstock

Christ Church Cathedral

Vancouver has many churches, but few as beautiful as the Christ Church Cathedral. You don’t have to be religious to admire this Gothic Revival structure built with West Coast Douglas fir beams. From its exquisite stained glass windows, to stunning archways, this is a great place to find some peace and quiet.

20. Get Folksy on the Sunshine Coast

Source: EB Adventure Photography / shutterstock

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada


Vancouver is amazing, but if you are lucky enough to have some extra time on your hands, there is a plethora of day trips that are bucketlist worthy. A forty-minute ferry ride will take you to the Sunshine Coast, Canada’s best kept secret, and one that we’re telling you so you can experience a coastal oasis. The roads are as lackadaisical as the wonderfully quirky people who live in this coastal community. Visitors can base themselves in Sechelt, Roberts Creek or Gibsons, or if you’re feeling more adventurous, rent a cabin up the coast and spend your days shopping at authentic farmer’s markets, laze around peaceful lakes, and or grab a book and head down to the beach for some you time.

21. The PNE

Source: Nalidsa / shutterstock

PNE, Haunted House

Every summer, the Pacific National Exhibition returns to the city for a 17 day stint on its very own designated fair grounds. The century old tradition is local favorite and brings along with it an array of rides, farm animal auctions, a popular concert series, beer gardens, food vendors and all the makings of an exciting city-meets-urban fair.

22. Find a Local Event in the Georgia Strait

Source: androver / shutterstock

Vancouver Convention Center

If a Vancouverite wants to know “what’s on” in the city, they flip through the pages of the Georgia Strait. From hyper local community center talent shows, to blockbuster movies, ballets and headlining super-bands, any event at any time will be listed in here. Check out some jazz at a local club, check out a comedy show on Granville Island, or get dolled up for a charity event at the Vancouver Convention Center, whatever your flavour, you’ll find it listed in this free publication.

23. The Vancouver Aquarium

Source: Hannamariah / shutterstock

If you’ve ever wanted to get up close and personal with what lies beneath the frigid waters of the Pacific Ocean, or what’s living above in canopies of the Brazilian Amazon, the Vancouver Aquarium gives you that opportunity. One of North Americas largest aquariums, and conveniently located in the heart of Stanley Park, this attraction is one of the most popular things to do in Vancouver. There is lot’s to see, and as the Aquarium sees a regular rotation of unique exhibits, you may want to give yourself at least a day to come nose-to-nose with Belugas and learn about how essential the salmon is here in the Coastal ecosystem.

24. Lunch on the Drive

Source: Urban Napflin / shutterstock

Commercial Drive, Vancouver

Like any neighborhood around the world, Vancouver’s urban spaces tell a story. Commercial Drive is one of Vancouver’s oldest and most ethnically eclectic streets, and one that you definitely need to visit. This century old street, now affectionately termed “The Drive” is home to a mix of contemporary and Edwardian houses, Portguese bakeries, Brazilian coffee houses, Italian pasta places and any number of hippy-chic boutiques. In the spring and summer months, the Drive is a hive of activity, and a meeting place for those looking for good eats and great conversation.

26. Ski, Snowboard or Play in the Snow

Source: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock

Vancouver may be a temperate climate, but in the winter months, the North Shore mountains transform into a snow-capped wonderland. With three excellent mountains all within a 15 minutes drive from the downtown core, and a free shuttle to one of them, Vancouver is your perfect place for a winter holiday. Seymour and Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver offer up challenging runs and family fun, and Cypress in West Vancouver has the city’s best tubing park! And for the world class skiier, hob aboard a shuttle and head to Whistler/Blackcomb for one of the best alpine experiences in the world. It’s no wonder Vancouver played host to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games.

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25 Best Things to Do in Vancouver (BC, Canada):

  • Museum Of Anthropology: Xuanlu Wang / shutterstock
  • Sea-to-Sky Highway: Josef Hanus / shutterstock
  • Grouse Grind: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock
  • Stanley Park: romakoma / shutterstock
  • Gastown: i viewfinder / shutterstock
  • China Town, Vancouver: Claudine Van Massenhove / shutterstock
  • Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden In Vancouver: V J Matthew / shutterstock
  • Deep Cove: Swamis / shutterstock
  • Granville Island: James Wheeler / shutterstock
  • Richmond Night Market: Ronnie Chua / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Foodie Tour: sergioboccardo / shutterstock
  • Lynn Canyon: Marina Poushkina / shutterstock
  • Van Dusen Botanical Gardens: Bill Perry / shutterstock
  • The Commodore, Vancouver: Sergei Bachlakov / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Canucks: dean bertoncelj / shutterstock
  • Pacific Spirit Park: Alejandro Osorio A / shutterstock
  • Sea-to-Sky Gondola: Pierre Leclerc / shutterstock
  • English Bay: Pinkcandy / shutterstock
  • Christ Church Cathedral: 4kclips / shutterstock
  • Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada: EB Adventure Photography / shutterstock
  • PNE, Haunted House: Nalidsa / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Convention Center: androver / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Aquarium: Hannamariah / shutterstock
  • Commercial Drive, Vancouver: Urban Napflin / shutterstock
  • Grouse Mountain: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock
  • Vancouver: mffoto / shutterstock

Nordic Walking in Vancouver, BC, Canada

Travel Tips

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Nordic walking, also called urban poling or pole walking, started in Finland in the 20th century as an off-season ski-training exercise. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the sport began to take off around the world as a general form of exercise. It has been particularly popular in Canada. It involves using two specially designed walking poles that engage more muscles than walking alone. Vancouver is home to the company known as Urban Poling, a manufacturer of Nordic walking poles, and it also offers many classes, clubs and events in the discipline.

Advantages

Nordic walking is designed to offer a fuller, more well-rounded workout than walking alone. Similar to trekking poles, Nordic walking poles advertise benefits like greater stability and less impact on the knees. The activity is also designed to be a productive workout by increasing your heart rate and getting more muscle groups involved. According to Urban Poling, the poles engage as much as 90 percent of the body’s muscles. It has been found to be up to 46 percent more efficient than regular walking, according to the American Nordic Walking Association.

Equipment

The American Nordic Walking Association recommends using only poles built for Nordic walking, and advises against alternatives like hiking or ski poles. Nordic walking poles are similar to trekking poles, but are designed for the specifics of urban use. They feature rubber bumpers designed to navigate city streets and sidewalks, as well as carbide tips for snow and off-road use. There are a variety of styles, including fixed length and telescoping models. According to a Vancouver Sun article, seniors and those with balance problems should avoid adjustable poles and opt for fixed length models. The grip should decrease stress on the wrist joint. Nordic walking poles from Urban Poling come with instructional videos and start at around $100 at the time of publication.

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Classes

Perhaps the best way to get involved in Nordic walking and be sure that you’re doing it properly is to take an instructional class. Classes are offered throughout Canada, including many in Vancouver. A company called Natural Trekking (naturaltrekking.com) offers reservable clinics and group sessions throughout the week in various locations around Vancouver, North Vancouver and West Vancouver. Other locations that offer Nordic walking classes and clinics include the Langara Family YMCA (vanymca.org/centres/langara) and Dianne Miller Pilates Center (diannemillerpilates.com)

Free Clinics and Clubs

The aforementioned classes require a fee, but you can also get involved with Nordic walking by attending a Vancouver-area free clinic or joining a local Nordic walking club. Keenfit.com maintains a list of free clinics and clubs by city. Balance Walking is a Vancouver-based meet-up group that holds monthly get-togethers.

Disclosure

Leaf Group is a USA TODAY content partner providing general travel information. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

25 Best Things to Do in Vancouver (BC, Canada)

There are few places on Earth where you can ski, surf, be transported back in time over 5,000 years, watch a pod of Orcas frolic in the midst, or take a stroll through the world’s best urban park, all in one day; Vancouver is that place. Nestled between vast valleys, lush temperate rain forest, and an unforgiving mountain range, Vancouver, British Columbia is unmistakably West Coast. While Vancouver is one of Canada’s newer cities, it holds the title as the most ethnically diverse and the most dense, with more than half a million people crammed into its modest downtown core. And though it may sound crowded, after hosting a very successful 2010 Winter Olympics, Vancouver is consistently voted one of the most livable cities in the world.

Vancouver is an outdoor enthusiasts playground, with three world class mountains all within a 15 minute drive from downtown, hundreds of parks and campsites, thousands of hiking trails, one of the worlds longest seawalls and countless rivers and lakes to explore. There is an endless list of things to do in Vancouver, with an activity for every age group and suiting all interests, but there are only so many hours in a day, so here is a great list to get you started.

1. Visit the Museum of Anthropology

Source: Xuanlu Wang / shutterstock

Museum Of Anthropology

It’s easy to be dazzled by Vancouver’s geographical splendor, but to properly get acquainted with this city, you have to start at the beginning, the very beginning. Vancouver and what is known as the Lower Mainland was peopled some 10,000 years ago. Overlooking the Burrard Inlet, on campus at the University of British Columbia, the Museum of Anthropology offers up a mosaic of Aboriginal works, both ancient and contemporary, all weaving together a story that is rarely told to visitors of this great city. If you really want to learn about the city’s roots, and its relationship with the global community, this is one of the most important things to do in Vancouver.

2. Take a Drive up the Sea-to-Sky Highway

Source: Josef Hanus / shutterstock

Rated as one of the most the beautiful drives in the world, the Sea-to-Sky corridor takes visitors on a 1.5 hour long journey, from the heart of downtown Vancouver to the world class ski town of Whistler. With waterfalls, jaw-dropping vistas, a stunning cultural center and a suspension bridge along the way, you’ll want to pack a lunch, your camera and gas up the rental car, because this journey is one you won’t want to miss.

3. Hike the Grouse Grind

Source: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock


There is no better way to become an honorary Vancouverite (yep, that’s what they’re called), than to earn your stripes on the Grouse Grind. Nicknamed “Mother Nature’s Staircase”, this is no Sunday stroll. Located on Vancouver’s North Shore, at the foot of its namesake (Grouse Mountain), the Grind as it’s affectionately known, takes hikers some 850m up through the alpine. Once you reach the top, a panoramic chalet awaits with ice cold drinks and sweeping views of the city. And once you’ve recovered, save those wobbly legs from further torture and enjoy a scenic ride down the mountain on the Grouse Gondola.

4. Cycle Around Stanley Park

Source: romakoma / shutterstock

The votes are in and the crowd has spoken; Vancouver’s Stanley Park managed to elbow out the likes of New York’s Central Park, the Luxeumbourg Gardens in Paris and Chicago’s Millennium Park to be named the World’s Best Park by Trip Advisor. So why is it so great? Where else in the world can you cycle all the way around an old growth forest, visit ancient Aboriginal village sites, steal a tan at the beach, lounge around a rose garden or get up and close with sea lions and Pacific dolphins. There are a handful of bicycle rental spots at the base of Denman Street, and its the best way to get around the park.

5. Windowshop in Gastown

Source: i viewfinder / shutterstock

Vancouver proper began in the heart of what is now a trendy neighborhood called Gastown, named after a historical figure known as “Gassy Jack”. Once Canada’s third largest city, “Gastown” in 1867, was the site of various lumber mills, Gastown is now home to chic loft apartments, European eateries, cocktail lounges and flashy boutiques. There are a few galleries of note along Water Street, and plenty of places to buy Canadiana.

6. Dim Sum in China Town

Source: Claudine Van Massenhove / shutterstock

China Town, Vancouver

The great thing about sightseeing in Vancouver is it’s easy to knock off multiple things in one visit to any of its unique neighborhoods. Vancouver’s Chinatown is one of the oldest in Canada and the largest. Perched on the edge of the Downtown Financial District and Gastown, Chinatown offers up an array of funky shops, inexpensive markets, and of course, the best Dim Sum restaurants in town. Sunday is the busiest day for Dim Sum, but also the best with multi-generational families sitting down and chatting about the week’s events.

7. Find Your Zen

Source: V J Matthew / shutterstock

Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden In Vancouver

While you’re in the neighborhood, Chinatown is home to one of Canada’s most impressive Chinese gardens, Dr. Sun Yat Sen. What makes it so exquisite is its unique construction. Constructed with wholly traditional methods (by hand), the site mimics complex gardens found on the Mainland with courtyards, meandering brooks, impeccably sculpted vegetation, all in keeping with the Confucian and Buddhist tradition.

8. Kayaking in Deep Cove

Source: Swamis / shutterstock

If getting up close and personal with mother nature is your idea of the perfect day out, ocean kayaking is one of the most popular things to do in Vancouver, and Deep Cove is one of the best and safest places to do it in Canada. A tranquil paddle up Indian Arm, a picturesque fjord where the forests creatures come down to the water’s edge to greet you with curiosity.

9. Take an Aquabus to Granville Island

Source: James Wheeler / shutterstock

No visit to Vancouver is complete without a visit to the artsy Granville Island. Interestingly, it’s more a little peninsula than an island. What was once an industrial manufacturing hub, is now the meeting place for well-to-do Vancouverites and tourists to shop for the organic produce, sip on premium teas, sample fine chocolates, listen to buskers, and watch sleek yachts sidle on up to the dock.

10. Visit the Richmond Night Market

Source: Ronnie Chua / shutterstock

Richmond Night Market

If you’re here during the summer months, which is best time to visit, the Richmond Market is one of the most interesting markets to wander through. Home to Vancouver’s largest Chinese community, Richmond puts on quite the show, with endless stalls of trinkets, and interesting foods, and art demonstrations.

11. Take a Foodie Tour

Source: sergioboccardo / shutterstock

Vancouver Foodie Tour

Vancouver is the most ethnically diverse city in the world, which means, if you can dream up a style cuisine, it’s probably here. Its culinary influences are infinite, from the freshest sushi, to the most rustic farm-to-table, you could easily take a tour around the globe eating here, so why not let someone do that for you and hop on a foodie tour. Pair the complex food scene with an exploding craft beer and wine industry and you have yourself the makings of a perfectly delicious day!

12. Hike in Lynn Canyon

Source: Marina Poushkina / shutterstock

Vancouver has two suspension bridges, both equally spectacular, but one is always crowded with tourists and costly, and the other is frequented more by locals and free! Located in the heart of Lynn Valley, Lynn Canyon Park has been delighting hiking enthusiasts for over 100 years! Complete with trails, popular swimming holes, breathtaking waterfalls of course, a hair-raising suspension bridge, 50 meters up in the canopy makes this a must do, no matter how short your visit.

13. Wander Van Dusen Botanical Gardens

Source: Bill Perry / shutterstock

Van Dusen Botanical Gardens

Garden enthusiasts from around the world love wandering the tranquil 22 acres of Vancouver’s Van Dusen Botanical Gardens. The great thing about this paradise in the city is you can visit it all year round. In the warmer months, pack a picnic, take a stroll down Laburnum Walk, and find a find a shady spot to enjoy the fragrant garden. The garden takes you on a tour of the world’s eco system, all in one place.

14. Watch a Concert at the Commodore

Source: Sergei Bachlakov / shutterstock

The Commodore, Vancouver

Vancouver offers up a plethora of live music venues, and there’s always someone famous in town, dazzling the crowds. One of the oldest and most beloved venues is the Commodore Ballroom. Originating in the 1920’s during the vibrant Art Deco era, the Commodore has hosted the likes of Sammy Davis Jr., U2, Tina Turner and Lady Gaga. Unlike the larger venues in town, admission prices are reasonable and the atmosphere casual.

15. Catch a Canucks Game

Source: dean bertoncelj / shutterstock

Canada is hockey country, there is no question. Hockey is to Canada what football (soccer) is to Europe, and if you happen to be in Vancouver between October and April, seeing the Vancouver Canucks go head-to-head with any number of NHL teams is one of the most exciting things to do in Vancouver.

16. Go for a Run in Pacific Spirit Park

Source: Alejandro Osorio A / shutterstock

Pacific Spirit Park

You’ll soon learn that Vancouverites love to spend all of their extra time in the outdoors, and one place they love to do that is in beautiful Pacific Spirit Regional Park. This park is complete With 874 hectares of pristine forest and plenty of manicured trails to run on. Visitors can enjoy a nice long 10km hike around the perimeter, or meander through it. And if you have the pooch along, this park is not only dog-friendly, but in many parts, off-leash friendly.

17. Sea-to-Sky Gondola

Source: Pierre Leclerc / shutterstock

We’ve already suggested you head up the sea-to-sky corridor, what we haven’t delved into are all the amazing things you’ll find along the way like the Sea-to-Sky Gondola, one of Vancouver’s newest and most exciting attractions. Vancouver is all about spectacular views, and the 100 meter long Sky Pilot Suspension Bridge provides 360 degree views of all the Squamish region has to offer. From rugged mountains above to the vibrant turquoise fjord below, you may not want to come down.

18. Catch a Sunset in English Bay


Source: Pinkcandy / shutterstock

Vancouver’s West End neighborhood is one of the most unique in Canada. It’s the most densely populated urban neighborhood in the country, and because of its adjacent location to Stanley Park and with the popularity of the seawall, it’s a highly transitional neighborhood. In the summer, it’s hard to know where the tourists end and the locals begin! When dinner time hits, wander down Denman Street and find a spot for good eats and cocktails. Then head on down to English Bay, find a bench, and watch as mother nature puts on her finest show in the sky above.

19. Visit Christ Church Cathedral

Source: 4kclips / shutterstock

Christ Church Cathedral

Vancouver has many churches, but few as beautiful as the Christ Church Cathedral. You don’t have to be religious to admire this Gothic Revival structure built with West Coast Douglas fir beams. From its exquisite stained glass windows, to stunning archways, this is a great place to find some peace and quiet.

20. Get Folksy on the Sunshine Coast

Source: EB Adventure Photography / shutterstock

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

Vancouver is amazing, but if you are lucky enough to have some extra time on your hands, there is a plethora of day trips that are bucketlist worthy. A forty-minute ferry ride will take you to the Sunshine Coast, Canada’s best kept secret, and one that we’re telling you so you can experience a coastal oasis. The roads are as lackadaisical as the wonderfully quirky people who live in this coastal community. Visitors can base themselves in Sechelt, Roberts Creek or Gibsons, or if you’re feeling more adventurous, rent a cabin up the coast and spend your days shopping at authentic farmer’s markets, laze around peaceful lakes, and or grab a book and head down to the beach for some you time.

21. The PNE

Source: Nalidsa / shutterstock

PNE, Haunted House

Every summer, the Pacific National Exhibition returns to the city for a 17 day stint on its very own designated fair grounds. The century old tradition is local favorite and brings along with it an array of rides, farm animal auctions, a popular concert series, beer gardens, food vendors and all the makings of an exciting city-meets-urban fair.

22. Find a Local Event in the Georgia Strait

Source: androver / shutterstock

Vancouver Convention Center

If a Vancouverite wants to know “what’s on” in the city, they flip through the pages of the Georgia Strait. From hyper local community center talent shows, to blockbuster movies, ballets and headlining super-bands, any event at any time will be listed in here. Check out some jazz at a local club, check out a comedy show on Granville Island, or get dolled up for a charity event at the Vancouver Convention Center, whatever your flavour, you’ll find it listed in this free publication.

23. The Vancouver Aquarium

Source: Hannamariah / shutterstock

If you’ve ever wanted to get up close and personal with what lies beneath the frigid waters of the Pacific Ocean, or what’s living above in canopies of the Brazilian Amazon, the Vancouver Aquarium gives you that opportunity. One of North Americas largest aquariums, and conveniently located in the heart of Stanley Park, this attraction is one of the most popular things to do in Vancouver. There is lot’s to see, and as the Aquarium sees a regular rotation of unique exhibits, you may want to give yourself at least a day to come nose-to-nose with Belugas and learn about how essential the salmon is here in the Coastal ecosystem.

24. Lunch on the Drive

Source: Urban Napflin / shutterstock

Commercial Drive, Vancouver

Like any neighborhood around the world, Vancouver’s urban spaces tell a story. Commercial Drive is one of Vancouver’s oldest and most ethnically eclectic streets, and one that you definitely need to visit. This century old street, now affectionately termed “The Drive” is home to a mix of contemporary and Edwardian houses, Portguese bakeries, Brazilian coffee houses, Italian pasta places and any number of hippy-chic boutiques. In the spring and summer months, the Drive is a hive of activity, and a meeting place for those looking for good eats and great conversation.

26. Ski, Snowboard or Play in the Snow

Source: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock

Vancouver may be a temperate climate, but in the winter months, the North Shore mountains transform into a snow-capped wonderland. With three excellent mountains all within a 15 minutes drive from the downtown core, and a free shuttle to one of them, Vancouver is your perfect place for a winter holiday. Seymour and Grouse Mountain in North Vancouver offer up challenging runs and family fun, and Cypress in West Vancouver has the city’s best tubing park! And for the world class skiier, hob aboard a shuttle and head to Whistler/Blackcomb for one of the best alpine experiences in the world. It’s no wonder Vancouver played host to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games.

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25 Best Things to Do in Vancouver (BC, Canada):

  • Museum Of Anthropology: Xuanlu Wang / shutterstock
  • Sea-to-Sky Highway: Josef Hanus / shutterstock
  • Grouse Grind: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock
  • Stanley Park: romakoma / shutterstock
  • Gastown: i viewfinder / shutterstock
  • China Town, Vancouver: Claudine Van Massenhove / shutterstock
  • Dr. Sun Yat Sen Garden In Vancouver: V J Matthew / shutterstock
  • Deep Cove: Swamis / shutterstock
  • Granville Island: James Wheeler / shutterstock
  • Richmond Night Market: Ronnie Chua / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Foodie Tour: sergioboccardo / shutterstock
  • Lynn Canyon: Marina Poushkina / shutterstock
  • Van Dusen Botanical Gardens: Bill Perry / shutterstock
  • The Commodore, Vancouver: Sergei Bachlakov / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Canucks: dean bertoncelj / shutterstock
  • Pacific Spirit Park: Alejandro Osorio A / shutterstock
  • Sea-to-Sky Gondola: Pierre Leclerc / shutterstock
  • English Bay: Pinkcandy / shutterstock
  • Christ Church Cathedral: 4kclips / shutterstock
  • Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada: EB Adventure Photography / shutterstock
  • PNE, Haunted House: Nalidsa / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Convention Center: androver / shutterstock
  • Vancouver Aquarium: Hannamariah / shutterstock
  • Commercial Drive, Vancouver: Urban Napflin / shutterstock
  • Grouse Mountain: Lijuan Guo / shutterstock
  • Vancouver: mffoto / shutterstock

Lumby BC Travel Gu >Don’t miss a visit to Lumby, the beautiful small town in the North Okanagan. Lumby is a gateway to lakes and backcountry areas in the Monashee Mountains.

Collect the moments, not things – easy to do in Lumby BC

Lumby BC is a small community located at the north end of the beautiful Okanagan Valley at the edge of the Monashee Mountains. It’s only 25 km east of the city of Vernon, British Columbia. The village is a relaxed and friendly place, with many charming quirks.

Is it worth a visit?

Absolutely! There is more to see than just the picturesque village.

And has this town ever changed since I moved here first! In 1999, Lumby BC was a typical logging town. The economy was mainly forestry and agriculture. It was soon after I arrived when the mills started to close down and people lost their jobs.

Will Lumby be another ghost town?

No. it didn’t. Actually, the ghost town image didn’t last long. Several sawmills survived. Still, employment at these mills has drastically been reduced.

Many small home-based businesses started to emerge. Agriculture is as strong as ever and some manufacturing companies have moved into town.

Many residents have jobs in larger towns such as Vernon and Kelowna. Some Lumby residents work in the mines or oil fields in the Northern part of the country.

Lumby Today

Today, the village is growing but the small-town spirit is strongly alive. The village population is around 2000. Approximately another 4,400 people live in the rural communities of Cherryville, Mabel Lake and Whitevale.

Lumby’s image has improved a lot over the last few years. When people ask where I live and I say Lumby BC, they don’t ask anymore why I chose Lumby for my home. I don’t have to explain anymore why I’m here. It’s a unique place, the village of Lumby BC and its surrounding wilderness areas.

People come here for hiking, fishing and camping in the provincial parks. You will find clear mountain lakes and many remote areas to hike in.

Lumby BC and the surrounding backcountry is a hikers paradise. With more than one hundred trails to choose from, you won’t know where to start.

The area is known as the “Hiking Capital of Canada”. Many of the trails also attract mountain bikers and horseback riders and are used by snowshoers, cross-country skiers and snowmobilers in winter.

Why You Should Visit


Lumby BC is considered the ‘Gateway to the Monashees’. The Monashee Mountains (Mountains of Peace) offer unlimited outdoor recreation.

Sparkling lakes nestled in the mountains and streams and rivers flow to the valleys. The area around Lumby is one of British Columbia’s undiscovered gems!

In Lumby, you can pan for gold, stroll our historical mural walk and the Salmon Trail, go camping, venture on one of the many nearby hikes, or arrange to tour the old mining digs in nearby Cherryville.

Lumby BC is the Trail Capital of Canada. In Lumby, you can choose from over a hundred trails that are located throughout the Monashee.

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The waters are ideal for fishing and canoeing. Also, the Lumby waters are the easternmost spawning point for Chinook salmon. It’s no wonder they chose this place to begin an exciting journey.

With its small-town spirit, Lumby is the perfect place to get away from it all. There’s a feeling that can only be described as stimulating; as vacationers and travellers approach this charming heritage village away from the buzz and noise of the city.

Shopping in downtown Lumby offers a healthy selection of businesses all within the reach of a small town. And, at the end of the day, you can relax at one of the eating places to explore delicious backcountry food.

Getting There

Lumby BC is easy to access, located right on the scenic BC Highway #6 that crosses the Monashee Mountains. It connects the vacation spots of the Okanagan and the Kootenay. We are twenty-five minutes east of Vernon, and only fifty minutes from Kelowna International Airport.

From the West Coast, Lumby is easily accessed by car via the Coquihalla Highway (Route 5 – Vancouver to Merritt), the Coquihalla Connector (Route 97C – Merritt to Kelowna), on to Vernon (Highway 97) and then East on Highway 6 to Lumby.
From Spokane, the easiest route is through Osoyoos (Highway 97 to Vernon). From Calgary or Banff, the TransCanada Highway (Route 1) takes you to Revelstoke, then Highway 97a to Vernon.

You will know you’re getting close to Lumby when you see distinct Camel’s Hump getting into the scenic picture in front of you.

From Vernon BC you can catch a local bus to Lumby. Check BC Transit for the schedules.

The town itself is small and easy to get around. You won’t get lost, I promise!

Lots to See and Do in Lumby

Plenty to explore in Lumby BC and area

  • Lumby Days family fair takes place each June, attracting people from around the valley. Other annual events are the Wild Salmon Music Festival, Mabel Lake Fishing Derby and Cherryville Days.
  • Hang Gl >

The perfect place for everything outdoor

Lumby BC and area has miles of open backcountry roads ideal for horseback riding and ATV adventures. Check out the adventure tourism outfitters in town.

Are you a golfer? Enjoy one of our three golf courses and two driving ranges and experience the backcountry atmosphere.

Lumby is known by bikers as a great starting point for one of the best circle routes in British Columbia.

During the winter season, snowmobilers come from far away for the excellent sledding conditions. Park Mountain, Aberdeen, Graystokes and Keefer Lake areas are a few of the snowmobiling destinations.

The Lumby/Mabel Lake Snowmobile Association provides groomed trails and maps for the Park Mountain Range, the Pinnacles, the Monashee Mountains and Silver Star.

Opportunities for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are plenty in our backcountry areas.

Where To Stay

A motel and B & B suits are available near the village centre. For short-time visitors, this is ideal as you are within walking distance to shops, restaurants, Blue Ox Pub, coffee shops, Visitor Centre and all other services. Other accommodation options include rustic lakeside cabins and campsites.

For a special Lumby getaway find a rustic cabin on a lake surrounded by pristine wilderness, ideal for casting a line for trout and kokanee and for wildlife viewing.

Fishing resorts and Wilderness Retreats in the Lumby area offer accommodation in pristine wilderness settings.

RV camping and tent sites are available in the heart of the village at the municipal campground. Private campgrounds are situated in the Mabel Lake Valley, as well as in Cherryville, 29 km east of Lumby.

One of the most beautiful campsites is at Mabel Lake Provincial Park.

Hardcore backcountry campers head for the rustic walk-in sites at Monashee Mountain Provincial Park.

Motors are restricted on Echo Lake and therefore it’s a great lake for canoeing and kayaking.

Climate

Lumby BC has a humid continental climate with hot summers. Fog often sets in during the winter and can last for days.

At an elevation of 495 meters, Lumby receives 1,890 hours of sunshine every year. The average rainfall is 43.6cm and the average snowfall is 143.2cm.

Visitor Information

Drop-in at the Visitors Information Centre when you get to Lumby BC and pick up brochures and maps. The Visitor’s Centre is located at 1882 Vernon Street, tel 250 547 2300
Show map of Lumby

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Stawamus Chief

Rainbow Range Trail

This trail is located in Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park in the Cariboo Regional District. It’s in British Columbia’s central interior, which translates to isolated trails and rural landscapes. The Rainbow Range is well-known for its red, orange, yellow and lavender coloured mountains. A 16-kilometre round trip, the hike can be done in one day, but camping is another option in summer.

Black Tusk

For an easily accessible (but hard) hiking option that includes both turquoise lakes and stunning vistas, choose the Black Tusk trek in Garibaldi Provincial Park. The park is located between Squamish and Whistler. This hike takes you up to Black Tusk, the park’s most prominent peak and a former active volcano. In nine kilometres you will reach the crown jewel, Garibaldi Lake and its campsite. Then another seven kilometres will take you up to Black Tusk’s base.

Beautiful Garibaldi Lake © David Veksler / Flickr

Rockwall Trail

It’s said that this multi-day hike within Kootenay National Park is the pinnacle of Canadian Rockies hiking. The Rockwall Trail is a 55-kilometre trek that takes you along a mountain range. Some of the highlights along the way include Floe Lake, Floe Peak, looking out over Numa Pass, strolling through meadows, and marvelling at the many waterfalls.

West Coast Trail

This world-renowned trail stretches for 75 kilometres along Vancouver Island’s southwest coast. It’s a part of the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve and takes hikers through lush rainforest, past waterfalls, and along the waterfront. The West Coast Trail follows in the footsteps of Canada’s First Nation ancestors.


Along the West Coast Trail © Chris Breikss / Flickr

Golden Ears Provincial Park

Iceline Trail

Glacier Crest Trail

When a trail is a part of Glacier National Park, you know it’s going to be full of jaw-dropping views. Glacier Crest Trail is an 11-kilometre round trip hiking trail near Golden in British Columbia. As the name suggests, along the track hikers get views of both Illecillewaet and Asulkan Glaciers. At the summit, the panorama vista features snow-covered rocky mountains and glacial ice.

Berg Lake Trail

Perhaps the most remote hiking trail on this list, Berg Lake Trail is an internationally-recognized backcountry trek. The trail follows around Mount Robson’s base, which is the Canadian Rockies’ highest peak. Although there are many options, no matter which trail is chosen, hikers will undoubtedly cross paths with glaciers, waterfalls, snowy mountains, and local fauna. The BC Parks website states: “Gaining just under 800 metres in 23 kilometres, the trail traverses three biogeoclimatic zones.”

Reflections in Berg Lake © Dan Dwyer / Flickr

Sunshine Coast Trail

The Sunshine Coast Trail is a 180-kilometre hiking trail along the Sunshine Coast, north of Vancouver. The trail stretches from Sarah Point in Desolation Sound to Saltery Bay. It’s the longest hut-to-hut hiking experience in Canada and traverses a number of different landscapes. The Sunshine Coast Trail goes from shorelines to lakes to mountain tops and forests. It’s an excellent outdoor adventure truly showcasing the best of British Columbia.

Vancouver,BC,Canada

Today I will talk about Canadian travel! In one day, we managed to see quite a lot. In a nutshell, we left at 6 am from Everett to 8 hours crossed the Canadian border, and at 10 pm we crossed it again, but in the direction of the United States already 🙂
The first point of the route was a mountain mt. Grouse (it is located north of Vancouver, 15 minutes). Lake View Capilano Lake.

Next, we plan was ascending Mount Grouse. But on the very hill we climbed, and stopped at the bottom of the lift. The area around the park was fenced and there is a reserve behind the fence (in fact, it is a statue of the reserve).

This handsome wolf was on the other side of the fence in the reserve. And thank God 🙂

I confess that I have never heard the howling wolves live. This is a bloodcurdling howl. Even knowing that the wolf is at the high-voltage fence and simple netting, chustvuesh a little uncomfortable. But it was worth it!

As I said, at the top of the mountain you can climb on this lift. Given the fact that we had a little time, and the price rise per person — $ 50, we went to the side of the Capilano Bridge.

At the bottom of the lake Capilano (it was shown in the first photo) there is a dam.

This dam itself. The difference in height of about 50 meters. After the dam the water rushes on and after driving a bit along the river, we were in Park Capilano Suspension Bridge.

One of the most popular attractions in Vancouver — Capilano Suspension Bridge. The name of the bridge, as well as the park in which it is derived from the name of the leader of the local Indian tribe Squamish.

Traditionally we went to the gift shop, where we bought delicious maple syrup and other souvenirs!

And here is the 137-meter pedestrian suspension bridge, it connects the two banks of deep (70 m!) Capilano River canyon. George Grant Mackay, a Scottish civil engineer, built it in 1889. Used for this hemp rope and cedar planks.

Among the gifts was purchased and the candy in the form of a maple leaf — a symbol of Canada (its use due to the presence of a significant number of maples in Canada. Maple traditionally represents a significant economic resource. In addition to supply a large number of forest resources in exporting countries involved are collected every year maple sugar) !

In the park Capilano, on the other side of the bridge, plenty of hiking paths that lead directly to the water and rise to a height of 10-15 meters from the ground . But that is another attraction — «According to the tops of trees» (Treetops).

On the balcony at a height of one meter 10-15 had this little weather station.

Track interrupted by a small observation balconies that offer beautiful views of the canyon and the bridge hanging over the 70-meter chasm.

The friendly staff at the park.

And it is less friendly, but more nimble resident park 🙂

Capilano walk in the park, we went to the park Stanley. North Vancouver Vancouver is connected to several bridges. But the biggest bridge in Vancouver — undoubtedly suspension bridge Lions Gate length of 1823 m, which connects the shore of the Gulf Berrard. It got its name in honor of Lion Mountain, located in the northern part of the city, as well as by two lions adorning the entrance to the bridge (which is on giving should protect city). It is hard to imagine, but this elegant construction extends from 60 to 70 thousand vehicles per day, and its height is enough to pass under it could deepwater cruise ships and container ships. Overall, the Vancouver area is 20 bridges, three of which — drawbridges.

As I said before, after North Vancouver, moved by Lions Gate Bridge, we were in Stanley Park! The park is located on the peninsula opposite the port of North Vancouver. This is one of the largest urban parks in North America. By area, it is second only to Central Park in New York. View from Stanley Park’a toward the Pacific Ocean.

As in America, the private sector in water / air / car very well developed!

Bridge Lions Gate Bridge was built and paid for the brewing company Guinness, to give people access to the North Shore, where he owned and belongs to the family of Guiness.

In a clearing couple totem poles that adorn today Parks Canada. These poles are usually very recent origin. However, they retain the style and symbolism that has developed among the tribes of North American Indians for centuries. On, the image on the totem pole, a knowledgeable person can read the whole pedigree of the author of this monument. Every object on a pole — a symbolic representation of one of the ancestors, who were related and, accordingly, under the auspices of the beast, bird, or some mythical creatures. «Read» should be top — down from the present, the creator of the totem pole — to the past.

In 1889, Governor General of Canada, Lord Stanley announced the peninsula «green zone» «for the use and enjoyment of people of every color, religion and customs.» The park is laid miles of pedestrian and bicycle paths. Only on the perimeter, along the coast stretches asphalt road for cars, bicycles and walking more than 8 km. Here roam freely deer, skunks, squirrels rushing thousands hoping to seize the remains of some bread, ducks and geese arrange noisy showdown at the coast. From time to time someone from the «frost» Vancouverites flops in the water: the water temperature is not conducive to a long race.

The port city — the largest in Canada and the most diversified, with a trade turnover of more than 75 billion. Canadian dollars per year. Port activity adds 10.5 billion US dollars of GDP and $ 22 billion in economic output.

View of Vancouver from Stanley Park. A couple of words about Vancouver. Vancouver — a city on the west coast of Canada, the largest locality of British Columbia and the third largest in Canada. The population of the city itself — 600,000 people. (June 2006), but in the Greater Vancouver (Greater Vancouver), given the more than 20 suburbs, home to more than 2 million people.
The history of the city begins in winter 1824, when the Hudson’s Bay Company established several Pacific outposts for the fur trade. A group of 40 people led by James MacMillan (James McMillan) chose the place in the valley of the Fraser River — the current district Langley (Langley) — where a few months began to build a fort. It was July 27, 1827 — that can be conventionally regarded as the founding date of the city. Fort Langley was engaged in fur trade (in 1832 it sold 2,000 beaver skins), and by 1840 it had become the largest exporter of fish (salted sturgeon) on the Pacific coast to the main market in Hawaii.

All the familiar Olympic rings! Five interlaced rings, which are depicted on the flag of the Olympic Games known as the Olympic rings. These rings are painted in blue, yellow, black, green and red, and intertwined with each other. They are a symbol of the Olympic Games. Olympic rings were designed by Pierre de Coubertin in 1912. Five rings represent the five continents: America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Oceania. The Americas are considered as a single continent, while Antarctica and the Arctic were not taken into account. Despite the absence of a specific color to a specific continent or region, various theories about the meaning of the colors of the Olympic rings tend to associate them with different quotes. For example, at least one of the five colors of the Olympic rings among present on the flag of each of the participating countries. Five Olympic rings were adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Olympic Games in Belgium in 1920.

Advertising — the motor trade (not even think it would be desirable, as Samsung has given for such a stretch!)

We decided to visit the Harbour Centre Tower: a high-speed glass elevator in seconds lifts on the outside wall of a skyscraper on a platform with a 360 °, where the weather is nice or offer an incomparable view of the great city, the bay Barrard, snow-capped peaks and glaciers North, Canadian and US islands in the south.

As always, I’m on the other side of the fence 🙂

Here’s a view opens from the Harbour Centre!

As I write this, we decided to visit the Harbour Centre. Harbour Centre (Harbour Center) — is a lookout tower, the tallest building in Vancouver! The view from the tower in the direction of Van Sity Seeds.

This is the view from the tower to the North Vancouver. On the left are the sails Canada Place (they were erected in 1984 as the Canada Pavilion for Expo 86). Well, and the tower, which is all you can see, was built in 1977 and opened her Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon. Its height is 177 m, and an observation deck with 360-degree all-round visibility is located at an altitude of 130 m. Inside the tower — 28 floors of office space.

High-speed glass elevator, located on the outside of the tower, just 40 seconds to raise visitors to the review site. And here offers a unique, stunning beautiful view of the bay Berrard, the Pacific Ocean, on Vancouver Island, the bay and the city itself — with its high-rise buildings and small, with its parks and bridges.

Enjoy the view of Vancouver, we went for a walk around the city. One of the low places is Gestaun (Gastown). In 1867, the year of foundation of Canada, on the bay in a boat with a keg of whiskey and his wife, an Indian trader comes enterprising liquor John Deighton, who immediately gets the nickname Jack Chatterbox. Thirsty sawmill workers in one day cleared the forest and built a saloon, which was formed around the new town. So there Gestaun — the future heart of Vancouver, now a popular historic district. In 1870 it was renamed Gestaun in Granville.

Gateway gateways are always 🙂

Just an interesting building on West Pender St.

Bead Science World. It was a building of the Russian national team at the Olympic Games!

On the bay was full of such bashenek. In fact, it is a symbol of the Olympic Games held in Canada. This Inukshuk (Inukshuk) — construction of the stones resembling human silhouette. Inukshuk has a very ancient history. Inuit (Aboriginal living in northern Canada), these sculptures were in fact «road signs». They noted the important places (areas for hunting, storage products), as well as used as a guide, including navigation. In the language of the Inuit «inukshuk» — a substitute person (Inuk — man, Shook — substitute).

Imperceptibly evening came. Tower Harbour Centre.

Canada Place. In Canada Place located corporate offices and cruise terminals Port Metro Vancouver, Vancouver Convention Centre East, at the Pan Pacifis, the World Trade Center.

Bus, which we see these images mascots of the Olympic Games, «blinking», «Kuatchi» and «Sumi». They Canadians tried to merge, as the real inhabitants of the forests and oceans, as well as the popular mythological images. For example, in the figure «flashes» you can see the image of a killer whale (well, nothing Sochi dolphin), inhabiting the Pacific Ocean and at the same time bear in black and white, which, though rare, is found in the forests. «Kuatchi» — is «Saskatch» or «Bigfoot» from the deep forests (closest he seems like a no less mythical image of «Bigfoot»), and «Sumi» recalls mythological thunder-bird. It is important to note that the «Sumi» became the mascot of the Paralympic Games. All figures are derived from the epics Inuit people, who in ancient times lived in northern Canada. Three main mascot and was assistant Mukmuk figurine local groundhog.

Well, in the heart of Vancouver was the Canadian Pavilion 🙂 (at the usual time this building with columns — Museum of Art)

On the way back I turned the wrong way and ended up at the airport 🙂 When leaving the airport was the symbolism of the Olympic Games! It would be interesting to see live to Moscow in his 80th year, during the Olympic Games!

PS Well, for the sake of completeness we can say that in Vancouver in free drugs are used in special shelters under the supervision of doctors and nurses can drive yourself dose + large numbers of homeless people, drug addicts and / or prostitutes, trying to make a potion .

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