Windsor houses vs condos Канада


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Windsor House

We found 493 vacation rentals — enter your dates for availability

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Houses

Condos/Apartments

Studios

Guest houses

Find the best place to stay — Windsor House

Search 493 vacation rentals

Can I find a vacation rental around Windsor House?

Yes, our 2020 property listings offer a large selection of 493 vacation rentals near Windsor House. From 34 Houses to 404 Condos/Apartments, find a unique house rental for you to enjoy a memorable stay with your family and friends. The best places to stay near Windsor House for a holiday or a weekend are on HomeAway.

What is the best area to stay near Windsor House?

Whether you’re traveling with family or friends, here are the areas with the largest selection of vacation rentals for a holiday trip or just for a weekend near Windsor House:

  • Tsim Sha Tsui: 158 vacation rentals
  • Bowrington: 82 vacation rentals
  • Mong Kok: 200 vacation rentals
  • Wan Chai: 83 vacation rentals
  • Yau Ma Tei: 267 vacation rentals

For other neighborhoods, please use our search bar to access the selection of vacation rentals available.

Can I rent Houses near Windsor House?

Yes, of course. HomeAway has 34 Houses near Windsor House. Our other popular types of vacation rentals near Windsor House include:

  • Condos/Apartments: 404 rentals available
  • Cabins: 3 rentals available
  • Cottages: 3 rentals available

But you can also enjoy a great stay in one of our other vacation rentals including Bungalows and more.

Can I find a vacation rental with pool near Windsor House?

Yes, you can select your preferred vacation rental with pool among our 19 rentals with pool available near Windsor House. Please use our search bar to access the selection of vacation rentals available.

Can I book a vacation rental directly online or instantly near Windsor House?

Yes, HomeAway offers a selection of 493 vacation rentals to book directly online and 146 with instant booking available near Windsor House. Don’t wait, have a look at our vacation rentals via our search bar and be ready for your next trip near Windsor House!

Long Term Rentals

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Condos vs. Houses: Which Is Better to Buy?

The Pros and Cons of Two Types of Homeownership

Martin Deja / Getty Images

Aspiring homeowners might gravitate to condos over houses for plenty of reasons: Condos offer less upkeep, look more up to date, and seem to be more affordable. However, the economics of houses may work out better, especially when it comes to selling down the road. Condos also demand certain accommodations when it comes to everyday life, as well.

Defining a Condo

A condo (short for «condominium») is a private residential unit within a multiunit building, project, or community. While the residences are usually apartment-like—they share walls—they can also be semidetached, like townhouses, or even fully detached, too. The residences frequently share common areas, facilities, and amenities, both external (yards, swimming pools) and internal (laundry rooms, garages).

There are two main types of condos: those that were simply converted from rental apartments and those that were originally built as condominiums—sometimes in a brand-new structure, sometimes in a renovated or configured commercial or industrial space. If you can’t see the difference, it probably won’t matter for future values. Often, however, the rental-conversion type is older and can look or feel cheaper—both of which suggest the need for repairs and more upkeep in the future.

A big factor in condo life is the condominium association, run by a board of directors. Responsible for maintaining all the common areas, services, and amenities, it’s comparable to a neighborhood homeowners association (HOA). However, because these commonalities in condo ownership are so significant, condo associations are much more powerful. Condo owners pay regular monthly or quarterly fees to their association.

Comparing Condo and House Prices


To make a fair comparison price-wise, buyers should consider the amount of a condo’s association fees upfront, and equate that sum to an increased mortgage payment. For example, let’s say your condo fee is $250 monthly. At an interest rate of 4.5%, that could be an additional payment on a principal loan sum of $50,000: $50,000 at 4.5% interest over 30 years equals an additional principal and interest payment of $253.34 each month.

What this means to you is that without a condo fee, you could bump up your price range by $50,000, buy a home, and pay about the same amount every month. In other words, if you were planning to buy a $250,000 condo with a monthly $250 fee, you could spend the same amount and instead buy a $300,000 house.

Much depends on the amenities that the condo association covers, however. For example, if your fee pays for vital services such as water and trash collection, it includes expenses you would have to pay anyway if you bought a house.

Pros of Buying Condos

Several lifestyle-related advantages come with owning a condo.

  • State-of-the-art features. If you have your heart set on granite counters, stainless appliances, and an open floor plan, a newer condo usually has them.
  • Luxurious facilities, features, and grounds. Spas, clubhouses, BBQ areas, tennis courts, jogging trails, and rec rooms are among the amenities that condos offer res >
  • Less maintenance and upkeep. No mowing lawns, raking leaves or replacing broken windows. You are generally responsible for only your interior.

Cons of Buying Condos

The downsides to condos are those often characteristic of apartment life or communal living.

  • You are often too close to your neighbors. Sounds and smells can travel through adjoining walls.
  • Your condo fees generally continue to rise. If the building is older, it could require more reserves to pay for roofing, plumbing, and exterior maintenance, which tends to mean higher fees and sometimes special assessments.
  • There can be a Big Brother aspect to living within a community and conforming to rules you d >
  • No matter the layout, a condo is not a house. Most condos are single-story apartments. That means the overall square footage of a two-bedroom condo might be smaller than that of a two-bedroom house. Certainly, it may feel more compact—you won’t have the hallways, windows, stairways and other features that impart a sense of space to a residence. Also, a condo usually won’t give you a private garden to tend or a private driveway in which to wash your car.

Selling the Condo

You should look into the future and consider the marketability of your unit when you wish to move on. One of the drawbacks of buying a condo is that your unit will never be worth more than an identical unit, plus upgrades. Your investment relies on surrounding sales. If another owner sells at a cheap price, that might affect your market value.

The condo complex might not qualify for an FHA loan, usually, because the occupancy percentage of owners vs. tenants exceeds 50%. As a result, a purchaser would need to pay cash or obtain a conventional loan or mortgage. This restriction could affect the number of available buyers when it comes time for you to sell.

Is Buying A Condo A Good Idea Or Should You Just Buy A House Instead?

Modified date: April 16, 2020

There are three primary housing situations available—buying a condo, buying a house, or renting an apartment. Each has its benefits and drawbacks. Let’s take a look at the advantages of each—which are also usually the disadvantages of the others.

Warning: There’s no one-size-fits-all here. What you’re going to find is each housing situation is designed to meet the needs and preferences of the occupant. And that’s a good thing.

Be open to all three at different times in your life.

Why a condo is a good idea—maybe better than a house

Condos are less expensive than houses

According to the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the median existing house price was $241,700, as of January, 2020. The NAR also reported the median existing condo price was $231,600, also as of January, 2020. That’s a difference of only $10,000, but the gap is much wider in a lot of markets.

A lower price means a lower down payment and a lower monthly payment.

No repairs and maintenance, at least on the exterior

This is one of the primary advantages of living in a condo. While homeowners are busy mowing their lawns, painting the house, trimming hedges, cleaning gutters, pruning trees, raking leaves, and shoveling snow, condo owners are busy hanging out at the pool, taking weekend trips, or simply relaxing at home.

The exterior of a condo is both owned and maintained by the homeowner’s association (HOA). The owner is responsible only for the interior. But everything outside the front door is none of their concern. That frees up time (and money) for other pursuits.

Location

Because condos are smaller, and more densely packed, they’re often located closer to amenities. This is particularly true of downtown areas with their large number of cultural activities, shopping, entertainment and job opportunities. Condo owners frequently have shorter commutes than homeowners, who more typically live in distant suburbs and exurban areas.

Amenities

Larger condominium neighborhoods are often packed with shared amenities. These can include swimming pools, tennis courts, gymnasiums, golf courses, park areas, pet parks, and jogging trails. Most of those who live in houses have to commute to public facilities to get those amenities. The condo owner has them without even leaving the property.

Social connections


Neighborhoods of detached single-family homes tend to create distance between neighbors. Condos are much closer to apartments in this regard. Your home is literally surrounded by other units, and you may have others living above or below your unit. There’s also the density factor. Where there may be one home per acre in a detached home neighborhood, there can be 20 or 30 units per acre in a condominium.

This creates a level of intimacy that doesn’t exist in large subdivisions. And since condos tend to attract people of similar backgrounds and interests, there’s a greater likelihood of co-mingling socially. Activities are even more pronounced when there are common recreational amenities to congregate around, like swimming pools and gymnasiums.

Why a house is a better idea than a condo

Having some land

Technically speaking, owning real estate entails land. Condos don’t have it, by definition. Detached houses do. It’s one of the primary advantages of owning a house. Yes, the property needs to be maintained. But you can build a private pool in your backyard, create a garden, host backyard parties, or even play touch football games. And that’s to say nothing of the advantage of having a private, fenced-in backyard where your kids can play safely.

Greater self-determination and self-expression

One of the inherent disadvantages of a condo is uniformity. Since you don’t own the exterior of the home, there’s absolutely nothing you can do with it. A house is a different story entirely. You can paint it any color you like, build a playhouse in the backyard for your kids, or put flowerbeds all over the property. A house can easily be customized, in a way a condo never can.

Room to grow

This is closely related to the land factor. As a family grows, you can also grow your house. You can knock down walls, and add an addition. You can build a deck in the backyard. In some less suburban areas, you can even build a guest house on the property. You can’t do any of that with a condo, and certainly not an apartment.

A house better accommodates life changes

Among all the aspects of life controlled by an HOA, they can even control what you do for a living and who you live with. For example, if you want to start a plumbing business, you can often do it out of a house. You can never do it out of a condo or apartment.

The same is true with living arrangements. Condos have specific limits on who and how many people can live in a unit. If your sister and brother-in-law, and their two kids, need a place to live for a while, you can have can have them live in your house. A condo or apartment is likely to have restrictions that would prevent that arrangement.

A house is generally easier to sell than a condo

Literally speaking, a condo can be a tough sell in a bad housing market. That’s because, for the most part, a condo is a substitute house. They’re the kind of property people buy only in the most robust markets. But detached houses on privately owned lots tend to be more liquid in all kinds of markets.

There’s also the individuality factor. Each house is unique, particularly after it’s been customized by its owners. There’s greater likelihood it will appeal to specific buyers. Condos on the other hand, are uniform. They’re so similar that one unit doesn’t necessarily stand out from the rest. If there are a lot of units for sale in a condo neighborhood, it could take a year or more to sell your unit. This is a major reason why condos are often converted to rentals.

Why you might be better off renting

Lower cost

Simply put, renting is typically the least expensive housing option. That’s in part because apartments are generally smaller than houses and condos, but also because rents are generally lower than typical house payments in most markets.

There’s a third factor, and that’s repair and maintenance costs. An apartment occupant doesn’t have those expenses. They don’t have to pay a $300 per month HOA fee in a condo, or $7,000 to have the roof of the house replaced.

Greater mobility

A tenant has the ability to move on short notice. The owner of a house or a condo generally needs to sell the property in order to move. Sure, there are leases that typically run for one year. But leases usually contain an exit clause. In most cases, the occupant will need to pay two or three month’s rent as a penalty, then they’re free to go.

More convenient location

Because apartments are more tightly packed than houses, and even condos, they often have very convenient locations. In addition to downtown areas, they can be found around major shopping malls, popular recreational amenities, and major highway interchanges. For this reason, a tenant usually has more location options than a homeowner or condo owner.

No sunk capital

Whether you’re buying a house or condo, you’ll have to make a down payment. This can be anywhere from $10,000 to $100,000, or more. Once the down payment is made, you won’t have access to that capital. You can’t spend it, and you can’t invest it.

The apartment tenant, by contrast, has no sunk capital, and therefore complete control over their money. Now, it’s also a fact that many tenants won’t take advantage of this huge benefit. But, if you can invest your money while renting an apartment, you can get the same kind of equity build-up that homeowners and condo owners enjoy. Only you’ll have more direct control over the money, as well as the ability to diversify your investments in a way that the property owner can’t.

Even less maintenance than a condo

This is both a convenience and a financial benefit. Like a condo owner, the apartment tenant has no responsibility for exterior repairs and maintenance. But unlike a condo owner, an apartment tenant has no responsibility for the interior either. For example, if a plumbing fixture starts leaking, it’s the responsibility of the owner or manager to fix it, not the tenant.

Final thoughts on condo vs. house vs. renting

As you can see, there are advantages and disadvantages to each housing type. What’s great is that you can choose whichever works best for you. Even more specifically, you may find that each provides special benefits at different times in your life. For example, early in your life when you’re single or married without children, you may prefer renting an apartment. When you have children, owning a house may be the best option. But when you’re older, and the kids are grown and gone, a condo may provide the best lifestyle.

So, the answer is neither of the three housing types is necessarily better than the others. It really comes down to where you are in life, and what your preferences are.

Windsor House

We found 493 vacation rentals — enter your dates for availability

Find spaces that suit your style

Houses

Condos/Apartments

Studios

Guest houses


Find the best place to stay — Windsor House

Search 493 vacation rentals

Can I find a vacation rental around Windsor House?

Yes, our 2020 property listings offer a large selection of 493 vacation rentals near Windsor House. From 34 Houses to 404 Condos/Apartments, find a unique house rental for you to enjoy a memorable stay with your family and friends. The best places to stay near Windsor House for a holiday or a weekend are on HomeAway.

What is the best area to stay near Windsor House?

Whether you’re traveling with family or friends, here are the areas with the largest selection of vacation rentals for a holiday trip or just for a weekend near Windsor House:

  • Tsim Sha Tsui: 158 vacation rentals
  • Bowrington: 82 vacation rentals
  • Mong Kok: 200 vacation rentals
  • Wan Chai: 83 vacation rentals
  • Yau Ma Tei: 267 vacation rentals

For other neighborhoods, please use our search bar to access the selection of vacation rentals available.

Can I rent Houses near Windsor House?

Yes, of course. HomeAway has 34 Houses near Windsor House. Our other popular types of vacation rentals near Windsor House include:

  • Condos/Apartments: 404 rentals available
  • Cabins: 3 rentals available
  • Cottages: 3 rentals available

But you can also enjoy a great stay in one of our other vacation rentals including Bungalows and more.

Can I find a vacation rental with pool near Windsor House?

Yes, you can select your preferred vacation rental with pool among our 19 rentals with pool available near Windsor House. Please use our search bar to access the selection of vacation rentals available.

Can I book a vacation rental directly online or instantly near Windsor House?

Yes, HomeAway offers a selection of 493 vacation rentals to book directly online and 146 with instant booking available near Windsor House. Don’t wait, have a look at our vacation rentals via our search bar and be ready for your next trip near Windsor House!

Canada Housing Vs. Income Graphs Show Even Vancouver Condos Could Be Out Of Reach In 4 Years

And Toronto’s not far off its «Rubicon» year either.

Jamie and Jenny Sorensen hoped that 2020 would be the year that they finally settled down in Vancouver.

Instead it gave them a crushing education in the realities of buying property there.

Jenny and Jamie Sorensen. (Photo courtesy of Jamie Sorensen)

After months of searching, the expectant couple landed on a two-bedroom, 960-square-foot condo in Vancouver’s popular Main Street area.

It had its own patio and a separate entrance, and they soon fell in love with it. It was listed at $699,000 after an identical unit had sold for $690,000 in the same building.

They put in for $750,000. A neighbour who lived in the building said that seemed a little high.

Vancouver’s Main Street area. (Photo: Flickr user Beth Taylor/Licence)

But the Sorensens’ offer was topped by a competing bid of $820,000 — about $120,000 over asking, and way over market value, their realtor told them.

«I guess market value doesn’t mean anything right now,» Jamie said. «It’s so in flux.»

The defeat was crushing enough to take them out of the house hunt for a time. But it also gave them a premonition of what’s coming — a day in which even the average condo is out of reach for working-class Vancouverites.

A day, by the way, that may be coming sooner than people think.

Housing costs vs. incomes across Canada

The year 2020 could prove a milestone in the history of Vancouver real estate, if an analysis by The Huffington Post Canada is borne out.

It would mark the final year before monthly payments on a single-family home exceed the average monthly income in the city. And it would be the last year in which condos could be considered within the range of housing affordability (30 per cent of income), if trends continue as they have.

Condos along Downtown Vancouver’s waterfront. (Photo: Compass and Camera/Getty Images)

You might call it Vancouver’s «Rubicon» year, a point of no return at which basically every form of housing is unaffordable for local residents.

The graph below shows where average income (blue) could grow to over the next decade, if current trends continues. The red line represents the benchmark price of a single-family home, the orange line condo prices. The purple line is the affordability cutoff — the maximum amount the average homebuyer should be devoting to housing.

It shows condos bumping up against the maximum affordability range in just five years:


Greater Vancouver:

(Scroll to the bottom of the story for methodology)

These forecasts don’t account for possible developments such as an interest rate hike, nor any possible new regulation by the federal government, or a crackdown on capital outflows from China (which is entirely possible).

It merely shows just how difficult buying conditions could be for local residents if nothing changes.

The trend was concerning, if not particularly surprising, for David Eby, the B.C. NDP’s housing critic.

He said prices are being driven by external factors, such as foreign money snapping up Vancouver real estate market, creating a situation where it «doesn’t really matter to the market that mortgage payments exceed incomes.»

David Eby, the B.C. NDP’s housing critic. (Photo: John Lehmann/Globe and Mail via CP)

Eby is concerned about how such a trend could hurt the city’s economy.

«I’m talking to people who are trying to recruit and hire people to work at businesses in Vancouver,» he told HuffPost Canada.

«And they’re choosing not to come to Vancouver because, on the salaries that are being offered, they can’t find adequate housing for their families.»

But Vancouver isn’t the only city where housing is outstripping local incomes.

Toronto, too, could soon see single-family home prices overtake in the foreseeable future — albeit some years later than in Vancouver:

Toronto (416 area code):

Toronto (905 area code):

Toronto housing in the 416 could reach its «Rubicon year» for single-family homes just after 2026; the same could happen for condos beyond that year.

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) has noted that sales have effectively flatlined in both cities.

Toronto condos near the CN Tower. (Photo: Getty Images)

But that doesn’t mean interest in these markets is falling, CREA economist Gregory Klump told HuffPost Canada last month. It just means there’s a lack of supply.

These trends will only boost sales (and prices) in communities outside Vancouver and Toronto. And nothing will change in those areas either until, like the cities, sales fall due to a shortage of homes.

Not every Canadian city is grappling with affordability issues the way they are. Montreal, by contrast, has no housing crisis to speak of, according to HuffPost Canada’s analysis.

Montreal:

And there are a few reasons for this, according to Paul Cardinal, an economist with the Quebec Federation of Real Estate Boards.

One is that Montreal doesn’t have a supply issue the way Toronto and Vancouver do. It also has a more affordable rental market that provides comparatively little incentive to buy a home.

An apartment block in Montreal’s Plateau-Mont Royal neighbourhood. (Photo: Lorraine Boogich/Getty Images)

«In Montreal, for a two-bedroom dwelling, the average rent is $760 per month, which is a lot more affordable than anywhere else in Canada,» Cardinal said.

«In other provinces, the difference between renting and owning is smaller than people who have a stronger propensity to become owners, but in Montreal, we don’t have that much pressure.»

This is what housing prices could look like in three more major Canadian cities in the next decade:

Calgary:

Edmonton:

Ottawa-Gatineau:

The Huffington Post Canada has projected how high housing prices could go relative to incomes in six Canadian cities over the next decade.

They were drawn up using income data from Statistics Canada, as well as housing data from real estate boards in different provinces.

Average increases were derived by looking at how much single-family and condo prices grew each year in March for the past three. A 2.89-per-cent interest rate (a common rate available right now) was then applied to these prices, then the resulting number was divided by 25, to provide an estimate for annual mortgage payments on a 25-year amortization.

Average income increases were drawn from data for the years 2007 until 2013, the last for which data was available from StatsCan.

Those numbers were then compared against an «affordability range» — that is, 30 per cent of the average income in a given year.

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) considers housing affordable if it only takes up 30 per cent of a household’s before-tax income.

A different method was necessary for Calgary and Edmonton. Average household income data was not available for any cities beyond 2013, and therefore, any calculations based on this could not account for the drop in oil prices. Using this data would have provided very optimistic projections for income in those cities.

Instead, HuffPost Canada average weekly wage data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) for 2007 through 2015. Housing prices in those cities were then compared against average provincial incomes.


The trends don’t account for developments such as an interest rate hike, nor any possible new regulation by the federal government, or a crackdown on capital outflows from China.

It merely shows how difficult buying conditions could be for local residents if nothing changes.

Long Term Rentals

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Condo vs. Townhouse: What’s the Difference?

Let’s start with condo and townhouse definitions:

What is a condo?

A condominium, or condo, is a building or community of buildings in which units are owned by individuals, rather than a landlord.

What is a townhouse?

A townhouse is defined as conjoined units that are owned by individual tenants. They are architecturally similar to row houses in that owners usually share at least one or more walls.

If you’re thinking of buying or renting a townhouse or condominium, there are some important differences between the two that you should know about. We’ve put together a comprehensive comparison to help you make an informed decision before you buy.

Townhouse vs. Condo

Condo Townhouse
Ownership Condo owners only own the interior of their unit. All other areas, including the building exterior, lawn and communal areas, are property of the Homeowners Association (HOA). In most townhouse communities, owners own their unit’s interior and exterior, including the roof, lawn and driveway, but not the communal areas.

Architecture Condos come in many different styles. They may be part of a large high rise, a cul-de-sac of cottages or anything in between. Townhouses are designed in rows, so tenants usually share at least one wall. It’s common for townhouses to have two or more stories.

Community Condominiums often have a community focus with a club house, pool, golf course and/or similar amenity.

Some townhouse communities offer the same types of amenities as condos, but others are more private.

Homeowners Association Fees HOA fees for condos are typically higher than townhouses because they pay for exterior upkeep, such as lawn care, trash removal and pest control.

Townhouse owners pay lower monthly HOA fees because they pay for much of their own upkeep. Certain types of maintenance and trash removal are still handled by the HOA.
Home Insurance Rates Home insurance rates are usually lower for condos because owners have to insure only the interior of their unit.

Townhouses may have higher home insurance rates, since most owners need insurance that covers both the exterior and interior.

Size Although condos come in many sizes and styles, they are generally smaller than townhouses.

Townhouses can be quite large and often feature multiple stories.

Maintenance Fees Condo owners often pay higher monthly maintenance fees, which go toward exterior and community space repairs. As with HOA fees, townhouse owners typically have lower monthly maintenance fees, but pay more out of pocket for exterior and interior care.

Privacy Depending on the style, condos could be private, individual homes or apartment-style units.

Townhouses share one to two walls with neighboring units, but don’t have units above or below them.

Remember, whether you choose a condo or a townhouse, Nationwide has you covered. Learn more about insurance options for condos and townhouses today.

15 Best Things to Do in Windsor (Ontario, Canada)

Windsor is a mid-sized city that sits right along the Detroit River opposite the US city of Detroit. It is a city of history and culture, which can be seen at every turn, what with its historic architecture, modern towers and multicultural residents.

Tourism plays a big part in Windsor’s economy, as it is home to numerous fabulous attractions. It is also home to some lovely parks and green spaces, a lively downtown area and some great festivals. Here are the best things to do in Windsor:

1. Try your luck at a casino

There are four casinos in the Detroit–Windsor area, though Caesars Windsor is the only one in Windsor itself. The casino sits along the waterfront overlooking Detroit, so even if you don’t want to gamble you can still enjoy the views from the bar.

The casino attracts over six million visitors each year, featuring a Roman Empire theme. Try your luck at Caesars Windsor’s poker tables, blackjack tables, craps tables or baccarat tables, or slip coins into one of its many slot machines.

In addition to gambling, the casino also lets you bet on sports games at its onsite sports bar. Bets are taken on any professional sports game as well as American college basketball and football games.

2. Go back in time

Having such a long history, it should be of no surprise that Windsor is home to a number of National Historic sites. Go back in time and visit these iconic buildings.

One of the most notable historic sites in the city is Willistead Manor; a Tudor-Jacobean style manor house that was designed by architect Albert Kahn. The mansion has a total of 36 rooms and sits in the middle of a beautiful park.

François Bâby House was built by politician François Baby and today is home to Windsor’s Community Museum. Then there is the Sandwich First Baptist Church, which was established by Underground Railroad refugees.

3. Go for a bike r >

Roy A. Battagello River Walk Bike Trail

If you love the outdoors and cycling, the Roy A. Battagello River Walk Bike Trail is a must. The trail starts at the Ambassador Bridge and continues through the city for eight kilometres.

The bike trail goes through Downtown Windsor and many of its parks, including Dieppe Gardens and the Windsor Sculpture Park. It also connects with other trails, like the Russell Street Neighbourhood Trail and the La Salle Trail Network.

There are five service spots along the Roy A. Battagello River Walk Bike Trail where you can stop and rest, put air in your tires or just enjoy the skyline and the river. Parts of it also runs along main streets in the city, though there are designated bicycle lanes.

4. Look at art

Source: JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock.com

Windsor Sculpture Park

A great thing about Windsor is that this can be done both inside and outside. On a nice day, go for a leisurely stroll around the Windsor Sculpture Park, which is home to 35 large-scale sculptures.

If you would rather stay indoors, head to the Art Gallery of Windsor. The gallery was established in 1943, and since then it has grown considerably.

One of the country’s best collections of Canadian art is displayed at the gallery, though there are also pieces by international artists. Wander around the gallery and look at the art, either in the permanent or temporary galleries.

5. Splash around at a water park

On a hot or a cool day you can have some fun splashing around the Adventure Bay Family Water Park. The 10,000+ square metre water park is one year-round, although some parts of it only open in the summer months.

People of all ages can enjoy the waterpark’s five waterslides, surfing simulator, wave pool and lazy river. There is also a dry area where kids can play on a three-level giant playground.

The Python is the most thrilling attraction in the park, while Tot Loch is best for the young ones. After splashing around you can relax and get a snack at the concession stand.

6. Wander around a garden

There are a plethora of lovely gardens in Windsor that make for a nice afternoon. These are all over the city, although Coventry Gardens is one of the best of the best.

Coventry Gardens is a 28,000 square metre park that sits right along the riverfront. The park dates back to 1931 and is home to several historic monuments.

Dieppe Gardens is another great place to walk around, what with its beautiful flowers and grassed area. The Bert Weeks Memorial Gardens features a curved waterfall, a terraced garden and a reflecting pool.

7. Head to the beach

Yes, there is a beach in Windsor. It is right at the mouth of the Detroit River on the very northeast corner of the city.

Sandpoint Beach; aka Stop 26, is the most popular beach in the area, which opens from May 24 to September every year. The beach is backed by a lovely park that is great for relaxing, sunbathing and picnicking.

Spend a hot summer day windsurfing, boarding or swimming, or just walk along the Ganatchino Trail and enjoy the fresh air. There are also barbeque areas, volleyball courts and shady treed areas, as well as ice cream stands and other concession booths.

8. Be one with nature

The 350-hectare Ojibway Prairie Complex is filled with parks, trails and nature reserves. It is a fantastic place to go if you want to surround yourself in nature.

There are five separate areas within the complex, including Ojibway Park, Black Oak Heritage Park and the Ojibway Prairie Provincial Nature Reserve. In addition to hiking through the complex, you can also join a fee educational program or enjoy one of its exhibits.

While exploring the complex, you may encounter lizards, turtles, frogs, bats and even snakes. It is also a fantastic place for bird watching, as there are a plethora of bids that call the forests, prairies and ponds home.

9. Go on a walking tour

What started off as a French Parish is now a community that has seen many faces in history. Ford City is a community that was formed around the Canadian Ford Motor Company.

There are several examples of different types of architecture within the planned community, many of which were built by or for immigrants that came to work for the massive car manufacturer. Go on a walking tour of Ford City and explore this unique area of the city.

Some iconic buildings within the community include its four Byzantine-styled Orthodox churches and Edgemere, which was the house of Wallace Campbell. There are also murals on many of the building depicting the story of Ford and of Ford City.

10. Enjoy a festival

Windsor-Detroit International Freedom Festival

Being quite a culturally rich city it should be of no surprise that Windsor hosts many annual festivals and events. Some of these are in conjunction with Detroit, while others are only within Windsor itself.

Windsor-Detroit International Freedom Festival is the largest of them all, which is put on by the two cities. The festival is held during Canada Day (July 1st) and the Fourth of July and features one of the world’s biggest fireworks displays.

If you enjoy music, don’t miss Bluesfest International Windsor each July, while cinema lovers should be sure to check out the Detroit Windsor International Film Festival if visiting in June. There is also the Windsor Emancipation Celebration Festival that is held in August.

11. Play a round of golf

There are a couple of fantastic golf courses in Windsor that any golfer should play a round in if visiting the city. One is a newer course, while the other dates back to 1926.

The Thomas McBroom designed Ambassador Golf Club was ranked as one of the top new courses in the country! It is an 18-hole, 71 par course that is open to the public.

The historic Roseland Golf Course is actually designated as an Ontario Heritage Site. Since it opened its doors it has hosted numerous tournaments, and will still challenge any golfer to this day.

12. Visit an island

The 36 hectare Peche Island sits on the Canadian side of the Detroit River. It is completely uninhabited, but is open to the public for day trips.

On the island there are beaches, trails and picnic areas. It also boasts spectacular views of Detroit.

The only way to get to the island is by boat, canoe or kayak, so be sure to be prepared before heading there. But it is well worth the visit, as it makes for a great place to escape the city and enjoy some peace and quiet.

13. Drink whiskey

Canadian Club Brand Centre

Everyone knows that Canadian Club is of course a brand of Canadian Whiskey. But what many people don’t know is that it was founded in Windsor.

The Canadian Club Brand Centre was built in 1894 and is today a historic site. The building itself is a stunning example of historic architecture in the city, although most come to the centre for the whiskey.

Canadian Club is over 155 years old. Visit the centre and take a 90 minute tour of the building and learn about the history of the whiskey. The tour of course ends with a tasting.

14. Be a scholar

University Of Windsor

Not literally, although you can take a course at the University of Windsor. However, its grounds and architecture are far more interesting to visitors.

The university was established in 1857 as a theological institution. Today it is a 51 hectares campus of greenery, a riverside promenade and some beautiful buildings.

Dillon Hall is the oldest building on campus, which dates back to when the university first opened its doors. Other iconic buildings at the university include Memorial Hall, Lambton Tower and the Odette Building.

15. Go shopping

Windsor Crossing Premium Outlets

Being a border city, Windsor is of course a shopper’s haven. There are duty free shops, specialty shops and shopping malls that will please any shopaholic.

Cigars is the biggest buy in Windsor, as the finest Cubans can be snatched up for great bargains. Fashionistas will want to head to Devonshire Mall or the Windsor Crossing Premium Outlets.

If you are coming in from or heading to the USA, be sure to make a stop at one of the duty-free shops. There are two, both of which sell all of the usual duty-free goods.

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